Flight Design unveils glider tug, hand controls

April 9, 2010

Flight Design announced April 9 that a new variant of its CT line of light sport aircraft will be a glider tug. Named the CTLS HL (for high lift), the airplane is now in flight test and will have a turbocharged Rotax 914 engine, feature a wing span 12 percent longer than that of the standard model CT versions, have a larger horizontal stabilizer, and will be offered in the United States as well as Europe. Floats also can be fitted to the CTLS HL.

Turbocharging will make the CTLS HL especially appealing to those operating out of high-altitude airports, Flight Design says. The price is set at 92,612 Euros, or about $125,026.

A Flight Design subsidiary, Flight Design Technik, announced that it is moving forward with production of hand controls for use in CT airplanes. Designed for those unable to use their legs, the hand controls incorporate rudder, nosewheel steering, aileron, elevator, and power controls on a two-piece control yoke. The 2,500-Euro/$3,375 controls weigh five pounds and take an hour for initial installation. Subsequent installations or removals will take less than 20 minutes, Flight Design Technik said.

Two other CT mods—a belly-mounted cargo pod capable of carrying up to 110 pounds, and a 35-gallon auxiliary fuel tank—were also announced at AERO. The cargo pod measures four feet, seven inches long; 13 inches deep; and two feet, eight inches wide. The auxiliary fuel tank fits into the co-pilot’s seating space, effectively making a weight exchange that replaces the mass that would have been taken up by a second pilot. Under this scheme, the airplane will have extended range without exceeding LSA gross weight limits. Price and availability information on these mods are not yet available.

Thomas A. Horne

Thomas A. Horne | AOPA Pilot Editor at Large, AOPA

AOPA Pilot Editor at Large Tom Horne has worked at AOPA since the early 1980s. He began flying in 1975 and has an airline transport pilot and flight instructor certificates. He’s flown everything from ultralights to Gulfstreams and ferried numerous piston airplanes across the Atlantic.