Turbine

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Turbine Pilot: Britain to Brazil

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2011

With its first foray into light business jets, Embraer has created quite a phenomenon with its Phenom 100 and 300. With aggressive pricing and quality products, the Brazilian manufacturer has sucked up remarkable market share in the very light and light jet segment.

Waypoints

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2011

The majesty of Denali’s north slope filled the Turbine Otter’s windscreen. Thin, wispy clouds obscured the summit of North America’s highest peak, making it appear even more majestic among nearby competing mountains, Mount Foraker and Mount Hunter.

Turbine Pilot: Market scan

Article | Jun 01, 2011

As our directory of single-pilot turbine airplanes showcases, the choices for stepping up to light turbines are vast, from single-engine turboprops to monster twin turboprops (the King Air 350i tips the scales at more than 15,000 pounds) to light and medium-size twinjets. The choices are varied and broad, however the taxiway to light turbine certification is littered with failed or sputtering projects—Adam A700, Emivest, Spectrum, Visionaire, and many others.

Turbine pilot 2011 directory

Article | Jun 01, 2011

With 2011 came a few rays of much-needed hope in the new light-jet and turboprop market segments. Inventories of used airplanes were on the decrease—traditionally a sign that prospective buyers will begin to consider buying new aircraft.

Logbook entry

Article | Jun 01, 2011

The general aviation manufacturing industry has experienced a lot of turbulence in the last two and one-half years as a result of the global economic downturn and the media’s perception of business aviation. But, optimism is returning.

Turbine Pilot: Go down and slow down? Good luck

Article | May 01, 2011

Slippery. Perhaps more than any other one skill, the transition from piston airplanes to turbines requires the pilot to learn the art of descent planning and, really, energy management.

Logbook entry

Article | May 01, 2011

Here’s a thought your boss—who may not receive AOPA Turbine Pilot—might not come up with on his or her own. If you’ve been wondering when and how to move up from your present turbine aircraft, get ready to push those throttles forward.

Mitsubishi MU–2: Addictive performance

Article | May 01, 2011

Mitsubishi’s entrant to the American general aviation scene in the late 1960s—the MU–2 twin turboprop—was a cutting-edge airplane that, performance-wise, blew the doors off the competition. At the time, the Beech King Air 90 couldn’t come close to the speedy Japanese newcomer.

System Synopsis: The new redline

Article | May 01, 2011

While an MU–2 can certainly cruise faster than 300 KTAS, its ASI redline (right) is set at 250 KIAS. This prevents overspeeds at low altitudes.

Turbine Pilot: Making the turbine transition

Article | Apr 01, 2011

Last year at the NBAA convention in Atlanta and AOPA Aviation Summit in Long Beach, I moderated panels on moving up to turbine airplanes. The seminar was part of the Light Business Aircraft series of forums co-hosted by the two associations at their respective conventions.

Logbook entry

Article | Apr 01, 2011

At SimCom, we have the opportunity to talk with almost 10,000 pilots a year who are receiving simulator-based training. The views and opinions of this rather large population, when carefully listened to, serve as a good leading indicator for the general aviation market as a whole.

Mentoring Matters

Article | Apr 01, 2011

Ask a first-time jet pilot halfway through his simulator training what he finds to be the most difficult approach to fly, and you may get one of several answers. A single-engine hand-flown ILS, a circle to land, or maybe a full NDB approach—depending on the aircraft in question and the pilot’s strengths and weaknesses, any of a number of approaches is likely to prove most vexing.

V2 variables

Article | Apr 01, 2011

Click the image for a larger version. Many of the new V-speeds taught to first-time jet pilots are only used in the event of an engine failure.

Turbine Pilot: Special editions

Article | Mar 01, 2011

Welcome to the third monthly issue of our AOPA Pilot Turbine Pilot Special Editions. Throughout 2010 we sent you Turbine Pilot Special Editions on a quarterly basis.

Mission ready

Article | Mar 01, 2011

Small red cameras record the markman's accuracy. When the AS350 AStar was introduced in 1977, its design and manufacture led the industry with extensive use of advanced polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins.

Logbook entry

Article | Mar 01, 2011

Compiling business jet and turboprop accident statistics has been an objective of mine since the early 1960s. When I was a Navy carrier pilot and safety officer—and later a Pan Am pilot—I met an insurance executive who was concerned about insuring the new business jets and turboprops being bought by corporations.

Mentoring Matters

Article | Mar 01, 2011

Some of the issues new jet pilots must confront fall squarely into the category of “nice problem to have.” Looming large among these is the need to control the airspeed of a machine that is endowed with quite a bit more power relative to its weight than any piston aircraft, and even most turboprops. Between performance and regulatory limits, a jet pilot needs to be much more on top of airspeed than his piston brethren.

Ronnie Morgan

Article | Mar 01, 2011

When you build luxury apartments in cities coast to coast, there is an obvious need to travel. That used to scare Ronnie Morgan, who operates half of The Morgan Group from San Diego while his brother manages the headquarters in Houston.

System synopsis: Bleed air malfunctions

Article | Mar 01, 2011

Engine bleed air systems can vary widely in design and operation from one airplane type to another, but they all perform the same basic group of functions. Bleed air pressurizes the cabin, heats and cools the cabin, provides heat for ice-protection systems, and even inflates door seals.

Logbook entry

Article | Feb 01, 2011

Defend, innovate, grow. This is the rally call we’ve adopted at Cessna as we work through one of the most devastating down cycles in our company’s 83 years in business.

To simulate, or not to simulate

Article | Feb 01, 2011

Photography by Mike Fizer In 2005 the Air Transport Association warned Congress that “very light jets” (VLJ) raised the possibility of new safety risks. One of those was the training of pilots.

Turbine Pilot: Special editions

Article | Feb 01, 2011

Welcome to the second monthly issue of our AOPA Pilot Turbine Pilot Special Editions. Throughout 2010 we sent you Turbine Pilot Special Editions on a quarterly basis.

Understanding V1

Article | Feb 01, 2011

One of the many things a first-time jet pilot learns in training is a set of entirely new speeds—V1, V2, and VREF just being a few. To make the issue even more complex, different manufacturers sometimes call the same speed by different names; what Embraer calls VFS, Cessna calls VENR.

Trials and travails of the SJ30

Article | Jan 01, 2011

Owners of Emivest Aerospace hope a new investor will be found by the time you read this, and that the SJ30 business jet company can emerge from bankruptcy stronger than ever. The question now is, how did the troubled jet company get in trouble in the first place? Turbine Edition Table of Contents Editor in Chief Tom Haines on AOPA Pilot's Turbine editions JetPROP DLX: PA-46 Pump-Up Aircraft Inspections: You Have Choices Spoiler Alert Systems Synopsis Logbook Entry: Commentary A fast answer is that Emivest owners, based in Dubai, did everything right but had their money tied up in banks in Dubai and investment firms in New York that failed after 2008 in the current recession.

Spoiler alert

Article | Jan 01, 2011

Turbofan airplanes are so aerodynamically clean that pilots can have difficulty slowing down and going down, especially at the same time. These aircraft do not have the drag created by windmilling propellers, which is why they typically have twice the glide ratios of piston aircraft.