Going electronic with logbooks

August 30, 2013

Many pilots still rely on their trusty paper logbooks to track their flights and milestones. But developers have created logbook apps that offer more functions than mere paper. We look at five of them here. These are not endorsements of any app.

LogTen Pro Universal Pilot Logbook ($79.99 in iTunes): This app, which syncs across Mac, iPhone, and iPad via iCloud, allows users to choose configurations for a student pilot, a certificated flight instructor, or a commercial pilot based on the most common fields for the flying being done. Flight instructors can add digital signatures.

FlightBOX (free in iTunes, but $5.99 for logbook function): This multi-function iPhone/iPad app includes a customizable logbook. Entries include date, aircraft, pilot in command, graphical route charting, duration, dual, and instrument time. Users can also add extra fields and email or print data.

Logbook Pro Mobile (free in iTunes, but additional functions range from $7.99 to $39.99 and Google Play): This iPhone/iPad app allows users to log items including certificates, ratings, flight reviews, historical data, and flights, and view detailed and extensive reports.

Pilot Pro ($39.99 in iTunes): Users of this iPhone/iPad app, which syncs via the cloud, can view an extensive summary of flight time and analyze time with an interactive graph. Users can log data, including departure/destination; flight duration; day and night landings; aircraft make, model and registration; and approaches.

Safelog Pilot Logbook ($39.99 in iTunes): This iPhone/iPad app connects with PC or Web-based accounts and can be configured to look like paper logbooks, even allowing users to add custom fields. Features include automated night-time calculation; built-in aircraft types; digital signature; a database of more than 70,000 airports and landing places; and the ability to store photos, journals, comments, and notes from flights.

Please email your app suggestions to me. I’m looking for FBOs/services, instrument simulators, checklists, and radar apps, along with updates from apps developers. I’m also looking for more Google Play apps. I thank all of you who have been sending them in.  Please keep then coming, by emailing me. Go here to see my past apps columns.