New blog spotlights AOPA's advocacy

September 25, 2013

The Advocacy Insider

AOPA members know that advocacy is a vital component of the association’s mission of preserving the freedom to fly. How does the advocacy process work?  Who are the people who advocate on behalf of the association’s membership? In what venues do they make general aviation’s case? Who are the other players on the scene, and what is their stake in the issues that affect pilots?

A new blog by AOPA’s Government Affairs Division gives you a close-up view of the advocacy process as seen by the professionals who make aviation’s case day in and day out.

The Advocacy Insider introduces AOPA’s advocacy staff to the association’s members, presenting background and context on the issues they are working. The blog also provides a way for members to directly join the conversation by posting comments and participating in surveys.

Advocacy is all about communicating. To communicate effectively, AOPA’s advocacy team members spend many painstaking hours mastering the issues, analyzing the impact on general aviation, and determining the most effective course of action. Their expertise and skill are among the many reasons AOPA is known as an organization that delivers.

"No single letter or meeting is going to make or break general aviation. It is the collective, sustained effort over hundreds or thousands of interactions that will promote, preserve, and protect the freedom to fly. This is why AOPA’s experience and reputation has proven so valuable," wrote Tom Kramer, AOPA manager of airspace and modernization, profiling AOPA’s Government Affairs Division in The Advocacy Insider’s initial blog post on Sept. 3.

A day in the life of a professional advocate may never become the basis for a reality television program. It’s (usually) not packed with must-see TV drama. It’s just, well, critically important. Enjoy reading this blog and learning about AOPA advocacy. Welcome to the conversation! 

Dan Namowitz

Dan Namowitz | Aviation Writer

Dan Namowitz is an aviation writer and flight instructor. He has been a pilot since 1985 and an instructor since 1990.