Warbird

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Dogfight: Experimental versus Standard

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2011

Editor at Large Tom Horne and Senior Editor Dave Hirschman have a lot of things in common: lots of ratings, lots of experience in lots of airplane models - and lots of opinions (and similar haircuts). We last turned them loose on the topic of running the tank dry on occasion and the response to two different schools of thought garnered some of our most interesting musings from a large number of readers. So with a "Dogfight" this month regarding lean vs. rich of peak, we hope you'll enjoy these two takes on a topic - and let us know what you think, too.

Cessna L–19 Bird Dog: A soldier’s best friend

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2011

Cessna's Model 305 became better known as the L-19 Bird Dog - an apt name because of how well it enabled pilots and their rear-seat observers to search for and locate enemy ground positions. Once found, such targets were identified and their locations radioed to those who would respond with an air assault, artillery, or ground troops. When enemy ground troops spotted a Bird Dog flying low and overhead, it gave them good reason to believe that something bad might soon happen. Although the L–19's slow speed made it vulnerable to ground fire, enemy soldiers often would not shoot at one for fear of revealing their position.

Rally GA: So you want to have a fly-in?

Article | Jun 01, 2011

Imagine a sky full of Golden Age museum pieces, the thunder of splendid warbirds, the buzz of lightplanes, and a ramp lined with these monuments from aviation history. This vision danced in our heads like the sugar plums they were.

Waypoints

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2011

The B–17’s four cranky Wright engines coughed and barked to life one by one, each leaving a trail of gray exhaust until all nine of the cylinders could agree that, yes, we’re going flying today. The staccato of the big radials broke the early morning’s quiet, commanding attention from everyone in the Sun ’n Fun Fly-In’s warbird area.

Flying Yellowstone and ‘The Grand’

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2011

Fog and rain left behind by storms that delayed my airline flight the previous evening fill the mountain-ringed bowl of Jackson Hole, Wyoming.

Never Again:

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2011

I fondly remember many memorable flights with my dad when I was a little boy. No matter what the circumstance, he always seemed to be as cool as a cucumber.

Letters

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2011

The disagreeing articles on pattern entries (“Dogfight: Pattern Entry,” January 2011 AOPA Pilot) prompted me to comment. I agree with Dave Hirschman in principle (less time in the air and less radio chatter is good), but I have to disagree that “The Bonanza pilot’s pattern entry procedure is time-honored, FAA approved.” I have yet to see any approval for anything other than the 45-degree entry to the downwind.

Pride of WWII

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2010

Distraught by the attack on Pearl Harbor and a series of defeats in the Pacific, America desperately needed a victory during the early months of World War II to bolster morale at home and give a shot in the arm to U.S. armed forces struggling to contain Japan’s drive across the Pacific.

Fly-Outs: July

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2010

It's July and summer is in full swing. What a great time to celebrate your freedom to fly.

Technique: Running on empty

Article | Mar 01, 2010

We’ve all heard the maxim—“The only time there’s too much fuel in an airplane is when it’s on fire.” That’s not entirely true, of course, but carrying an insufficient amount of fuel, or not being able to get it to the engine(s), has been a frustratingly persistent cause of aircraft accidents for generations. About 200 GA accidents in the past five years were attributed to pilots running out of fuel, according to the AOPA Air Safety Foundation.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2010

There’s not a lot of demand for a Ford Tri-Motor 5-AT type rating, given that only three of the 13,700-pound aircraft still fly, but nine pilots have completed the course since it was first offered at Arizona’s Grand Canyon Valle Airport in 2008. Ford Tri-Motor N414H is owned by John Siebold, owner of the airport, who once owned Scenic Airlines and Grand Canyon Airlines.

Frugal Flyer: Finding a tailwind

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2010

In the world of compromises known as aviation, it’s rare for all indications to point in one direction. But while planning a recent flight from the Madison, Wisconsin, area home to Frederick, Maryland, in AOPA’s 2009 Sweepstakes Cirrus SR22, all signs pointed the same way to an economical trip: Higher! Sure, aircraft engines consume less fuel (and make less power) as they breathe thinner air at high altitudes.

Enjoy the View

Article | May 01, 2009

The first time I saw Post Mills Airport (2B9) in Vermont was in 1984, back when I was in high school and dreamed of the pilot certificate I would have some day. Seeing airplanes tied down beside a runway made of grass changed my understanding of what an airport could be.

Childhood Dreams

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2008

“I’ve been infatuated with airplanes since I was really, really little.” Super Corsair owner Robert Odegaard says. One of his earliest memories is when he was about two or three years old, running from his mother’s arms to the living room window for a better view of a noisy yellow Stearman, spraying the family’s fields near Fargo, North Dakota.

Proficient Pilot: Home is where the heart is

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2008

Barry Schiff has logged more than 27,000 flight hours in 300 types of aircraft. I was a 13-year-old kid when I first stepped onto Clover Field, now known as Santa Monica Airport (SMO).

Vibrant Community

Article | Aug 01, 2007

A picture-perfect morning greets the Clermont County Airport in Batavia, Ohio. All you can hear is the static sound of the interstate a few miles away and birds chirping incessantly.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2006

The dawn of human-powered flight You might think you need Lance Armstrong's quads to attempt human-powered flight, but a group in Canada says you really don't need to be a seven-time Tour de France winner to leave the ground. The project is the brainchild of a retired research scientist with an appropriate last name, Richard Synergy, of Toronto, Canada.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2006

A T-REX is born Scientists are unleashing a multi-pronged effort to understand the structure and evolution of some of nature's most powerful and mysterious forces: mountain waves. This represents a high-tech follow-on to earlier projects where gutsy glider pilots risked their skins by exploring the waves firsthand (see "In the Lee of Giants," December 2001 Pilot).

Saving Aircraft Inc.

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2006

To find Chino Airport, drive an hour east of Los Angeles, turn south at Ontario, California, and when you reach the 1,000th Holstein milk cow on the right, you're there. A short distance from that cow is The Air Museum: Planes of Fame; some 25,000 people find it every year to attend shows on aviation history, see historic aircraft fly, and see aircraft from all eras in restoration.

Up and Out

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2005

Last year, Pilot published an article on VFR arrivals (see "Approaching the Airport," May 2004 Pilot), describing how best to approach an airport in visual conditions, and in response received the following e-mail from flight instructor Mark Hutchins in Virginia: "As a person who flies in and out of the traffic pattern a lot, I appreciate your article on pattern entry. I hope you will do an article on VFR departures from a nontowered field.

Pilotage

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2005

Mark R. Twombly has been reporting on general aviation for more than 20 years.

Hangar Talk

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2005

When longtime pilot and author Richard Axelrod went to a warbird owners awards dinner, he was struck by the diversity of the people present. He decided to find out what, if anything, they had in common.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2005

Made in America It's hard to buy anything totally American made these days. The auto business has become confusing to the point where it takes research to find out where your bumpers originated.

Flying With Passion

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2005

The military aircraft are flying close together, nose to tail. "Red Lead, Red Two has a bogey at 2 o'clock." The airplane in front rocks its wings, and all the aircraft smoothly maneuver into a fingertip formation.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2005

Laser pilot-warning system goes into effect If you're flying in the Washington, D.C., area and you see a strange light on the ground that quickly flashes red-red-green, it means you're special. You've been selected as the latest pilot to violate restricted airspace.