Turboprop

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Turbine Logbook

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2012

What do turbine aircraft buyers consider when evaluating one aircraft versus another? My experience suggests that motivations have changed over time and will continue to evolve.

Iced up and fast

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2012

Winter operations in light jets present a series of problems not encountered during fair weather. Most are related to the chance of encountering in-flight icing, and the associated risks of operating a contaminated aircraft.

Kestrel Aircraft to move to Wisconsin

Article | Jan 16, 2012

Kestrel Aircraft will build its single-engine turboprop aircraft in Superior, Wis., instead of Maine, the company announced Jan. 16.

Cirrus focused on Vision jet

Article | Jan 06, 2012

Cirrus Aircraft officials say they are making steady progress on their SF50 Vision jet program and the prototype has logged more than 700 flight test hours since its first flight in 2008.

Going single

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2012

Funny how things change. There was a time not long ago when the notion of flying a single-engine anything in serious instrument weather—and especially for commercial operations—was unthinkable, or at least unlikely.

Daher-Socata TBM 850: Top-of-the-line T-prop

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2012

Don't look now, but Daher-Socata's TBM series of single-engine turboprops is officially 26 years old. The airplane that began life on engineer Denis LeGrand's drafting board at Socata's facility in Tarbes, France, in December 1986, came to fruition under a partnership with Mooney Aircraft Company in the late 1980s, and had its first delivery in 1990 is now considered by many the ultimate personal turboprop. The recent delivery of the six-hundredth TBM--a TBM 850 model featuring Garmin's G1000 avionics suite--underscores the brand's enduring popularity.

System Synopsis

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2011

Aircraft designers pray at the altar of system redundancy, so virtually all essential aircraft systems come with backups. Of course, that goes double for twins—especially turbine-powered twins. But what about a failure of a single-engine turboprop's sole fuel control unit (FCU)? If it decides to go belly-up the engine will rapidly spool down and summarily quit. Among other cues, you'll detect the onset of an FCU failure by observing drops in the torque, fuel flow, and gas generator rpm. The engine noise level will also be a clue.

Consolidation of knowledge

Article | Nov 01, 2011

There are a number of witty phrases used among pilots to refer to the often-intense nature of turbine aircraft training courses. "Drinking from a fire hose" is particularly descriptive, as anyone who's ever taken an accelerated type-rating course can attest. Earning a type rating is no small achievement for any pilot, from the airline veteran whose certificate is bulging with multiple type ratings to the newest light-jet pilot earning his or her first. The amount of information is often overwhelming; the pace at which it is presented can be enough to quickly drown one's self-confidence.

200 feet, lights in sight

Article | Nov 01, 2011

"Approach lights in sight, continue" is a callout heard during every two-pilot jet simulator session, yet generally unfamiliar to pilots transitioning from piston aircraft. Why? The reliability and capability of jet aircraft are so great that they are often flown into weather conditions a pilot wouldn't take a piston aircraft. Very low visibility conditions are one such example.

Jet or turboprop?

Article | Nov 01, 2011

Entry-level jets were so tempting to Jeffrey Brausch, a member of the Air Safety Institute Board of Visitors, that he looked at nearly every offering on the market. When decision time came in 1999, the model he wanted most was the one he already owned, a pristine 1981 Piper Cheyenne II XL.

Twin turboprop for the masses

Article | Nov 01, 2011

Given that it's been decades since we did a pilot report on the Piper Cheyenne, you might be surprised to learn that I am such a fan of the model, especially the II XL. From a value standpoint, it's hard to beat a Cheyenne - fast, comfortable, and capable.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2011

‘Gucci Girls’ fly Air Force tanker It took lots of arranging, since there is only one female Boeing KC–10 flight engineer in the U.S. Air Force, but for one mission an all-female crew operated an aerial refueling tanker above the Middle East.

Swapping avgas for Jet-A

Article | Sep 01, 2011

Strapping a fire-breathing turboprop engine on your average piston single confirms that one man’s toy is another man’s tool. To some, such a swap seems like a questionable use of resources.

Mark II Cessna 206: The ultimate family truckster

Article | Sep 01, 2011

What was the first turbine single certified in America? Most of us would say the Cessna Caravan, which debuted in 1985. But no. Under a supplemental type certificate (STC) Soloy Aviation Solutions of Olympia, Washington, began modifying Cessna 206s with reverse-flow 417-shaft-horsepower Rolls-Royce/Allison 250-C2 turboshaft engines in 1983. Soloy called this modification the "Mark I" model, and it came fitted with a Soloy-designed and -manufactured propeller-reduction gearbox. In all, 85 Mark I Cessna 206 conversions were built over the years. Soloy’s Mark I kit applies to Cessna 206G and -H models built from 1977 to the present.

Rally GA: Open for business

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2011

Give an airport back to the community, and pilots will come. That’s what happened on a crystal-clear Saturday morning in June when Maine’s former Naval Air Station Brunswick opened for business as Brunswick Executive Airport.

Turbine Pilot: Mods to an end

Article | Aug 01, 2011

A host of modifications transform the once dowdy Beechcraft King Air 200 into a twenty-first century keeper nearly 50 years after the first King Air took flight. Faster, further, sexier.

Power up, temps down: King Air 250

Article | Aug 01, 2011

In late June, Hawker Beechcraft Corporation (HBC) certified its new King Air 250, a more refined variant of its predecessor, the King Air B200GT. Like all King Airs, the 250 has the classy, comfortable cabin that has made the line the go-to twin turboprop for more than 7,000 customers.

Brits invade Florida

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2011

Piper’s first jet project, the Altaire, leverages the 84-year-old company’s knowledge in building airplanes and blends it with input from a group of project executives who have roots in another legendary aircraft manufacturer, Britain’s Hawker Siddeley. Hawker Siddeley was an amalgamation of British manufacturers.

Turbine pilot 2011 directory

Article | Jun 01, 2011

With 2011 came a few rays of much-needed hope in the new light-jet and turboprop market segments. Inventories of used airplanes were on the decrease—traditionally a sign that prospective buyers will begin to consider buying new aircraft.

Mitsubishi MU–2: Addictive performance

Article | May 01, 2011

Mitsubishi’s entrant to the American general aviation scene in the late 1960s—the MU–2 twin turboprop—was a cutting-edge airplane that, performance-wise, blew the doors off the competition. At the time, the Beech King Air 90 couldn’t come close to the speedy Japanese newcomer.

System Synopsis: The new redline

Article | May 01, 2011

While an MU–2 can certainly cruise faster than 300 KTAS, its ASI redline (right) is set at 250 KIAS. This prevents overspeeds at low altitudes.

Turbine Pilot: Go down and slow down? Good luck

Article | May 01, 2011

Slippery. Perhaps more than any other one skill, the transition from piston airplanes to turbines requires the pilot to learn the art of descent planning and, really, energy management.

Turbine Pilot: Making the turbine transition

Article | Apr 01, 2011

Last year at the NBAA convention in Atlanta and AOPA Aviation Summit in Long Beach, I moderated panels on moving up to turbine airplanes. The seminar was part of the Light Business Aircraft series of forums co-hosted by the two associations at their respective conventions.

Logbook entry

Article | Mar 01, 2011

Compiling business jet and turboprop accident statistics has been an objective of mine since the early 1960s. When I was a Navy carrier pilot and safety officer—and later a Pan Am pilot—I met an insurance executive who was concerned about insuring the new business jets and turboprops being bought by corporations.

AOPA Media

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2011

Experience AOPA Pilot on your computer or mobile device So radio was going to replace print, television was going to replace radio, the Internet was going to replace, well, everything. None of the predictions have come true but no matter the medium people want good content—you’ll read/watch/listen to anything, any way as long as you deem it “good.” Our goal at AOPA Media is to provide you with the most interesting, informative, entertaining, good content—on our magazine pages, on our website, through our e-mail newsletters, and on our video channel, AOPA Live.