Taildragger

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Greg Koontz wins airshow performer award

Article | Jul 11, 2014

Greg Koontz, who performs amazing aerobatics in a Super Decathlon available to the average pilot, is the 2014 Bill Barber airshow performer of the year.

P&E Technique: Tipping point

Pilot Magazine | May 14, 2014

I bear on my forearman enduring reminder of the fallibilities of three-wheel vehicles.

XtremeAir ready for demos

Article | Apr 10, 2014

A Florida flight school dove into airplane dealership when the opportunity to handle a new and aerobatic star came along last fall.

Sherpa Aircraft deal with Chinese investor fails

Article | Apr 03, 2014

A deal announced in January 2013 for an infusion of cash from a Chinese investor to certify the Sherpa 650T utility tailwheel aircraft has failed.

Tailwheel tango: 'Dance on the rudders'

Article | Jan 30, 2014

Tailwheel aircraft aren’t as forgiving of bad technique as nosewheel airplanes, causing trouble during transition training for pilots with sloppy footwork.

Rotorcraft Rookie: Helicopter flight controls

Rotorcraft Rookie | Nov 27, 2013

If you are going to learn to fly a helicopter you first have to learn how to control it.

No more ground loops, Beringer says

Article | Aug 01, 2013

Beringer Wheels and Brakes is developing a new tailwheel that promises ground-loop-free landings for taildragger pilots. The company explains that its double-pivot tailwheel can be made to move as the rudder moves.

Technique: All the way to the chocks

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2013

The windsock indicated a direct and very strong crosswind as the clipped-wing J–3 Cub touched down on the runway. The pilot, Jimmy Gist, was doing a masterful job of putting the feather-light airplane down on its main wheels and tracking the centerline despite the stiff winter wind.

Technique: The third wheel

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2013

For such a tiny part of the airplane, the third wheel of a taildragger has a vicious bite if it's not treated with proper respect. "You can't get lazy in a tailwheel," instructor Ron Rapp explained early in 5G Aviation's tailwheel endorsement training program at Southern California's John Wayne Airport-Orange County.

Club Spotlight

Article | May 13, 2013

The Bowman Eagles was formed 10 years ago for one purpose--to have tailwheel aircraft available to fly.

Club Spotlight: Flabob Aero Club

Article | Feb 13, 2013

The club’s 1946 J-3 Cub The Flabob Aero Club has been operating for about three years and grown quickly with more than 100 members. Its relationship with the non-profit Wathen Center provides extremely low costs, and the club operates an interesting mix of aircraft.

Don't let the ground loop get you

Article | Jan 17, 2013

The sense of being powerless in an aircraft is terrifying. Pilots are trained to control the airplane and correct dangerous situations that arise. But in this developed, low-speed ground loop demonstration, I'm powerless. Applying full right rudder during the uncontrolled left turn yields no results. Brakes are no help.

Letters

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2013

letters.html A former AOPA vice president of public relations, Charles Spence, celebrated the life of William Piper Sr. on the seventy-fifth anniversary of Piper Aircraft.

Proficient Pilot: Playing favorites

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2013

I've never met an airplane I didn't like

Found Aircraft lands certificates for three variants

Article | Oct 17, 2012

Found Aircraft added turbocharging and a taildragger configuration, and landed certificates for three new variations on the Expedition (formerly the Expedition 350) - an aircraft built for back country and big city flying.

Husky out of hiding

Article | Oct 01, 2012

The AOPA Tougher Than a Tornado Sweepstakes Husky will emerge from its undisclosed location for AOPA Aviation Summit in Palm Springs, Calif., where AOPA will reveal the new owner of the rugged taildragger.

Topsy-turvy course hooks lifetime flyers, customers

Article | Jul 11, 2012

In the skies over northern Massachusetts, generations of pilots have taken their first taste of a world turned upside down, an introduction to flight inverted that leaves a lasting impression. Many have gone on to learn aerobatics, or get a taildragger endorsement: this kind of flying is pure fun. There's also a serious purpose behind unusual attitude training--just ask any small airplane pilot who has been caught in the wake vortex of an airliner. Learning to master spins, and spin recovery, is another step to building confidence as a pilot, and the skills needed to stay in control no matter what.

Safety Pilot: Transitions

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2012

“Hey, if it’s got wings, I can fly it.” Well, maybe. With the jet age, some airline pilots had to retire early because they couldn’t make the transition.

From first ride to 2nd Lt.

Article | Jun 11, 2012

After a ride in a family friend's Cessna 172 instilled a lifelong fascination with aviation in 6-year-old Nicholas DeLuca, the youngster set his sights on the goal of becoming a fighter pilot.

Letters

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2012

Editor at Large Tom Horne and Senior Editor Dave Hirschman debated the merits of expensive analog versus cheap digital watches in their last “Dogfight.” “I still have my solid-gold, 12-diamond Rolex, which I wear when I feel the need to impress folks who value style over substance. BTW, I bought it for $12 from a street vendor in Philadelphia.” John Corradi, AOPA 2656039Rixeyville, Virginia I have to agree with Tom Horne: Anything mechanical, or even anything man-made, with parts that fit together and function with elegant synchronicity is inherently beautiful (“Dogfight,” April 2012).

Letters

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2012

Mike Collins touched my heart with his article "Honoring the Tuskegee Airmen" (December 2011 AOPA Pilot). Lt. Col. William Holloman III of the famed 332nd Fighter Group was a dear friend and passed away in 2010. Bill was a national treasure. Prior to his passing, he was looking forward to climbing back into a Stearman.

Tecnam taildragger makes first flight

Article | Jan 17, 2012

Tecnam taildragger makes first flight

Dogfight | The perfect trainer

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2012

What's the best primary trainer? That's easy--it's a Cessna 150 or 152. This series of airplanes has proven its worth as trainers for decades, having churned out a huge chunk of the general aviation pilot population. In the glory days of the 1960s and 1970s, Cessna's Pilot Centers built a hugely successful training program around the Cessna 150. Why is that, you ask?

Affordable aerobat

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2012

Pitts biplanes dominated U.S. and international aerobatic competition in the 1960s and 1970s before eventually being eclipsed by bigger, faster, more powerful monoplanes in the late 1980s and beyond.

Training topics

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2012

Say "online training course" and most people think of countless hours staring at a computer screen while a pleasant-sounding voice drones on about the topic. Jeppesen's new G1000 VFR, IFR, and VFR/IFR online training courses couldn't be more different. These courses are well worth the time and money.

The Maine Event

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2011

The AOPA 2012 Sweepstakes "Tougher Than a Tornado" Husky can seem as out of place at a big airport as a monster truck on the streets of Manhattan. The Husky was designed and built in Wyoming for flying throughout the rugged and expansive West - so what happens if its eventual winner is an East Coast city slicker? Could an airplane optimized for rough, high-altitude airports be useful in other regions where elevations are low, distances are short, and paved airports are plentiful?

The lady loves taildraggers

Article | Feb 01, 2011

Judy Birchler has loved tailwheel aircraft since she learned to fly in an Aeronca Chief 38 years ago. She wanted to know if there were other women who felt the same way. So she set out to create a like-minded community with the Ladies Love Taildraggers website.

Letters

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2011

I can’t think of enough superlatives to describe the astonishing scenery and the gorgeous airplane photography gracing Dave Hirschman’s November 2010 article, “Epic Flights: Coastal Maine in Autumn” in AOPA Pilot. But, I am at a complete loss as to why the front seat of that Waco YMF–5C didn’t have at least one body in it.

Cross-country in a Cub

Article | Dec 01, 2010

Noting the minus-20 degrees Fahrenheit temperature outside and the jagged peaks all around, I asked myself—not for the first time on this journey—What is a flatlander from South Florida doing in the middle of winter flying a light sport Cub through the Rocky Mountains? I found myself grinning ear to ear at my response: Having a ball and rediscovering the art of real flying! After 28 years and more than 3,000 hours of flying between the Bahamas and the southeastern United States, I parted with my trusty 1973 Cessna 310. The trigger for that decision: an Alaskan fishing trip to the Tikchik Lodge that awoke a new spirit of flying in me when a guide landed his Super Cub on the gravel bar at one of our river camps.

Landing Insights

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2010

Fair or not, like it or not, your skill at landing an airplane is your most heavily judged piloting task. You might be a great flight planner, a maestro at fuel management, or a whiz at understanding weather, but all that takes a back seat to your competence when rubber meets the runway.

Tin Goose

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2010

Personal letters arriving in the U.S. mail are so rare these days that when one arrives it’s guaranteed to draw my attention.

Proficient Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2010

I have celebrated 71 years on Earth, including 27,000 hours above it. Spending the equivalent of three years in a cockpit nurtures a perspective that gives one the right to reflect on events aeronautical with some credibility.

A staggering accomplishment

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2008

Walter Beech must have been well pleased as he sat in his office on August 23, 1938, catching up on paperwork. The tremendous risk he’d taken back in 1932—starting his own aircraft company in the deepening worldwide economic depression—was paying off.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2008

Aquatic life blocks Florida airport Tropical Storm Fay threw a new challenge at Melbourne International Airport staff in late August. A routine check of the airport’s runway for debris turned up two gopher tortoises, four walking catfish, an alligator, and a blue indigo snake.

Short Matters

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2008

There’s an island in the French West Indies where the jetsetters play, but you can’t land a jet there. It’s called Saint Barthélemy —St.

AOPA ePilot Custom Content

Article | Aug 01, 2008

The following stories from the August 1, 2008, edition of AOPA ePilot were provided to AOPA members who expressed an interest in the particular subject areas. Any AOPA member can receive information tailored to their areas of interest by updating their preferences online.

Technique: I Wear My Sunglasses at Night

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2008

The cold night wind swirls through the rear cockpit of the Waco YMF Super as I tuck my chin, turtle-like, into the warmth of my jacket’s upturned collar. I’ve flown this gorgeous biplane around the Atlanta area countless times in the last five years in my weekend job as a scenic rides pilot.

Childhood Dreams

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2008

“I’ve been infatuated with airplanes since I was really, really little.” Super Corsair owner Robert Odegaard says. One of his earliest memories is when he was about two or three years old, running from his mother’s arms to the living room window for a better view of a noisy yellow Stearman, spraying the family’s fields near Fargo, North Dakota.

Safety Pilot: Deja vu: 50 years of mishaps

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2008

Bruce Landsberg was named executive director of ASF in 1992. In looking back at nearly 50 years of general aviation accident reporting, what is surprising is how few surprises there are.

Light Sport Aircraft

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2007

Or maybe it's a Citabria-Champ Ladies and gentlemen, now entering the ring, wearing any of 20 colors, weighing 1,320 pounds, from Rochester, Wisconsin...the Champ! Florida dealer Larry Tague even paints boxing gloves on the tail. The American Champion 7EC Champ — certified under the old CAR 4 rules — is re-entering the market as a light sport aircraft, and thus has a 1,320-pound gross weight limitation.