Turbine

Items per page   10 | 25 | 50 | 100
101 to 125 of 411 results

JetPROP DLX: PA-46 pump-up

Article | Jan 01, 2011

Piper’s PA-46 Malibu/Mirage series of large piston singles burst onto the stage in 1984 and went on to become a major success. These airplanes had the sleek looks that their immediate predecessors, the PA-32 Saratogas, lacked in spades.

Aircraft inspections: You have choices

Article | Jan 01, 2011

Life changes when you acquire a turbine-powered aircraft. Now you’re flying higher, faster, and probably farther than you ever did in your piston-powered days.

Trials and travails of the SJ30

Article | Jan 01, 2011

Owners of Emivest Aerospace hope a new investor will be found by the time you read this, and that the SJ30 business jet company can emerge from bankruptcy stronger than ever. The question now is, how did the troubled jet company get in trouble in the first place? Turbine Edition Table of Contents Editor in Chief Tom Haines on AOPA Pilot's Turbine editions JetPROP DLX: PA-46 Pump-Up Aircraft Inspections: You Have Choices Spoiler Alert Systems Synopsis Logbook Entry: Commentary A fast answer is that Emivest owners, based in Dubai, did everything right but had their money tied up in banks in Dubai and investment firms in New York that failed after 2008 in the current recession.

Spoiler alert

Article | Jan 01, 2011

Turbofan airplanes are so aerodynamically clean that pilots can have difficulty slowing down and going down, especially at the same time. These aircraft do not have the drag created by windmilling propellers, which is why they typically have twice the glide ratios of piston aircraft.

Robinson R66: Triple crown

Article | Dec 01, 2010

“Affordable” is not a word that is often associated with helicopters. However, for one aeronautical engineer, it is a tenet of his design philosophy.

What It Looks Like: Heated brakes

Article | Dec 01, 2010

The approach was icy, and after landing you notice that you’re taxiing in slush. So far, so good.

CJ4 debut

Article | Dec 01, 2010

Cessna’s new Citation CJ4 takes the company’s CJ line one step closer to the midsize business jet category. The CJ4, announced in 2006, is the seventh of the CJ series (eighth, if you count the Mustang) and offers more in every department: power, speed, cabin size, and plenty of equipment that ordinarily would be optional.

A path worth taking

Article | Dec 01, 2010

“Every cloud has a silver lining” sounds like a bad cliché in today’s troubled economy. But the atmosphere for deal making has never been better.

Lots of new products in development

Article | Dec 01, 2010

The recession was the elephant in the room at the Atlanta convention of the National Business Aviation Association in October, where manufacturers talked mostly about life after the recession and products they will deliver. Some of the news stories were about predicting the start of the recovery, with three companies agreeing on the year 2012.

What to expect when you step up

Article | Dec 01, 2010

Turboprop airplanes are simpler in some ways than pistons, although the environment in which turboprops operate opens up a whole new world of requirements and knowledge. And then there’s the complexity of the machines themselves in terms of systems.

Yaw dampers

Article | Dec 01, 2010

The term “yaw damper” (not “dampener”) is somewhat of a misnomer in that its purpose is not to reduce yaw. After all, a conventional turn is a yawing and pitching maneuver, and if a yaw damper really did damp or arrest yaw, an airplane equipped with one would not turn very well.

'AOPA Pilot' Online

Article | Oct 01, 2010

The Air Up There Mike Collins loaded up his camera and his notebooks to tackle a tough assignment in the New Mexico desert. He’d have to rise before the sun, look to the skies all day, and maybe even share a glass of mandatory champagne—when you cover the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta, it’s a tough gig.

King Air fuel system: The inside story

Article | Oct 01, 2010

The fuel system used in the C90-series King Airs is designed with simplicity in mind, but the systems’ workings can sound complicated. There are differences among the various C90 models, but their fuel systems share basic similarities—and the same can be said for the fuel systems in the 200- and 300-series King Airs as well.

A way with winglets

Article | Oct 01, 2010

In some circles, it’s become fashionable to refer to the Hawker Beechcraft Corporation (HBC) King Airs as dated and dowdy looking. True, King Airs have been around since 1964, and comparisons with sleeker, newer light business jets do invite judgment.

Flying with the Kings

Article | Oct 01, 2010

Since 1969, John and Martha King—husband and wife and business partners—have experienced the joy of sharing their passion for flying. When I think of married pilots who have somehow managed to work harmoniously together on the ground and in the air, John and Martha King of King Schools quickly come to the top of my very short list.

Mods and mends

Article | Oct 01, 2010

The most surprising thing about flying the latest upgrades to the Eclipse 500 very light jet was just how unfamiliar the airplane was to me two years after earning a type rating in it. I had spent many hours in the Level D simulator, but two years is a long time to be away from an airplane.

'AOPA Pilot' Online

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2010

The Ultimate Cross-Country/Road Trip “Like a band of gypsies, we head on down the highway”—and skyway. It’s the Fun to Fly Road and Runway Rally and our intrepid editors headed south to Sun ’n Fun in an unofficial race that took the meaning out of the word race.

Fear of flameout

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2010

Fuel exhaustion—long known as a leading cause of accidents in light propeller aircraft—also is a real danger in turbine-powered aircraft, even those operated by professional flight crews. It’s even happened to airline crews.

Don’t hold your breath

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2010

With the advent of single-engine turboprops and more entry-level jets, pilots of all experience levels can more often find themselves commanding aircraft above 10,000 feet, which means they open the door to a number of challenges—both physical and operational. Pressure drops Turbine Edition Table of Contents Phenom 300 Debut Don’t Hold Your Breath: Oxygen and Altitude What It Looks Like: Emergency Oxygen Systems Consciousness Countdown: Time of Useful Consciousness Fear of Flameout: How Flying Low Can Rob Endurance Turbine Profile: Robert Luketic One aspect of high-altitude physics—that with altitude, the partial pressure of oxygen is reduced—explains much of why the human body performs so differently at altitude.

Turbine Pilot: Robert Luketic

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2010

In a world of glamour, Hollywood director Robert Luketic has found the antidote. “The responsibility that comes with flying a large powerful machine that must be respected, that takes constant vigilance, and that you can’t be casual about—there’s no glamour in flying a jet.

Phenom 300 debut

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2010

Although American business jet manufacturers are reeling from the recession’s sting, the same can’t be said for Brazil’s Embraer. Sure, sales are down, but Embraer forges ahead with its new line of business jets, racking up sales that mainly take market share from Cessna’s Citations and Hawker Beechcraft’s Hawker jets.

Turbine Pilot: Performance calculations

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2010

Although older jets use a blizzard of paper charts and tables to calculate performance, newer models take advantage of technology to provide more precise and versatile data. Embraer, for example, provides three ways to perform takeoff performance calculations for the new Phenom 100.

Turbine Pilot: Simulating reality

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2010

We’ve sure come a long way since Ed Link invented the first flight simulator with parts from his father’s pipe organ and piano company. Regardless of the levels of virtual reality, one thing’s for sure: Simulators save time, money, and—most important—lives.

Thrust buster: Sierra Super S–II

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2010

Turbine Pilot Special Edition Thrust buster: Sierra’s new Citation Super S–II Go time: Climbing from one takeoff segment to another Performance calculations: One manufacturer’s approach TOLD you so: Calculating takeoff and landing data Flying in the wild, wild West: Where the airplane is an important tool Simulating reality: Tips for acing your next training session Cessna built some 1,700-plus older Cessna Citations, and many of them are still out there paying their way. These are the Citations that established the line as one of the all-time, hands-down bestsellers.

Go time

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2010

Think back to the excitement of your first takeoff. Remember the thrill as you pushed the throttle to the panel and watched the tachometer wind up? The airplane began to rumble and shake, gathering speed until finally it leapt into the sky.