Capitol Hill

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Budget plan protects GA

Advocacy | Jan 15, 2014

Key general aviation programs are protected under an omnibus spending bill passed by the House and Senate. It also prohibits new aviation user fees.

New law gives GA reason to be thankful

Advocacy | Nov 27, 2013

Just as many were headed out of Washington, D.C., to begin the Thanksgiving holiday, the general aviation community found one more reason to be thankful as the long-awaited Small Airplane Revitalization Act became law.

Barrow honored for work on Capitol Hill

Article | Oct 10, 2013

AOPA honored Rep. John Barrow (D-Ga.) Oct. 10 with the Joseph B. Hartranft Jr. Award—one of the association’s two highest honors—for his unparalleled work on behalf of general aviation in the House of Representatives.

GA Caucus briefed on efforts to double safety, halve cost

Article | Sep 26, 2013

AOPA met recently with key senators and staffers to talk about ways to make general aviation aircraft twice as safe at half the cost.

House GA Caucus reaches new record

Article | Sep 20, 2013

The House GA Caucus has reached a new membership record, marking the first time more than half of all House members have joined the group.

Big jets a no-show at AirVenture

Article | Aug 01, 2013

Military displays and airshow acts nowhere to be found at EAA AirVenture, thanks to federal budget cuts known as "sequestration."

Small-airplane revitalization bill soars in House

Article | Jul 17, 2013

The U.S. House has passed an AOPA-backed bill setting a deadline for the FAA to overhaul Part 23 aircraft certification regulations.

House committee supports small aircraft revitalization bill

Article | Jul 10, 2013

A bill backed by a House committee sets a 2015 deadline for the FAA to revamp small-airplane certification rules.

President’s Position: Regulatory delays

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2013

During most AOPA Town Hall gatherings, I remind participating members that AOPA's founders created our organization in 1939 largely because they feared that a government about to enter a world war just might regulate general aviation out of existence. Nearly 75 years later, our mission is grounded in similar concerns--raised not by the prospect of war but by the growing power of regulatory agencies, many of which operate with increasing autonomy and minimal oversight.