Sim developers team up on G1000 AATD

Elite, Flight1 product will cost schools less

July 28, 2013

Elite FAA-approved G1000 AATD

A partnership between two companies in the flight simulation arena has resulted in a new Garmin G1000-based glass cockpit training device. The Elite PI-1000, developed by Elite Simulation Solutions and Flight1 Aviation Technologies, already has been certified by the FAA as an Advanced Aviation Training Device (AATD). The companies plan to formally announce the new product July 29 at EAA AirVenture in Oshkosh, Wis.

“For more than 10 years, Elite has used actual Garmin G1000 avionics in our high-end training devices,” said John Dixon, Elite Simulation Solutions president and CEO. “Thanks to our partnership with Flight1 Aviation Technologies, we’re now able to provide flight schools with a G1000 training device that provides even more benefits—at a much lower price. And it’s certified by the FAA as an AATD.”

The companies said the approach has resulted in an advanced aviation training device that will be as attractive to pilots and instructors as it is to flight schools.

The PI-1000 features an Elite Pro Panel II Flight Console, Elite rudder pedals, G1000W emulation hardware (PFD, MFD, and GFC-700 AFCS), an integrated standby instrument system, a 32-inch LED external visual display, and two computer systems. The Elite hardware works together with Lockheed Martin’s Prepar3D visual simulation platform and Flight1 Tech’s G1000 simulation and instructor station software.

Flight1 Tech’s G1000 Student Simulator Pro software includes realistic PFD and MFD graphics, obstacle and terrain warnings, airways, vertical navigation (VNAV), departure and arrival procedures, glide path mode for LPV WAAS approaches, missed approach procedures including course to altitude legs, an updatable worldwide Navigraph navigation database, and aircraft-specific V-speed and accurate engine indication system displays for eight different aircraft. Currently modeled aircraft are the Cessna 172R, 172S, 182T, T182T, 206, and T206, as well as the Diamond DA40 and DA42.

The G1000 student software integrates with Flight1 Tech’s Virtual Instructor Station Pro (VISPRO) software, which features a unique moving map and instructor console that provides professional-quality tools for monitoring, instruction, and analysis. Using VISPRO, instructors can easily control the simulation’s environment, change the weather, reposition the student’s aircraft, and introduce spontaneous G1000 component and LRU failures into their student’s training, including the automatic switch to reversionary mode after a display failure.

“For years, forward-thinking flight schools have been using our G1000 Student Simulator software and VISPRO to create safer pilots and new profit centers for their businesses,” said Jim Rhoads, Flight1 Aviation Technologies vice president. “By partnering with Elite, we’ve finally gotten the FAA seal of approval. That will open up the door for even more flight schools to benefit from these powerful training tools.”

The FAA’s AATD approval allows the PI-1000 to be used for up to 2.5 hours of training logged toward the private pilot certificate, 20 hours toward an instrument rating, 50 hours toward the commercial certificate, and 25 hours toward an ATP certificate. The PI-1000 also can be used to complete certain elements of practical tests, to complete partial instrument proficiency checks, to log instrument experience for currency, and more.

“While FAA approval officially validates the PI-1000,” Dixon said, “the benefits of this device extend far beyond logging time. The Elite hardware, Prepar3D, and the Flight1 Tech G1000 and instructor station software work together to give pilots and instructors a training experience they just can’t get with any other G1000 simulation. You really need to see it all in action to fully grasp the potential.”

Pricing was not announced. The PI-1000 will be displayed in Elite booth No. 4026 at EAA AirVenture 2013.

Mike Collins

Mike Collins | Technical Editor, AOPA

Mike Collins has worked for AOPA’s media network since 1994. He holds a private pilot certificate with an instrument rating.