Issue Brief -- Montana and Idaho Legislation Requiring Ethanol in Gasoline

Issue Brief

Montana and Idaho Legislation Requiring Ethanol in Gasoline

Montana

House Bill 464 requires the Department of Labor and Statistics to adopt standards and specifications ensuring that all gasoline sold to consumers for use in motor vehicles must be blended with 10 percent denatured ethanol and may not contain more than trace amounts of the additive commonly known as MTBE. The bill exempts airplanes authorized to use gasoline.

AOPA is opposed to this bill for the following reasons:

  • Although airplanes authorized to use gasoline are exempted from using ethanol-blended gasoline, the resulting lack of availability of non-blended gasoline across the state would make it extremely difficult - if not impossible - for pilots of such airplanes to obtain.
  • While existing aircraft that have a supplemental type certificate can also burn 100 low lead fuel, the use of such fuel could result in increased engine deposits both in the combustion chamber and in the engine oil.
  • The Federal Aviation Administration's newly created Light Sport category of aircraft runs on auto fuel and will strongly feel the impact of this bill when such aircraft begin to be produced and sold.
  • The Montana Aeronautics Division could lose funding since it no longer will benefit from the 1/25 of 1 percent of the auto fuel tax received for the off-road use of auto fuel.

Idaho

Senate Bill 1004 provides that, beginning on April 1, 2010, gasoline for motor vehicle use sold in Idaho must be blended with at least 10 percent by volume agriculturally derived denatured ethanol. The bill exempts airplanes authorized to use gasoline.

AOPA is opposed to this bill for the following reasons:

  • Although airplanes authorized to use gasoline are exempted from using ethanol-blended gasoline, the resulting lack of availability of non-blended gasoline across the state would make it extremely difficult - if not impossible - for pilots of such airplanes to obtain.
  • While existing aircraft that have a supplemental type certificate can also burn 100 low lead fuel, the use of such fuel could result in increased engine deposits both in the combustion chamber and in the engine oil.
  • The Federal Aviation Administration's newly created Light Sport category of aircraft runs on auto fuel and will strongly feel the impact of this bill when such aircraft begin to be produced and sold.

Posted Friday, January 28, 2005 10:39:04 AM