Movies and Television

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Missing men, a mythic triangle made for television

Article | Oct 11, 2012

On April 20, 1980, a Greensboro, N.C., pharmacist called home from the Bahamas and reported he had one more stop to make before flying home in a Cessna 310. He was never heard from again.

Resources at risk

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2012

Flight, film, and education inspire conservation action

Go ballistic: Bid on ususual attitude course

Article | Sep 27, 2012

Watch the world spin in your windscreen in a ballistic roll, and become familiar with an upside-down view. Bid for the experience in the AOPA Foundation's A Night For Flight online auction.

90-day old airport hosts first fly-in in China

Advocacy | Aug 30, 2012

It's not Oshkosh, but the first ever fly-in by AOPA-China in Faku in the Shenyang province had all the passion and enthusiasm for general aviation characteristic of airshows worldwide.

Hollywood's precision pilot shares tips at Summit

Article | Jul 19, 2012

If you've seen a movie with aerial footage or an aircraft in flight, chances are Craig Hosking was involved. One of Hollywood's most experienced precision pilots, Hosking has served as a pilot or aerial coordinator in more than 100 titles.

Cheers, join the family of aviators at Summit

Article | Jun 21, 2012

Expand your network of aviation friends at AOPA Aviation Summit in Palm Springs, Calif., Oct. 11 through 13.

SpaceX capsule delivers cargo to space station

Article | May 30, 2012

Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX) made history May 25 as the first private company to dock a spacecraft with the International Space Station.

Boeing 727 crashed on purpose for science, television

Article | May 03, 2012

The pilot set the jetliner on a crash course and hit the silk, leaving a Boeing 727 packed with cameras, instruments, and crash test dummies to make a final plunge to the Sonoran Desert in the name of science and entertainment.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2012

World records in the works There is a flurry of world records poised to hit the news this year. Three pilots are planning to circle the globe, either for a record or for good causes.

Able Flight success

Article | Apr 20, 2012

Adam Kisielewski was feeling the pressure. The former U.S. Marine who had lost his left arm and a portion of his right leg in combat in Iraq was about to take a sport pilot checkride, and the usually cocky 28-year-old was rattled.

Bouncing Back

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2012

It was a beautiful day in the Columbia River Gorge. Hood River Airport is located in a picturesque valley, surrounded by mountains. A pilot was in his backyard garden enjoying the sunshine. He heard an airplane engine start to sputter, then quit, and listened to the sound of a loud impact in the neighboring vineyard.

Resuming the journey: A pilot's return to flight

Article | Mar 20, 2012

A journey that began with backcountry flights in Alaska takes twists and turns for one woman to become a pilot, only to have to put those dreams aside as life events interfere. Now, an opportunity to return to Alaska for some summer flights has once again ignited the desire to get back in the left seat.

IFR Fix: A show of hands

IFR Fix | Feb 17, 2012

IFR Fix readers weigh in on a variety of topics through informal polls. What does the emerging portrait reveal? Perhaps a syllabus for recurrency training.

Flying into the Big Game

Article | Feb 09, 2012

"Welcome to Indy. You're the first piston we've seen all weekend," the van driver said as he drove two pilots across the ramp to Million Air's welcome hangar, complete with a red carpet and enclosed canopy for Super Bowl weekend.

Letters

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2012

Mike Collins touched my heart with his article "Honoring the Tuskegee Airmen" (December 2011 AOPA Pilot). Lt. Col. William Holloman III of the famed 332nd Fighter Group was a dear friend and passed away in 2010. Bill was a national treasure. Prior to his passing, he was looking forward to climbing back into a Stearman.

Film tributes to Tuskegee Airmen debut in January

Article | Jan 04, 2012

A pair of film tributes will debut in January paying homage to aviators who risked everything for a country that refused to let them eat at the same lunch counters or ride at the front of a bus.

Honoring the Tuskegee Airmen

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2011

There was a lot going through Matt Quy's mind that steamy August morning as he flew his 1944 Boeing PT-13 Stearman down the final approach to Runway 19 Left at Washington Dulles International Airport. His wife, Tina, sat in the front cockpit. To his left, he could see the Washington Monument in the distance. The wind singing in the biplane's flying wires confirmed his airspeed: Fast. In a relative way, of course.

Reality check: New TV series seeks ‘bush pilot’

Article | Nov 30, 2011

When is someone going to search for a rugged, outdoorsy general aviation pilot to play a part in a TV reality show? Someone has. You may be just the pilot the casting crew is looking for, and you might even get to fly an airplane on TV.

'Flying Wild Alaska's' wild girl

Article | Oct 21, 2011

Fans of The Discovery Channel television series 'Flying Wild Alaska' need to set their reminders for Friday, Oct. 28 at 10 p.m. for the first show of the second season. 'Flying Wild Alaska' chronicles the life and work of the Tweto family, who operates and flies Era Alaska, Alaska's largest regional airline.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2011

‘Gucci Girls’ fly Air Force tanker It took lots of arranging, since there is only one female Boeing KC–10 flight engineer in the U.S. Air Force, but for one mission an all-female crew operated an aerial refueling tanker above the Middle East.

Fly-Outs: Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2011

Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome in New York's Hudson River Valley redefines the word "old." Or should we say "really old"? For in 2011, a World War II vintage aircraft, at more than 60 years old, is old, but a World War I aircraft? That's really old. And not only are these aircraft really old, but they are performing, active flying machines from a time when aviation was in its infancy.

Above NY

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2011

At the Downtown Manhattan Heliport (JRB) - the first heliport in the United States to offer scheduled passenger service and the only place today where one can begin commercial tours of the city in a helicopter - people are happily anticipating their 15- to 20-minute rides. There are five operators here, each offering a bird's-eye view of the city that never sleeps, the home of Hearst and Trump and Giuliani - and, of course, the worst terrorist attack in the twenty-first century.

Flying skeletons and electric hummingbirds

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2011

Extreme flying doesn't always mean speed. It can refer to a lack of speed, too. Here are two model airplanes that are polar opposites, as are their pilots. One lingers on the edge of an aerodynamic stall for more than a half hour and will star in its own documentary called "Float", while the other zooms about with electric power, hovering on its tail - or nose - teaching even the birds new tricks. Both have a greater connection to general aviation than you'd think.