AOPA Pilot Protection Services

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MedXPress questions: How do I report multiple doctor visits?

Article | Feb 25, 2013

MedXPress has space for 20 visits, so for many pilots that should provide plenty of real estate. Gary Crump, AOPA's director of medical certification, provides tips on what to do if you need to list more than 20 visits.

MedXPress question: What if I share an email address?

Article | Feb 18, 2013

If your spouse or family member is a pilot and shares an email address with you, can both of you use it to register for MedXPress? Unfortunately, the answer is no.

What the heck is an exculpatory clause?

Article | Feb 11, 2013

In the past, when it came to signing agreement releases, the advice was to "sign it and don’t worry about it because it will never hold up in court." The law is changing, and more than ever these releases are being enforced.

A common diagnosis: Atrial fibrillation

Article | Feb 01, 2013

One of the more commonly seen irregular heart rhythms at the FAA is atrial fibrillation, or A-fib. Your normal electrical heart beat originates in the upper chamber in the heart known as the atrium.

Fly Well: Avoid crud

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2013

Tires, grist, and exhaust pipes

The FAA sent a letter about my medical. Now what?

Article | Jan 28, 2013

Occasionally, a pilot who walked out of the aviation medical examiner's (AME's) office with a medical in hand will receive a letter from the FAA months later questioning the pilot's eligibility to hold a medical certificate.

Surviving a ramp check

Article | Jan 22, 2013

FAA "ramp checks" are a bit of a mystery. Kathy Yodice, an attorney for AOPA's Pilot Protection Services, explains what to expect from the inspector and how to respond.

Prepare a winning case

Article | Jan 14, 2013

Get insider tips from Dr. Warren Silberman, former manager of FAA Aerospace Medical Certification, on preparing your medical packet for the FAA’s review so that you can get your case approved and medical certificate in hand, sooner with less hassle.

Secret 'no-fly zone'?

Article | Jan 10, 2013

Robin Fleming was arrested for breach of peace after flying his sailplane over the H.B. Robinson Nuclear Generating Station at an altitude of 1,518 feet msl—by his estimates, about 1,000 feet over the power plant’s dome. Why?

Can I fly after a stroke?

Article | Jan 03, 2013

The three terms one hears when dealing with a “stroke” are cerebrovascular accident, stroke, and transient ischemic attack (TIA). In a TIA, a person has neurological symptoms lasting for several minutes up to several hours.

AOPA Action

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2013

Responding to member concerns, AOPA and the Experimental Aircraft Association will request an exemption that would allow many pilots flying the most common single-engine aircraft recreationally to use a driver's license and self-certification medical standard.

The ABCs of EKGs

Article | Dec 28, 2012

If you require an electrocardiogram for your aviation medical certificate, it is the AME’s responsibility to interpret the EKG and if it is abnormal to have you undergo certain testing and evaluations. Find out how to ensure the doctor does the job properly.

New Year's 'fly well' resolutions

Article | Dec 17, 2012

Most resolutions fade by Jan. 2, but getting healthy keeps you flying longer, so give it a shot. Dr. Jonathan M. Sackier looks at a few corollaries to benefit your health, inside and outside the cockpit.

Seatbelts: Remember the rule of three

Article | Dec 07, 2012

As pilot in command of an aircraft, you have a lot of responsibility, especially when you have passengers aboard. Not only must you make sure you are buckled up, but the regulations require that you must also assure that your passengers are buckled up and you must be sure to brief them. I find that the requirements are easiest to remember as a "Rule of Three": briefing, notification, and use.

AOPA Action

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2012

Responding to member concerns, AOPA and the Experimental Aircraft Association will request an exemption that would allow many pilots flying the most common single-engine aircraft recreationally to use a driver's license and self-certification medical standard.

Choosing medications and medical devices

Article | Nov 21, 2012

How does the FAA choose which medications to approve? Dr. Warren Silberman, the former manager of FAA Aerospace Medical Certification, explains.

High blood pressure disqualifying?

Article | Nov 06, 2012

Concerned about losing your medical because of high blood pressure? Don't be spooked by marketing scare tactics: More than 64,000 airmen are flying with high blood pressure on medication.