Dynon offers 'Pocket Panel' for GA pilots

July 23, 2012

dynonUntil now Dynon marketing director Robert Hamilton classified pilots in two categories: pilots who thought his avionics were too inexpensive, and those who thought they were too expensive. The ones who thought they weren’t expensive enough were pilots of Part 23 certificated airplanes. Now, he has a battery powered attitude indicator with internal GPS called the Dynon D1 Pocket Panel that can be used by both categories of pilots.

The D1 uses the same attitude, heading, and reference system (AHRS) technology found in Dynon glass cockpits. It is priced at $1,425.

The D1 is a true artificial horizon with accurate pitch and roll, and can find the horizon even if turned on in flight. It maintains the horizon during extended turns. The AHRS sensors also drive a turn-rate indicator and slip-skid ball. The internal GPS receiver displays ground speed, altitude, vertical speed, and ground track.

The unit’s battery will last at least four hours on a charge, and comes with two portable mounting options. “The number one question we receive at air shows is ‘Can I put Dynon avionics in my airplane?’ If they flew a type certificated plane our answer was always no. But now for the first time we can say yes,” Hamilton said.

Another new Dynon product for Experimental and light sport aircraft is an ADS-B traffic and weather receiver called the SV-ADSB-470 UAT Band Traffic and Weather Receiver, and it is designed for the SkyView system. The remotely mounted receiver module integrates with the SkyView glass cockpit system to place weather and traffic information on top of detailed navigation information. It costs $995.

All information displayed is free with no monthly subscriptions, based on the FAA’s ADS-B broadcast in the United States. Weather is displayed graphically and textually on SkyView, and includes NEXRAD radar, METARs, and TAFs. Airport weather data can be chosen based on nearest or by airport identifier.

It works with Dynon’s existing SV-XPNDR-261 Mode-S transponder module with ADS-B out, to display traffic information, even without a certified GPS on board.

Al Marsh

Alton K. Marsh | AOPA Pilot Senior Editor, AOPA

AOPA Pilot Senior Editor Alton Marsh has been a pilot since 1970 and has an airline transport pilot certificate and instrument and multiengine flight instructor certificates, aerobatic training, and a commercial seaplane certificate.