Turbine

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It's Go Time

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2012

Sometimes the best takeoff decision is to keep going

Hawker 4000: Lots to offer, but too late?

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2012

With its Viper-spun composite fuselage and Honeywell Epic panel, the Hawker 4000 is one of the most advanced business jets flying. Even nearly a decade late entering service, it still stands out as a highly capable super-midsize airplane. The real question is: Will Hawker Beechcraft survive long enough to leverage the enormous investment it has made in the new model?

L–39: Cool flying. 'Nuff said.

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2012

We take you up in the L–39 and also give you some insights on how to manage those expensive turbine engines...and a lot more

For Pax Sake

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2012

Beyond-the-basics tips for making your passengers comfortable.

FARs for jets

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2012

As if a pilot flying a jet for the first time didn't have enough to learn--what with all the new systems, aerodynamics, and performance topics to master--there also are new (to the transitioning pilot, that is) FARs with which to become familiar.

Turbine market shows mixed signals

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2012

Manufacturing officials look for signs of recovery.

ISA and Cruise Planning

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2012

Jet pilots quickly learn that when it comes to cruise planning, higher is almost always better. Ignoring a very small increase in engine efficiency at high altitude, jets cruise at an indicated airspeed that is solely a function of fuel flow.

Turbine Logbook

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2012

What do turbine aircraft buyers consider when evaluating one aircraft versus another? My experience suggests that motivations have changed over time and will continue to evolve.

Showdown

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2012

Until the HondaJet, Cessna's new Citation M2, the Cirrus Vision SF50, the Diamond D-JET, or the new Eclipse 550 enter the light-jet arena, there will be just two serious competitors in the market for new light jets under $4 million: Cessna's Citation Mustang and Embraer's Phenom 100.

Light Jet Face-off

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2012

While the skies have not been darkened by an overcast of very light jets, as some predicted nearly a decade ago, light jets have definitely created a sustainable niche since the introduction of the Cessna Citation Mustang in 2007. The Embraer Phenom 100 came along less than 18 months later, with the Brazilian company placing a firm stake in the single-pilot jet market.

Iced up and fast

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2012

Winter operations in light jets present a series of problems not encountered during fair weather. Most are related to the chance of encountering in-flight icing, and the associated risks of operating a contaminated aircraft.

Turbine Logbook

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2012

What do turbine aircraft buyers consider when evaluating one aircraft versus another? My experience suggests that motivations have changed over time and will continue to evolve.

Fueling traps

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2012

I'll be the first to admit that I've been a bit lazy during an aircraft fueling or two. The fact is that airplanes have caught on fire, run out of fuel, received contaminated fuel, or been overfueled countless times because of improper management and oversight of aircraft fueling by the flight crew. Here are two recent experiences that emphasize crew responsibilities when fueling aircraft.

Cessna's Conquest of the turboprop market

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2012

AOPA owned a Cessna Conquest for some 20 years starting in the early 1980s. It was the first turbine airplane I ever flew.

Mentoring matters

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2012

International flying poses challenges to the pilot only accustomed to domestic flight. Differences in IFR procedure design, ATC, and flight planning all require adjustment from normal routine. One issue that has proven especially troubling is that of varying transition altitudes and levels found outside North America.

Flair in the flare

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2012

In all the years I've been flying corporate jet aircraft, one truth keeps coming through: You can fly a perfect flight every time and no one says a thing, but botch a landing and no one will ever forget. So I've given a lot of thought to the flare, judging your projected touchdown spot, and just what you should and should not do in order to carry out a smooth jet landing.

Going single

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2012

Funny how things change. There was a time not long ago when the notion of flying a single-engine anything in serious instrument weather—and especially for commercial operations—was unthinkable, or at least unlikely.

System Synopsis

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2011

Aircraft designers pray at the altar of system redundancy, so virtually all essential aircraft systems come with backups. Of course, that goes double for twins—especially turbine-powered twins. But what about a failure of a single-engine turboprop's sole fuel control unit (FCU)? If it decides to go belly-up the engine will rapidly spool down and summarily quit. Among other cues, you'll detect the onset of an FCU failure by observing drops in the torque, fuel flow, and gas generator rpm. The engine noise level will also be a clue.

Make it an easy transition

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2011

No company has built more business jets than Cessna. And while the market has been hard on all used business jets these past couple of years, the Citations have held up as well as any. With the used market beginning to firm up a bit, the time is right to consider a business jet before the best of the lot are gone. The lighter end of the Cessna CJ line - CJs, CJ1s, and CJ2s - can provide great value and, with their respectable flying habits, make for an easy transition to those new to turbines. Light jet expert Cyrus Sigari explores just how versatile the CJ fleet is in "The Deal on CJs,".

Mentoring matters

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2011

It's common knowledge that things happen quickly in jets. Starting an approach in a light jet at 180 knots obviously requires much faster thinking to maintain situational awareness than does the same approach in a single-engine piston at 90 knots. While this reality certainly challenges transitioning jet pilots, what's often even more challenging than the fact that things happen quickly is the fact that the pilot needs to make things happen even more quickly.

The deal on CJs

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2011

The Cessna model 525 CitationJet, first delivered in 1993, was a fresh design that replaced the venerable Citation I in the single-pilot, entry level jet niche. The "CJ" was an immediate success and became the foundation for Cessna’s light-jet line. In today’s market conditions, buyers can pick up a five- to 10-year-old, like-new, single-pilot "legacy" CitationJet CJ1 or CJ2 for roughly half the price of the equivalent 525 from the current line.

Jet or turboprop?

Article | Nov 01, 2011

Entry-level jets were so tempting to Jeffrey Brausch, a member of the Air Safety Institute Board of Visitors, that he looked at nearly every offering on the market. When decision time came in 1999, the model he wanted most was the one he already owned, a pristine 1981 Piper Cheyenne II XL.