Shop Talk: Standard Parts

November 19, 2009

Wish you had a better understanding of the regulations when talking to your mechanic or the avionics shop? Aircraft Electronics Association Vice President of Government/Industry Affairs Ric Peri answers your frequently asked questions.


Question: What is a standard part?

Answer: FAA Advisory Circular (AC) 21-29C defines a standard part as “[a] part manufactured in complete compliance with an established industry or U.S. government specification which includes design, manufacturing, test and acceptance criteria, and uniform identification requirements; or for a type of part which the Administrator has found demonstrates conformity based solely on meeting performance criteria, is in complete compliance with an established industry or U.S. Government specification which contains performance criteria, test and acceptance criteria, and uniform identification requirements. The specification must include all information necessary to produce and conform the part, and be published so that any party may manufacture the part. Examples include, but are not limited to, National Aerospace Standards (NAS), Army-Navy Aeronautical Standard (AN), Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), SAE Sematec, Joint Electron Device Engineering Council, Joint Electron Tube Engineering Council, and American National Standards Institute (ANSI).”

The FAA also notes:

1. Criteria for acceptable established industry or U.S. Government specifications differs for parts which must meet specifications which include design, manufacturing, test and acceptance criteria, and uniform identification requirements; and for parts (which the Administrator finds demonstrates conformity based solely on meeting performance criteria) which must meet established industry or U.S. Government specifications which contain test and acceptance criteria, and uniform identification requirements. The organizations listed may publish one or both types of specifications.

2. The FAA will publicize determinations of parts which (the Administrator finds) demonstrate conformity based solely on meeting performance criteria. A determination has been made for discreet (sic) electrical and electronic components, as published in the Federal Register on January 31, 1997.

Submit your own question via e-mail.

Note: AEA offers this column in order to foster greater understanding of the Federal Aviation Regulations and the rules that govern the industry. AEA strives to make them as accurate as possible at the time they are written, but rules change so you should verify the information. AEA disclaims any warranty for the accuracy of the information provided. This information is not meant to serve as legal advice.