Electric

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In-flight Charger

Article | Jul 28, 2014

Chip Yates, who set five electric aircraft world records in 2012, now aims to cross the Atlantic on battery power.

Airbus to certify electric twin

Article | Jul 17, 2014

Airbus Group plans to certify production versions of its E-Fan electric twin and has a goal of late 2017 entry into service for the two-seater, the company said in a video from Farnborough International Airshow July 14.

An electric record

Article | Jun 24, 2014

South Carolina pilot Gary Davis barely made it above the Greenville Downtown Airport Class D airspace, though he most likely set a world record doing it.

Electric April

Article | May 01, 2014

Two-seat solar and battery-powered prototypes were announced, and the "rock stars" of electric research and development gathered in California, marking significant progress in electric aviation.

Lindbergh backs innovation

Article | Mar 26, 2014

The grandson of Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh plans to re-create their 1931 seaplane journey to China, demonstrating green technology along the way.

NASA tests insect solutions

Article | Nov 27, 2013

A small team of specialists at NASA’s Langley Research Center has taken to the skies in a Falcon jet hunting bugs.

Hyperloop

Article | Oct 03, 2013

Futuristic high-speed Hyperloop would allow travel on air

Propulsion: Where Do We Go From Here?

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2013

While general aviation faces numerous challenges, arguably none is bigger than the future of our powerplants. Today, most of us fly behind, next to, or in front of engines designed 70 or more years ago.

East meets West in the Power90

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2013

The eventual pairing of a capitalist King Air C90 made in the American heartland with engines designed and built behind the Iron Curtain would have been hard to imagine at the time they both were originally designed.

Electric airplanes? EAS guides the way

Article | May 09, 2013

Batteries that have a specific energy 45 times that of the one in a typical Cessna or Piper? The Electric Aircraft Symposium VII, April 26 and 27 in Santa Rosa, Calif., featured 25 speakers on topics ranging from a propeller safety device to sustainability and maintenance.

Doolittle Tokyo Raider dies at 96

Article | Feb 28, 2013

Thomas C. Griffin, a navigator on Crew No. 9 during the famed Tokyo Raid on Japan on April 18, 1942, died Feb. 26 at the age of 96.

Wright factory to be preserved

Article | Dec 11, 2012

The original factory where the Wright brothers built their first mass-produced aircraft was at risk in 2008 when the then-occupant, a car parts factory, closed. The factory could be part of the Dayton historical tour in a couple of years.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2012

Flying wild at AOPA Summit Alaska’s pilots to host ‘Adventures in Flying’ You’ve watched them fly through severe turbulence and battle fierce winds, deal with airsick passengers, and squeeze million-dollar aircraft into a hangar with mere inches to spare to prevent a severe case of hangar rash during the cold Alaskan winter months. They’re John Ponts, Luke Hickerson, and Doug Stewart—featured pilots on Discovery Channel’s Flying Wild Alaska.

Letters

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2012

After more than 10 years, AOPA Pilot has been redesigned. Editor in Chief Tom Haines asked readers what they thought in his “Waypoints” column.

Electric Long-EZ hits 202 mph

Article | Jul 19, 2012

Chip Yates of the Flight of the Century project took a battery-powered Long-EZ on only its second flight at Inyokern Airport in California, 120 miles northeast of Los Angeles, on July 19. He flew at 202.6 mph, breaking the Cri-Cri record of 175 mph, and ended the flight with an emergency landing.

Aero fever

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2012

AERO Friedrichshafen, Europe’s premier general aviation exhibition, hosted 30,800 visitors this year and featured a number of significant announcements. Increasingly, the AERO show’s importance is rising in step with Europe’s growing profile in the light end of the general aviation spectrum.

Major firms join electric aircraft discussion

Article | May 01, 2012

Wheel motors that can help accelerate an electric aircraft to liftoff within 100 feet or less will mark the next phase in the development of electric aircraft, with near-whisper-quiet designs soon to follow.

Clouds, rain dampen attendance at Va. Festival of Flight

Article | May 01, 2012

Overcast skies conspired with a threat of rain in the forecast to keep crowds at Suffolk Executive Airport small on April 28 for the opening day of the fifteenth annual Virginia Regional Festival of Flight. While the anticipated rain showers held off until midafternoon, the forecast was more optimistic for the event's second and final day.

PC-Aero goes solar

Article | Apr 19, 2012

PC-Aero GmbH's new Elektra One Solar, exhibited at Aero, has solar panels attached to the upper surfaces of the wings, horizontal stabilizer, and fuselage.

Power project raises aviation safety concerns

Advocacy | Feb 02, 2012

A careful study of aviation safety concerns is "imperative" when the Oregon Department of Energy reviews a proposed gas-fired power plant to be built near the Portland-Troutdale Airport, AOPA said in a Jan. 31 letter to the state agency.

Green flight challenge

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2011

In this nation's history, the inevitable transition from horse to train to automobile had its share of forward thinkers, dreamers, charlatans, fools, and luminaries. New wasn't always better, and an argument could always be made that any emerging technology had flaws so deep in its DNA that it would never succeed.

License to Learn

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2011

Electric airplanes, synthetic vision, and iPad accessories these things, abundant at this year's EAA AirVenture.

AOPA Media

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2011

STORIES WITH ENHANCED CONTENT 88 Magical Aerial Miles The breathtaking photography by Chris Rose that accompanies Dave Hirschman’s Epic Flight through the Canyonlands is just a small slice of the visual entertainment from this trip. Produced by the Recreational Aviation Foundation (RAF), this incredible video will have you believing that you are flying in the Waco biplane right alongside Hirschman and crew.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2011

The elephant at AirVenture The elephant in the room at this year’s EAA AirVenture is a 246-foot-long Zeppelin, the Farmers Airship, that will be offering $400 rides for 45 minutes above the Oshkosh show and surrounding areas. The airship is operated by Airship Ventures, based at Moffett Field in California, and gives rides along the West Coast from Long Beach to Seattle.

Flying skeletons and electric hummingbirds

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2011

Extreme flying doesn't always mean speed. It can refer to a lack of speed, too. Here are two model airplanes that are polar opposites, as are their pilots. One lingers on the edge of an aerodynamic stall for more than a half hour and will star in its own documentary called "Float", while the other zooms about with electric power, hovering on its tail - or nose - teaching even the birds new tricks. Both have a greater connection to general aviation than you'd think.

Hangar Talk

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2011

“The combination of a Waco Classic radial-engine biplane, sparkling autumn weather, and a whole continent to fly across was like an aviation fantasy,” Senior Editor Dave Hirschman says of the autumn 2010 flight from Maryland to AOPA Aviation Summit in Long Beach, California (“Epic Flight: 88 Magical Aerial Miles”). “Throw in some good friends and talented professionals like John McKenna of the Recreational Aviation Foundation, videographer Jim Clark, and AOPA Photographer Chris Rose and you’ve got the makings of an unforgettable flying adventure.” The highlight of a trip full of spectacular scenes took place above the winding Colorado River where the raging waters carve through the ancient and dramatic western landscape.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2011

A son's memorial to his dad This is the second time this Chance Vought F4U-4 Corsair aircraft has been restored. After serving on two aircraft carriers during the Korean War, the aircraft went to the Honduran Air Force.

Piper Mirage: Pressurization

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2011

You might think that the primary driver of a pilot’s move from a piston airplane to a light turbine is the need for more speed, or range, or altitude. And while those factors certainly play a part in the decision, my recent conversations with pilots who have made the move suggest that the primary reason for the change was to get pressurization.

GA Serves America: Guarding the grid

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2010

Power line poles, flashing by at regular intervals, can be mesmerizing—as anyone who has ever taken a long car or train ride across the United States knows. They are no less mesmerizing from about 200 feet agl and 25 feet away, even though a part of your pilot brain is demanding to know why you’re in an airplane this close to 64,000 volts.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2010

This could have been written in the 1920s, although barnstorming then wasn’t done on a schedule. The American Barnstormers Tour continues its multiyear run with a new tour in the central United States from June to July.

Seen in Sebring

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2010

The U.S. Sport Aviation Expo in Sebring, Florida, gave a revealing glimpse at the innovation and refinement taking place in the Light Sport Aircraft category.

Thrust buster: Sierra Super S–II

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2010

Turbine Pilot Special Edition Thrust buster: Sierra’s new Citation Super S–II Go time: Climbing from one takeoff segment to another Performance calculations: One manufacturer’s approach TOLD you so: Calculating takeoff and landing data Flying in the wild, wild West: Where the airplane is an important tool Simulating reality: Tips for acing your next training session Cessna built some 1,700-plus older Cessna Citations, and many of them are still out there paying their way. These are the Citations that established the line as one of the all-time, hands-down bestsellers.

Fun at Mach 0.162

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2010

Cessna SkyCatcher 162 test pilots proudly wear a shoulder patch declaring they have “Fun at Mach 0.162” (they also test jets). They could have claimed Mach 0.172 (true airspeeds are between 115 and 118 knots), but then the model number wouldn’t match the Mach number.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2009

Economic recovery at least a year off To those of you looking for signs of economic recovery, just wait. You ain’t seen nuthin’ yet, literally.

Proficient Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2009

A friend, Steve Kivo, called excitedly, “Hey, Barry, how would you like to see that electric airplane from China?” A rhetorical question; he knew that I would. “It’s being flight-tested here in Camarillo.

Buying new, now

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2009

How bonus depreciation and increased expensing limits can make good business sense. These stressed economic times make it easy for many of us to quash ideas of buying an airplane.

GA and the Environment: Euro-vironment

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2009

A broad-brush introduction to the politics of environmental protection gives us a backdrop for a quick review of how European general aviation is coming to terms with environmental challenges. Comparatively speaking, American public attention has only recently been strongly focused on environmental policymaking.

Those magnificent flying machines

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2009

The assassination on June 28, 1914, of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, triggered a series of events that led inexorably to the outbreak of war in Europe a month later. The Great War began less than 11 years after the Wright brothers’ first flight.

Pilot Products

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2009

BrightLine Flight Bags There’s a place for everything and everything in its place. This expression, which dates back to the early 1800s, certainly rings true.

Test Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2009

GENERAL Unless contraindicated by the pilot’s operating handbook, what are the first and immediate steps that should be taken by a pilot who experiences an in-flight engine fire? At what altitude is a passenger required to use supplemental oxygen in a nonpressurized aircraft? From reader Alasdair Halleron: What was the first jet-powered airliner to fly in the United States? From reader Charles Baumann: In the early days of jets, several Soviet jet fighters had a prominent, vertical, white stripe in the center of the instrument panel. What was its purpose? From reader Mike Piccola: Who was first to conceive and sketch a parachute? From reader Richard Wilsher: Name the four different types of aircraft that have each given 50 years of continuous service to the military branch to which it was originally assigned.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2007

New LSAs create a stir at Oshkosh Cessna Aircraft and Cirrus Design both put their stamps on the light sport aircraft (LSA) movement by unveiling new aircraft at EAA AirVenture in July. Cessna filled a gap in its sequence of aircraft with the introduction of the 162 SkyCatcher.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2006

KITTY HAWK, DECEMBER, NINETEEN-THREE "They read the work ofLilienthal, Langley, and ChanuteBut the theories of these pioneersIn test did not computeSo they cleaned the table to the woodAnd started in again To answer twisting riddlesSo the sky would let them in." So go the lyrics of the song Kitty Hawk, December Nineteen-Three, by Livingston Taylor. Raised in North Carolina, the poignantly poetic 55-year-old singer/songwriter/aviator has an understandable draw to the Wright brothers and their work, which put his home state on the map.

SIPA S-200 Minijet

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2006

But very few of these petite little jets were ever made The French SIPA S-200 Minijet was the world's first civilian turbojet airplane to enter production. Moreover, it was the world's first VLJ (very light jet).