Turbine

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Logbook entry

Article | Apr 01, 2011

At SimCom, we have the opportunity to talk with almost 10,000 pilots a year who are receiving simulator-based training. The views and opinions of this rather large population, when carefully listened to, serve as a good leading indicator for the general aviation market as a whole.

Mentoring Matters

Article | Apr 01, 2011

Ask a first-time jet pilot halfway through his simulator training what he finds to be the most difficult approach to fly, and you may get one of several answers. A single-engine hand-flown ILS, a circle to land, or maybe a full NDB approach—depending on the aircraft in question and the pilot’s strengths and weaknesses, any of a number of approaches is likely to prove most vexing.

V2 variables

Article | Apr 01, 2011

Click the image for a larger version. Many of the new V-speeds taught to first-time jet pilots are only used in the event of an engine failure.

Turbine Pilot: Special editions

Article | Mar 01, 2011

Welcome to the third monthly issue of our AOPA Pilot Turbine Pilot Special Editions. Throughout 2010 we sent you Turbine Pilot Special Editions on a quarterly basis.

Mission ready

Article | Mar 01, 2011

Small red cameras record the markman's accuracy. When the AS350 AStar was introduced in 1977, its design and manufacture led the industry with extensive use of advanced polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins.

Logbook entry

Article | Mar 01, 2011

Compiling business jet and turboprop accident statistics has been an objective of mine since the early 1960s. When I was a Navy carrier pilot and safety officer—and later a Pan Am pilot—I met an insurance executive who was concerned about insuring the new business jets and turboprops being bought by corporations.

Mentoring Matters

Article | Mar 01, 2011

Some of the issues new jet pilots must confront fall squarely into the category of “nice problem to have.” Looming large among these is the need to control the airspeed of a machine that is endowed with quite a bit more power relative to its weight than any piston aircraft, and even most turboprops. Between performance and regulatory limits, a jet pilot needs to be much more on top of airspeed than his piston brethren.

Ronnie Morgan

Article | Mar 01, 2011

When you build luxury apartments in cities coast to coast, there is an obvious need to travel. That used to scare Ronnie Morgan, who operates half of The Morgan Group from San Diego while his brother manages the headquarters in Houston.

System synopsis: Bleed air malfunctions

Article | Mar 01, 2011

Engine bleed air systems can vary widely in design and operation from one airplane type to another, but they all perform the same basic group of functions. Bleed air pressurizes the cabin, heats and cools the cabin, provides heat for ice-protection systems, and even inflates door seals.

Turbine Pilot: Special editions

Article | Feb 01, 2011

Welcome to the second monthly issue of our AOPA Pilot Turbine Pilot Special Editions. Throughout 2010 we sent you Turbine Pilot Special Editions on a quarterly basis.

Logbook entry

Article | Feb 01, 2011

Defend, innovate, grow. This is the rally call we’ve adopted at Cessna as we work through one of the most devastating down cycles in our company’s 83 years in business.

To simulate, or not to simulate

Article | Feb 01, 2011

Photography by Mike Fizer In 2005 the Air Transport Association warned Congress that “very light jets” (VLJ) raised the possibility of new safety risks. One of those was the training of pilots.

Understanding V1

Article | Feb 01, 2011

One of the many things a first-time jet pilot learns in training is a set of entirely new speeds—V1, V2, and VREF just being a few. To make the issue even more complex, different manufacturers sometimes call the same speed by different names; what Embraer calls VFS, Cessna calls VENR.

Turbine Pilot: Special editions

Article | Jan 01, 2011

Welcome to the first monthly issue of our AOPA Pilot Turbine Pilot Special Editions. Throughout 2010 we sent you Turbine Pilot Special Editions on a quarterly basis.

Logbook Entry

Article | Jan 01, 2011

The fractional (frax) aircraft ownership industry at large has been a strong catalyst for improvements in aircraft, service, and support systems that benefit both the business and general aviation communities. Large standardized fleets with high annual aircraft utilization and strong demands for reliability create an operational environment that fosters accelerated learning and continuous improvement for fractional service providers and the vendors that support them.

JetPROP DLX: PA-46 pump-up

Article | Jan 01, 2011

Piper’s PA-46 Malibu/Mirage series of large piston singles burst onto the stage in 1984 and went on to become a major success. These airplanes had the sleek looks that their immediate predecessors, the PA-32 Saratogas, lacked in spades.

Aircraft inspections: You have choices

Article | Jan 01, 2011

Life changes when you acquire a turbine-powered aircraft. Now you’re flying higher, faster, and probably farther than you ever did in your piston-powered days.

Trials and travails of the SJ30

Article | Jan 01, 2011

Owners of Emivest Aerospace hope a new investor will be found by the time you read this, and that the SJ30 business jet company can emerge from bankruptcy stronger than ever. The question now is, how did the troubled jet company get in trouble in the first place? Turbine Edition Table of Contents Editor in Chief Tom Haines on AOPA Pilot's Turbine editions JetPROP DLX: PA-46 Pump-Up Aircraft Inspections: You Have Choices Spoiler Alert Systems Synopsis Logbook Entry: Commentary A fast answer is that Emivest owners, based in Dubai, did everything right but had their money tied up in banks in Dubai and investment firms in New York that failed after 2008 in the current recession.

Spoiler alert

Article | Jan 01, 2011

Turbofan airplanes are so aerodynamically clean that pilots can have difficulty slowing down and going down, especially at the same time. These aircraft do not have the drag created by windmilling propellers, which is why they typically have twice the glide ratios of piston aircraft.

Robinson R66: Triple crown

Article | Dec 01, 2010

“Affordable” is not a word that is often associated with helicopters. However, for one aeronautical engineer, it is a tenet of his design philosophy.

What It Looks Like: Heated brakes

Article | Dec 01, 2010

The approach was icy, and after landing you notice that you’re taxiing in slush. So far, so good.

CJ4 debut

Article | Dec 01, 2010

Cessna’s new Citation CJ4 takes the company’s CJ line one step closer to the midsize business jet category. The CJ4, announced in 2006, is the seventh of the CJ series (eighth, if you count the Mustang) and offers more in every department: power, speed, cabin size, and plenty of equipment that ordinarily would be optional.

A path worth taking

Article | Dec 01, 2010

“Every cloud has a silver lining” sounds like a bad cliché in today’s troubled economy. But the atmosphere for deal making has never been better.

Lots of new products in development

Article | Dec 01, 2010

The recession was the elephant in the room at the Atlanta convention of the National Business Aviation Association in October, where manufacturers talked mostly about life after the recession and products they will deliver. Some of the news stories were about predicting the start of the recovery, with three companies agreeing on the year 2012.

What to expect when you step up

Article | Dec 01, 2010

Turboprop airplanes are simpler in some ways than pistons, although the environment in which turboprops operate opens up a whole new world of requirements and knowledge. And then there’s the complexity of the machines themselves in terms of systems.