Turboprop

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AOPA Media

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2011

Experience AOPA Pilot on your computer or mobile device So radio was going to replace print, television was going to replace radio, the Internet was going to replace, well, everything. None of the predictions have come true but no matter the medium people want good content—you’ll read/watch/listen to anything, any way as long as you deem it “good.” Our goal at AOPA Media is to provide you with the most interesting, informative, entertaining, good content—on our magazine pages, on our website, through our e-mail newsletters, and on our video channel, AOPA Live.

Compelling Kestrel

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2011

Alan Klapmeier's back with a new company - and a new plane - the single-engine turboprop Kestrel, a sleek, six-seat, 340-knot composite aircraft.

Pilot Briefing

Article | Dec 01, 2010

Virgin Galactic ‘Enterprise’ completes glide test The suborbital commercial tourist spaceship VSS (Virgin Spaceship) Enterprise—also known as SpaceShipTwo—owned by Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic company completed its first unpowered glide test October 10. You can see a video of the flight on the Virgin Galactic website.

What to expect when you step up

Article | Dec 01, 2010

Turboprop airplanes are simpler in some ways than pistons, although the environment in which turboprops operate opens up a whole new world of requirements and knowledge. And then there’s the complexity of the machines themselves in terms of systems.

Letters

Article | Nov 01, 2010

It was impossible not to finish the article “Pride of WWII” written by Barry Schiff (September 2010 AOPA Pilot). This was by far the best article I have ever read in AOPA Pilot.

Waypoints: Why your next engine may be a turboprop

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2010

Dateline: 1990—Citing the product liability crisis in aviation and related dearth of piston-aircraft manufacturing, aircraft manufacturers consol- idate product lines and focus on the more lucrative business jet market. Turboprops, despite the recent success of the Cessna Caravan, are projected to be the next market segment eviscerated.

Seizing the day

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2010

The dismal data confirm a grim, well-known reality: 2009 was a disastrous year for aircraft manufacturers—and owners felt the pain as the value of used aircraft plummeted, too. Less visible, however, was the fact that some bargain shoppers recognized the down market as a chance to snap up deals on highly discounted aircraft.

Turbine Pilot: Flying in the wild, wild west

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2010

Lessing Stern’s initial introduction to flying came as a child when he traveled on airplanes his parents owned for business. The corporate aircraft included a Gulfstream G1 turboprop and later Sabreliner and Citation jets that moved them about the country from their home in Colorado.

Avionics

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2009

Garmin International continues its march toward penetrating more of the turbine market. The company’s popular three-screen G1000 avionics suite is already standard equipment on Cessna’s Mustang light jet and Caravan single-engine turboprop, Daher-Socata’s TBM 850, and Piper’s Meridian.

Turbine Pilot Special Section: Before You Buy, Prebuy

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2009

A prepurchase inspection is always a challenge, whether the airplane is a J–3 Cub or a Boeing 727. But a turboprop, with its combination of jet engine(s) mated to propeller(s), plus its many systems, makes for one of the most difficult.

Turbine Pilot Special Section: The Next Airplane

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2009

John Hayes’ two-decade march through airplanes of ever-increasing capability and complexity seems, in hindsight, as if it were carefully planned from the start. ‘AOPA Pilot’, Turbine Edition, OCTOBER 2009 Table of Contents D-JET Dawn Moving to turbine power Up and coming The next airplane Brazilian breakaway Before you buy, prebuy It wasn’t.

Turbine Pilot Special Section: Up and coming

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2009

In spite of the doom and gloom tumbling off the newspapers, television, and the Internet, the fact is that new general aviation airplanes are in the works. Sure, some have fallen by the wayside.

Turbine Pilot: New magic

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2009

The Garmin G1000 cockpit upgrade to the Piper Meridian represents the third-generation cockpit for the 10-year-old design, but the first that can be called truly integrated. Piper entered the single-engine turboprop fray starting in 1998 with the announcement of the Meridian; deliveries began in late 2000.

Turbine Pilot Cessna Caravan: Sky Truck

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2009

With some 1,800 airplanes delivered since its debut in 1985, Cessna’s Caravan ranks as an icon among utilitarian singles. It’s a massive Pratt & Whitney-powered 675-shp turboprop that stands tall on the ramp, has a maximum payload of some 3,000 pounds, a huge unpressurized cabin, and yet behaves surprisingly like a Cessna Skyhawk.

Turbine Pilot: Old Idea, New Terms

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2009

The transition from piston aircraft pilot to commander of a turboprop or even a pure jet often demands a variety of new skills based on concepts first learned during private pilot training. Consider the efforts to sort out the differences between a glass cockpit and one with steam gauges.

Turbine Pilot: Pilatus' Apex

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2008

With sales nearing the 800 mark, the Pilatus PC-12 has been a standout in the single-engine turboprop market. Because the external features of the airplane remained largely unchanged during its 14-year production run, it can be tempting to believe that today’s PC-12 is the same as those of yore.

Turbine Edition: Flight Plan

Article | Oct 01, 2008

Oh, what a difference a year makes. Our 2007 AOPA Pilot: Turbine Edition, released a year ago, treated very light jets and the subject of owner-flown turbine operations as a novelty.

Turbine Edition: Forecast

Article | Oct 01, 2008

Up signs in a down economy Small turbine aircraft catering to owner-operators and other customers continue to sell remarkably well. The established players and products in this market are prospering.

Turbine Edition: Jet Stream

Article | Oct 01, 2008

Pratt stacks. Know this shape? Sure you do.

Turbine Edition: Market Watch

Article | Oct 01, 2008

Shakeout may be a mild characterization of the once populous field known as Very Light Jets. Adam Aircraft, manufacturer of the certified A-500 tandem piston twin and the prototype A-700 twin jet, declared Chapter 7 bankruptcy and its assets were sold to Russian investors for an undisclosed price rumored to be just north of $10 million.

Turbine Edition: New vs. Used

Article | Oct 01, 2008

Conventional wisdom: There’s a direct correlation between U.S. corporate profits and business jet sales.

Turbine Edition: Fly Your Own

Article | Oct 01, 2008

The first turbine airplane that actor Harrison Ford purchased to fly personally was a Cessna Caravan in 2000. He used it as he has all of his subsequent turbine machines, for business, pleasure, and to commute between his homes in Los Angeles and Jackson, Wyoming.

Turbine Edition: Pilot in Command

Article | Oct 01, 2008

There is one word, one common element that pilots will encounter when transitioning from a piston airplane to any one of today’s modern turbine aircraft, whether turboprop or jet—speed. It seems so obvious, and the reason many of us have converted to turbine aircraft for our business and pleasure flying, speed gets us to our destinations sooner.

Turbine Edition: Power Play

Article | Oct 01, 2008

A quick survey of the new turbine aircraft market reveals a stable of highly capable performers, but be ready for sticker shock. Even the least expensive, entry-level single-engine turboprop can rapidly surpass $2 million as options accumulate, and that’s just the price of admission.

Turbine Edition: Single-Pilot Safety

Article | Oct 01, 2008

There are a number of reasons why turbine flying is safer than operations involving piston-powered airplanes. For one, turbine pilots usually attend thorough, structured, simulator-based training designed around the type of airplane they’ll be flying; after all, insurance companies require it in order for pilots to be covered.