Warbird

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Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2006

The dawn of human-powered flight You might think you need Lance Armstrong's quads to attempt human-powered flight, but a group in Canada says you really don't need to be a seven-time Tour de France winner to leave the ground. The project is the brainchild of a retired research scientist with an appropriate last name, Richard Synergy, of Toronto, Canada.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2006

A T-REX is born Scientists are unleashing a multi-pronged effort to understand the structure and evolution of some of nature's most powerful and mysterious forces: mountain waves. This represents a high-tech follow-on to earlier projects where gutsy glider pilots risked their skins by exploring the waves firsthand (see "In the Lee of Giants," December 2001 Pilot).

Saving Aircraft Inc.

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2006

To find Chino Airport, drive an hour east of Los Angeles, turn south at Ontario, California, and when you reach the 1,000th Holstein milk cow on the right, you're there. A short distance from that cow is The Air Museum: Planes of Fame; some 25,000 people find it every year to attend shows on aviation history, see historic aircraft fly, and see aircraft from all eras in restoration.

Up and Out

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2005

Last year, Pilot published an article on VFR arrivals (see "Approaching the Airport," May 2004 Pilot), describing how best to approach an airport in visual conditions, and in response received the following e-mail from flight instructor Mark Hutchins in Virginia: "As a person who flies in and out of the traffic pattern a lot, I appreciate your article on pattern entry. I hope you will do an article on VFR departures from a nontowered field.

Pilotage

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2005

Mark R. Twombly has been reporting on general aviation for more than 20 years.

Hangar Talk

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2005

When longtime pilot and author Richard Axelrod went to a warbird owners awards dinner, he was struck by the diversity of the people present. He decided to find out what, if anything, they had in common.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2005

Made in America It's hard to buy anything totally American made these days. The auto business has become confusing to the point where it takes research to find out where your bumpers originated.

Flying With Passion

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2005

The military aircraft are flying close together, nose to tail. "Red Lead, Red Two has a bogey at 2 o'clock." The airplane in front rocks its wings, and all the aircraft smoothly maneuver into a fingertip formation.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2005

Laser pilot-warning system goes into effect If you're flying in the Washington, D.C., area and you see a strange light on the ground that quickly flashes red-red-green, it means you're special. You've been selected as the latest pilot to violate restricted airspace.

Welcome to Moontown

Article | May 01, 2005

The red Alabama clay is packed hard into a surface solid enough for lawn bowling — at just shy of 2,200 feet long this grass strip makes an excellent partner whether you're flying an old Piper Cub or an old Mooney. Whether you're as light as a Quicksilver or Blanik, or as heavy as a "Big Annie" Antonov AN-2, slip down below the ridgeline to the west, get down to just a few feet over the hayfield on short final, flare just past the runway end lights — this is a 24-hour operation — and roll onto the smooth grass.