Pilots from around the world meet for IAOPA World Assembly to support general aviation and aerial work

November 11, 2009

Pilots from around the world meet for IAOPA World Assembly to support general aviation and aerial work

The International Council of Aircraft Owner and Pilot Associations (IAOPA) held its 23rd biennial World Assembly in Toronto, Canada, 19-24 June 2006. The board met to discuss the status of worldwide general aviation (GA) and to determine ways to foster and promote the needs of its constituents. Representatives from 24 affiliates, each representing a national Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA), gathered to discuss international GA, seeking a world view for their diverse operations.

IAOPA President Phil Boyer told the delegates that they should be proud of their achievement. "This world assembly is one of the best we have had in terms of the presentations, discussions, and resolutions," he said. "We have provided a way forward for general aviation in a time of significant challenges."

Delegates discussed a variety of issues of critical interest to their members, including aviation security measures, preserving aerodromes, user fees, the public perception of GA, aviation fuel availability, and emerging communications, navigation, and surveillance equipment requirements.

A number of resolutions emerged from these discussions that will provide direction for the association and its affiliates for the future. Among them are:

  • A call for government recognition of the value of GA aerodromes and the need to develop land use policies designed to preserve and protect them.
  • The need for countries to conduct threat analyses and cost impact studies prior to initiating security measures affecting GA.
  • Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) pose a potential hazard to conventional aircraft and should be closely regulated to prevent interference with the free movement of other aircraft.
  • Strong support for the enhanced production of aviation fuels containing environmentally friendly materials of biological origin.
  • A call for government recognition that GA users already pay for their environmental impact through the burden of taxes and/or fees.
  • To encourage states to streamline government administrative and security processes that will facilitate the validation of foreign pilot licenses.

Full text of the resolutions and copies of the presentations may be found on the council's Web site at www.iaopa.org.

IAOPA represents the interests of AOPA affiliates in 64 countries of the world, comprising more than 470,000 GA and aerial work pilots and aircraft operators. The council was formed in 1962 to provide a voice for GA in world aviation forums. GA encompasses four-fifths of all civil aircraft and two-thirds of all pilots worldwide.

06-2-027

June 27, 2006