Congress congratulates AOPA on turning 70

June 10, 2009

sevenzeroThe U.S. House of Representatives on June 9 passed a resolution congratulating AOPA on reaching its seventieth anniversary, and commending the association for seven decades of work on behalf of America’s general aviation pilots and aircraft owners.

The resolution notes AOPA’s longtime commitment to safety through the creation of the AOPA Air Safety Foundation, its important role in passage of the General Aviation Restoration Act of 1994, which reestablished the U.S. general aviation industry as a world leader, and its early support for civilian use of GPS, which will be the backbone of the Next Generation Air Traffic Control System.

“We are honored to be recognized by the U.S. House of Representatives,” said AOPA President and CEO Craig L. Fuller. “Over the past seven decades, we might not always have agreed with Congress, but we have always found members willing to hear us out when speaking on behalf of our members.”

The sponsor of the resolution, Rep. Charles Dent (R-Pa.), is the Ranking Member of the Transportation Security and Infrastructure Protection subcommittee of the House Committee on Homeland Security, and sits on the Aviation subcommittee of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee. These are two of the committees and subcommittees that matter most when it comes to general aviation issues.

“Throughout its rich history, AOPA has developed and maintained close working relationships with federal government agencies, including the Department of Transportation, the Department of Homeland Security, the Federal Aviation Administration, and the Transportation Security Administration,” said Dent in presenting the resolution on the House floor. “By working closely with these agencies, AOPA has helped our nation create the safest and most efficient aviation system in the world.

“Over the last 70 years,” he continued, “AOPA has also fostered a dynamic relationship with Congress and, specifically, the members of the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, on which I serve, and remains a key actor in the development of our nation’s aviation policy, having played a vital role in the crafting and passage of this year’s FAA Reauthorization Act.”

 “If AOPA has been successful over the past 70 years, it is because of our members,” concluded Fuller. “But also because of the strong working relationship we have forged with Congress over the years. We will need both as we look forward to the next 70 years of advocating on behalf of general aviation.”