Turbine

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Mark II Cessna 206: The ultimate family truckster

Article | Sep 01, 2011

What was the first turbine single certified in America? Most of us would say the Cessna Caravan, which debuted in 1985. But no. Under a supplemental type certificate (STC) Soloy Aviation Solutions of Olympia, Washington, began modifying Cessna 206s with reverse-flow 417-shaft-horsepower Rolls-Royce/Allison 250-C2 turboshaft engines in 1983. Soloy called this modification the "Mark I" model, and it came fitted with a Soloy-designed and -manufactured propeller-reduction gearbox. In all, 85 Mark I Cessna 206 conversions were built over the years. Soloy’s Mark I kit applies to Cessna 206G and -H models built from 1977 to the present.

(Not) straight-in

Article | Sep 01, 2011

By the time they fly their first jet, most pilots are accomplished at instrument flying. They certainly understand the difference, for example, between a straight-in and circling approach.

Power up, temps down: King Air 250

Article | Aug 01, 2011

In late June, Hawker Beechcraft Corporation (HBC) certified its new King Air 250, a more refined variant of its predecessor, the King Air B200GT. Like all King Airs, the 250 has the classy, comfortable cabin that has made the line the go-to twin turboprop for more than 7,000 customers.

Turbine Pilot: Mods to an end

Article | Aug 01, 2011

A host of modifications transform the once dowdy Beechcraft King Air 200 into a twenty-first century keeper nearly 50 years after the first King Air took flight. Faster, further, sexier.

Mentoring Matters: Where’s that fix?

Article | Aug 01, 2011

The Activate Vectors to Final (VTF) feature on all modern Garmin navigators, from the GNS 400 up to the G1000 and its derivatives, was revolutionary when introduced. Before this feature, when a pilot received vectors for an approach, the steps to properly configure the GPS were numerous and often confusing.

Waypoints

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2011

The majesty of Denali’s north slope filled the Turbine Otter’s windscreen. Thin, wispy clouds obscured the summit of North America’s highest peak, making it appear even more majestic among nearby competing mountains, Mount Foraker and Mount Hunter.

Turbine Pilot: Britain to Brazil

Article | Jul 01, 2011

With its first foray into light business jets, Embraer has created quite a phenomenon with its Phenom 100 and 300. With aggressive pricing and quality products, the Brazilian manufacturer has sucked up remarkable market share in the very light and light jet segment.

Logbook entry

Article | Jun 01, 2011

The general aviation manufacturing industry has experienced a lot of turbulence in the last two and one-half years as a result of the global economic downturn and the media’s perception of business aviation. But, optimism is returning.

Turbine pilot 2011 directory

Article | Jun 01, 2011

With 2011 came a few rays of much-needed hope in the new light-jet and turboprop market segments. Inventories of used airplanes were on the decrease—traditionally a sign that prospective buyers will begin to consider buying new aircraft.

Turbine Pilot: Market scan

Article | Jun 01, 2011

As our directory of single-pilot turbine airplanes showcases, the choices for stepping up to light turbines are vast, from single-engine turboprops to monster twin turboprops (the King Air 350i tips the scales at more than 15,000 pounds) to light and medium-size twinjets. The choices are varied and broad, however the taxiway to light turbine certification is littered with failed or sputtering projects—Adam A700, Emivest, Spectrum, Visionaire, and many others.