Stand and be counted for GA

June 9, 2010

The FAA’s annual General Aviation and Part 135 Activity Survey helps the agency determine funding for infrastructure and service needs, assess the impact of regulatory changes, and measure aviation safety. If you received a postcard invitation or survey by mail, AOPA encourages you to complete it online.

The GA Survey is the FAA’s only source of information on the size and makeup of the GA and Part 135 fleets, the number of hours flown, and the reasons people fly. The agency is surveying more than 85,000 aircraft, which is almost 30 percent of U.S.-registered GA/non-scheduled Part 135 aircraft. This includes all aircraft manufactured within the past five years, as well as all turbine aircraft, rotorcraft, special light sport aircraft, aircraft certificated to fly on-demand Part 135 operations, and Alaska-based aircraft.

Survey forms were mailed at the beginning of June. Pilots who received the invitation may use their N number to log in and complete it online or mail it back. Even if you did not fly your aircraft during 2009, you sold it, or the plane was damaged, the FAA wants to hear from you. The information the FAA gathers will help it allocate funds and prepare accurate estimates of aviation safety.

Responses are confidential, and the information provided will be used only for statistical purposes. Information will not be published or released in any form that would reveal specific information reported by an individually identifiable respondent. For owners of multiple aircraft, an abbreviated survey form is available. Owners of three or more aircraft, as well as anyone with questions about the form, can contact PA Consulting Group at 800/826-1797 or by e-mail.