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Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2005

SpaceShip One heads to National Air and Space Museum Burt Rutan's SpaceShipOne will be taking its rightful place this month, hanging between the Bell X-1 and the Spirit of St. Louis and above the Mercury space capsule in the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

Project Pilot Update

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2005

AOPA Project Pilot gives experienced pilots a way to share their love of flight by mentoring student pilots. Backed by the resources of AOPA, mentors help guarantee the best possible introduction of flying, form first flight to checkride.

Test Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2005

GENERAL What unique method did Japan and other countries use during the 1930s (before the advent of radar) to detect approaching enemy aircraft? According to the Aeronautical Information Manual, what is the most likely way for a pilot to inadvertently induce whiteout conditions? From reader Mark Barchenko: What does a modern U.S. naval destroyer have in common with a McDonnell Douglas DC-10? NASA's hypersonic X-43A, an unmanned research airplane, is powered by an air-breathing scramjet and flew at almost Mach 10 (10 times the speed of sound) on November 16, 2004.

Test Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2005

GENERAL During World War I, the Pour le Mérite was the highest military decoration that could be bestowed upon a German pilot. Why was it also called the "Blue Max" (popularized by the 1966 motion picture of the same name starring George Peppard)? In the motion picture Tora! Tora! Tora! Lt.

Welcome to Moontown

Article | May 01, 2005

The red Alabama clay is packed hard into a surface solid enough for lawn bowling — at just shy of 2,200 feet long this grass strip makes an excellent partner whether you're flying an old Piper Cub or an old Mooney. Whether you're as light as a Quicksilver or Blanik, or as heavy as a "Big Annie" Antonov AN-2, slip down below the ridgeline to the west, get down to just a few feet over the hayfield on short final, flare just past the runway end lights — this is a 24-hour operation — and roll onto the smooth grass.

Flights of Fancy

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2005

Aviation has never been an industry to stand still. For years, new designs, ideas, and innovations were tested, scrapped, modified, or put into use, all in the interest of enhancing the general safety record of airplanes.

Aviation's Forgotten Pioneer

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2005

Stop by the coffee shop at any local airport and you'll find a couple of tables filled with general aviation pilots telling hangar stories, those wonderfully famous exaggerations of yesterday's flying adventures. Everyone at the table will be an aviation historian on some level, each with his or her own wealth of knowledge, each happy to tell you about it.

On Autopilot

Article | Feb 01, 2005

A trim-steady digital autopilot Digital autopilots have been around since the Apollo Space Program in the early 1960s, when Grumman developed an autopilot using a digital microprocessor to manage analog inputs from the control and navigation systems on board the lunar module. But while computers have helped steer the course for decades, we're now on the cusp of having completely digital autopilot systems flying our light singles and twins as we enjoy a cup of coffee.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2005

Exxon Flyin' Tiger goes higher than ever Bruce Bohannon flogged his turbocharged Exxon Flyin' Tiger higher than ever before on November 13 to 47,500 feet, setting two new 12,000-meter time-to-climb world records in the process, but fell short of the intended goal of 50,000 feet. The Tiger now has a total of 30 records.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2004

Aerobatic air racing comes to Reno Top aerobatic pilots now have a new playing field. In its U.S.

Never Again

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2004

That morning began as most Saturdays did, with the weekly routine of flying with my longtime partner. While preparing to leave the house for Montgomery Field in San Diego, my eyes were drawn to the television screen showing the contrails of space shuttle Columbia disintegrating as it passed over clear Texas skies.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2004

Bohannon to try for altitude record in fall Record-holder Bruce Bohannon plans this fall to flog his Exxon Flyin' Tiger to the altitude record he sought at Oshkosh when mechanical problems literally let him down, but not before reaching 45,500 feet. His goal was 50,100 feet.

The Leavenworth Link

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2004

They're tucked away now — what's left of them — in barns, garages, warehouses, and other places where neglect reigns. But in their day they inspired fear and respect, and any military pilot wanting wings had to make peace with them.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2004

SpaceShipOne enters a new frontier Propelled by a hybrid rocket engine, 63-year-old Mike Melvill crossed the threshold of space in the composite construction SpaceShipOne on June 21. Melvill reached an unofficial altitude of 328,491 feet (62 miles) before a world audience.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2004

Joe F. Edwards' former business card bore one word after his name, Astronaut.

Never Again Online: Dangerous space

Article | Jun 01, 2004

I could have seen the whites of the copilot's eyes — if he hadn't been wearing sunglasses. Standing on the left rudder and heaving the Cessna 172RG Cutlass nearly to knife edge, I aimed for the tail of the Shorts Sherpa.

Postcards

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2004

Easy does it in Bend, Oregon If you happen to be one of those lucky folks who owns a Lancair, chances are you know Bend as well as your own backyard. If you don't, it's a relatively well-kept secret on the eastern slopes of the central Oregon Cascades.

Test Pilot

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2004

GENERAL From reader Bill Worden: How did over in radiotelephony come to mean, "My transmission is ended, and I expect a reply from you"? From reader Jeff Pardo: Why do controllers use the term squawk when asking pilots to transmit a particular transponder code? Why are pilots making straight-in approaches to Runway 34L/R at the New Tokyo International Airport (Narita, Japan) required to lower their landing gear prior to crossing the shoreline (about 14 nm from the airport)? Rainfall is measured in inches. What does a reported rainfall of 2 inches mean, for example? What is the world's hottest city (according to the World Meteorlogical Organization)? Estimate within four years the average age of all active U.S.

Postcards

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2004

Eye to eye with Washington, Jefferson, Roosevelt, Lincoln...and Crazy Horse Few destinations are more exciting from the air than the Black Hills of South Dakota. While photographers gather to take pictures of the majestic beauty, they can only see a fraction of the awe-inspiring terrain.

Letters

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2004

History's new home With great delight I read Thomas B. Haines' January "Waypoints" ("Waypoints: History's New Home") concerning the Smithsonian Institution's new National Air and Space Museum.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2004

How to see Florida in a weekend — all of it Two Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU) students have given new meaning to the words weekend flying — Ben Riecken, 21, and John Palombo, 18, in August established a record for landing at all of Florida's hard-surface nonmilitary airports. That's 105.

Waypoints

Product Brief | Jan 01, 2004

Editor in Chief Thomas B. Haines is anxious to make another pilgrimage to the new NASM, the Steven F.

Test Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2003

GENERAL My head was struck by a propeller, and I was so far gone that last rites were delivered at the hospital. I survived and later set (and still hold) an around-the-world speed record (westbound) as well as a nonstop, unrefueled distance record in a lightplane.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2003

His résumé doesn't tell the whole story. It indicates he went here, did that, then went elsewhere.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2003

When asked about Gerry Molidor Jr., just about anyone who knows him will reply, "He's such a nice guy." Molidor can always find time to give a short aerobatics demonstration or a quick aerodynamics lesson. Molidor has experienced just about everything civilian aviation has to offer.

Test Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2003

GENERAL From reader B.F. "Froggy" Worden: Why does a placard on the instrument panel of some Luscombe 8As recommend that the pilot apply carburetor heat for takeoff and initial climb even when there is absolutely no chance of carburetor ice? John F.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2003

News hound recalls aerial journalism in 1920s Garner Emerson may be 90 but his mind is still as sharp as it was while working on board a news photography airplane in the 1920s. During an interview this spring, he recalled his days as a teenage "cabin boy" aboard a Waco E owned by the New York Daily News.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2003

No one knows the Wright brothers like Tom Crouch, and he never met either of them. Crouch is the senior curator of aeronautics at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, and his specialty is, yup, the Wrights.

AOPA Action in California

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2003

Low-cost housing could threaten Long Beach Residential encroachment on airport operations is reaching new heights at Long Beach Airport/ Daugherty Field, according to AOPA Airport Support Network volunteer Candace Robinson. Boeing is reportedly seeking permits to build more than 450 low-cost housing units on the north side of the airport.

Sky Artist

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2003

How can a skywriting story also cover mutt dogs, airplanes of no known model, spy planes, the Red Baron, and movies? Just watch. First, the skywriting story.

AOPA Centennial of Flight Sweepstakes

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2003

Prospecting Long Island's ghost airports for our Waco's history There was no guarantee that sauntering among three Long Island, New York, airports used by our AOPA Sweepstakes Waco in the early 1940s would yield clues to its past. One, Floyd Bennett Memorial Field, is now a ghost airport waiting for restoration by the National Park Service.

Test Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2003

GENERAL What was the first airplane to have interconnected controls (roll and yaw control combined)? Who was the first AOPA member to travel into space aboard a spacecraft? In terms of the number of aircraft to roll off the assembly line, what is the most popular small twin (less than 12,500 pounds) ever certified in the United States? Who was the only astronaut to fly aboard each of the first three generations of U.S. spacecraft: Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo? The first airmail carried aboard an airplane in the United States was flown by what famous pilot during what famous flight? What airplanes are colloquially referred to as t-bones, and what other airplanes are called bones? A glider pilot experiencing a tow-rope break shortly after takeoff is in a situation similar to that of a single-engine pilot encountering power failure after takeoff.

Test Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2002

GENERAL The highest temperature ever recorded in the United States was 134 degrees F in Death Valley, California (1913). Estimate within 5 degrees the highest dew point ever recorded in the United States.

Test Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2002

GENERAL What well-known, post-World War II general aviation airplane was designed and manufactured without ailerons? Name the women who were the first of their gender to a) travel into space; b) become a space-shuttle commander; c) make a blind (zero-zero) landing; d) fly at night; and e) become a U.S. airline pilot.

California Action

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2002

California Division of Aeronautics begins economic study In an attempt to define the direct and indirect impact of airports, the aviation industry, and the commercial space industry on the state's economy, the California Division of Aeronautics has launched a statewide economic impact study. The Aviation Economic Impact Study will be overseen by an advisory committee that includes AOPA Regional Representative John Pfeifer.

Hangar Talk

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2002

Cardinal pilots are justly proud of their airplanes, as Associate Editor Julie K. Boatman found out while researching the cover story, "Budget Buys: Cardinal Flier," beginning on page 82.

75th Anniversary

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2002

Remembering the flight that changed the course of history The Spirit of St. Louis is perhaps the most famous and recognizable aircraft of all time.

AOPA's 2001 Bonanza Sweepstakes

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2002

New Mexico pilot wins the AOPA Sweepstakes Bonanza In September 2000, N14422, a somewhat-neglected 1966 Beechcraft V35 Bonanza, was chosen to become the 2001 AOPA Sweepstakes airplane. That project ended on the last day of February 2002 in Mineral Wells, Texas, as Norm and Joyce Elliott gazed in amazement at their new airplane.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2002

Oregon builder accepts Hughes challenge Recluse Howard Hughes told his aircraft design team never to talk about the technology of the Hughes Racer, the monoplane now on display at the Smithsonian Institution National Air and Space Museum that set a landplane speed record of 352.4 mph in 1935. (An open-cockpit Italian seaplane that flew 441 mph held the ultimate record at that time.) He told them, "Bad things will happen to you." They never talked and never learned what those "bad things" were, but they never doubted that Hughes was capable of doing them.

Pilot Products

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2002

Sporty's SP-200 nav/com A handheld transceiver usually rates as one of the must-have items in a pilot's flight bag, right up there with a headset, a flashlight, a lucky charm, and a dog-eared NASA ASRS form. While the lure of unhurried flight in a pre-1950, fabric-covered taildragger rose-tinges our daydreams, today's reality means that even in that time-travel aircraft it's a good idea to have an aerial walkie-talkie to keep you out of hot water.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2002

It's sunny and 70 degrees, but it's Monday and that means it's a day of meetings at Edwards Air Force Base. So test pilot Gordon Fullerton won't be up flying anything today.

Waypoints

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2001

Editor in Chief Thomas B. Haines has been covering the general aviation industry for 15 years.

Never Again

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2001

In the summer of 1977, I flew with a colleague from Islip, New York, on Long Island, to Washington, D.C., for a conference with Adm. A.

Lifting Young Spirits

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2001

In memory of a can-do man Few have experienced the gray area of aviation — the haunting feeling of being caught somewhere between life and death, and returning, just barely, with the mind intact but with a body that doesn't function as it once did. It doesn't seem fair, but once the anger subsides, there's a new sense of contentness and a feeling of mission.

Skyway Patrol

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2000

Opportunities for viewing a space shuttle launch from your airplane have improved, thanks to an increasing frequency of flights to support the International Space Station. Flights are scheduled at the rate of one a month through the end of 2000, and will increase from an average of four or five flights a year to eight in 2001.

Postcards

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2000

Where airplanes fly in, but seldom fly out Several hundred Phantoms are parked under the desert sun, waiting to be turned into Zombies. Not all will be chosen.

The Buzz About Haptics

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2000

Kristy Stokke's long blond hair floats haphazardly and her feet slowly slide above her head. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology senior is struggling to conduct an experiment in zero-G conditions.

Pilot Counsel

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2000

There is good news and bad news. The bad news—well, maybe it would be better to call it sad news—is that celebrated airshow pilot Bob Hoover has announced that he is canceling his performances scheduled for the rest of this year.

Test Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2000

GENERAL Helium provides buoyancy and maintains the shape of a blimp (as it does a child’s balloon). As a blimp climbs, helium—like any gas—expands.