Taildragger

Items per page   10 | 25 | 50 | 100
76 to 100 of 127 results

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2005

Three chutes are better than one, company says Ever since Ralph Nader's book Unsafe at Any Speed: The Designed-In Dangers of the American Automobile was published in 1965, the auto industry, prompted by federal laws, has been on a safety kick. General aviation seems to parallel the car business, but innovation takes longer with the lack of numbers to justify mass production and the complex FAA certification process.

Pilot Counsel

Article | Jan 01, 2005

Aviation attorney John S. Yodice has been flying for 34 years and owns a Cessna 310.

GA Entrepreneurs

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2004

Orville Wright didn't have a pilot certificate when he launched from Kill Devil Hills on that first flight in 1903. And Jay and Mary Honeck had no background as hoteliers, nor did Jay Taffet have training as a photographer.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2004

Don't tell John Ball he's unstable. He's heard it all before.

Pilotage

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2004

Mark R. Twombly, a writer, editor, and pilot, now lands on two different runway surfaces.

Spitfire for 2

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2004

When Bill Greenwood of Aspen, Colorado, decided to buy a warbird he was a 450-hour Mooney pilot with zero tailwheel time. He realized that with his limited experience, he would need something a little more docile to fly than most warbirds.

Letters

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2004

Memories of an adventure I just finished reading "Memories of an Adventure" (April Pilot) for the second time and I think you missed the mark with this article. I say this based on my impressions and discussions with two non-taildragger pilots who read the article.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2004

Pilots from six states have trained with Arthur A.C. (Tony) Markl in Marydel, Maryland.

Memories of an Adventure

Article | Apr 01, 2004

Looking for a little adventure? Then American Champion has just the airplane for you — its a Citabria (that's "airbatic" spelled backward) 7GCAA, also known as an Adventure. This past summer, AOPA staff pilots had a chance to spend some time with the airplane the manufacturer calls "a personal toy." And whether they were neophytes with no tailwheel experience or taildragger aficionados, they all agreed that the Adventure lived up to its name.

Flight of a Falcon

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2004

It is not often that a pilot takes off in a single-engine airplane with the intention of shutting down the engine once under way, but that is exactly what you can do when flying an Aeromot AMT-200S Super Ximango. (Ximango means falcon in Portuguese.

AOPA's Centennial of Flight Sweepstakes

Article | Apr 01, 2004

Texas member takes home the grand prize Even three weeks after learning that he was the winner of America's most coveted Waco, Mark Zeller still couldn't believe his luck. "Every night I've been going down there to look at it," said Zeller, AOPA 3835012.

Touchdown!

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2003

It's like a ballet of hands, feet, and head that all pilots perform on every flight. Its procedures aren't on any checklist.

Postcards

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2003

Philadelphia fun during AOPA Expo While this year's AOPA Expo brings general aviation and pilots like you to Philadelphia, no one visits the City of Brotherly Love without soaking up at least some of the area's historic atmosphere. And for the aviation fanatic for whom the exhibits and activities at Expo aren't enough, Philadelphia and its surrounding communities offer attractions that showcase aviation, as well as must-see sights that honor its role in more than three centuries of U.S.

De Havilland DHC-1 Chipmunk

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2003

The Chippie was a favorite of the RAF It is said that the de Havilland DHC-1 Chipmunk looks the way an airplane should look. Designed as a military trainer, the "Chippie" has a tapered wing and a narrow, sleek fuselage that give it the appearance of a petite World War II fighter.

Budget Buys

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2003

When a flying club feels like home A covey of pilots in lawn chairs recline under leafy branches. Their view on this warm evening takes in a cornfield with foot-high stalks waving green, bunches of mint growing in the shade of a white hangar, and the pencil line of pavement that is Runway 15/33 at Nelson Field, home of Green Castle Aero Club, near Oxford, Iowa.

Letters

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2003

Heavy lifter I have just read Thomas Horne's article in AOPA Pilot regarding the Piper Aztec ("Heavy Lifter," March Pilot). I'm the owner of a Piper Aztec C (PA-23-250).

AOPA Centennial of Flight Sweepstakes

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2003

And ready for its new owner C'mon, it's a biplane, not an avionics showroom. Flying doesn't get any more basic than a 1940 Waco UPF-7.

AOPA Centennial of Flight Sweepstakes

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2003

AOPA members dream of hitting the jackpot AOPA members tell us they'd yell, scream, and run to the airport naked (please don't, as we will be videotaping the award ceremony) if they won AOPA's $250,000 Centennial of Flight Sweepstakes Waco UPF-7. Others would play with it until the tax bill arrives — then sell it and keep the $150,000 cash remaining, or sell it right away and buy an airplane that better meets their needs.

Letters

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2003

Becoming a real pilot Phil Boyer's article "You're Not a Real Pilot," appearing in the January issue of AOPA Pilot, was "déjà vu all over again" for me. Last year, after flying tricycle-gear-equipped aircraft for 25 years, I received my taildragger endorsement in a 1946 Piper PA-12 Super Cruiser.

Proficient Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2003

Retired airline captain Barry Schiff has logged more than 26,000 hours in 275 types of aircraft. When taildragger pilots gather at their local watering hole for post-flight imbibing, they occasionally engage in that ageless debate about whether the wheel landing is superior to the three-point, or vice versa.

Waypoints

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2003

AOPA Pilot Editor in Chief Thomas B. Haines has landed on everything from skis to skids in his flying career.

AOPA Centennial of Flight Sweepstakes

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2003

Or how I learned to fly a taildragger Throughout my 35 years of private flying I have consistently been admonished by fellow pilots that "you're not a real pilot until you have flown a taildragger." I hate to admit it, but during my entire flying career, accumulating more than 6,500 hours, I have never logged any time in a tailwheel-equipped airplane. Don't be too quick to criticize me, since I am probably the typical private pilot who learned to fly in the past three or four decades.

Back to Basics

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2002

Fifty miles southeast of Washington, D.C., where the Patuxent River meets the Chesapeake Bay, a U.S. Navy aviation officer crosses the ramp at the Navy's Test Pilot School.

Budget Buys

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2001

A little airplane that could Born in poverty, nurtured in adversity, and forced from production by the machinations of an egocentric airline president, the Piper Clipper nevertheless persevered because it was a good, simple airplane. Spartan, small, and cheaply built, but surprisingly pleasant to fly, its backseat introduced more than a few young baby boomers to the world of flight.

Letters

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2001

Day-tripper I really enjoyed "Budget Buys: Day-Tripper" (July Pilot) about the Piper Tomahawk. Finally, someone did an honest evaluation of this fine little airplane.