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Celebrate 2015 National Aviation Day

Article | Aug 18, 2015

Aviators can help celebrate National Aviation Day Aug. 19 by flying to favorite destinations, introducing friends to flying, or attending discounted U.S. aviation events.

The flying toothbrush

Article | Jul 22, 2015

Canadian pilot Raphaël Langumier’s 4-year-old daughter took a shine to aerobatics. Now, Léa wanted to know, how does a toothbrush float in outer space?

NASA tests ELTs

Article | Jul 07, 2015

A Cessna Skyhawk was very much the worse for wear after NASA finished testing four off-the-shelf ELTs.

Letters: From our June 2015 issue

Pilot Magazine | Jul 06, 2015

Wow! We received a tremendous number of responses to Tom Haines’ editorial on the problems with solving the declining pilot population.

Pilots, business leaders gather in Wyoming

Article | Jun 29, 2015

Some 150 members of the Aviation Network of the Young Presidents’ Organization met for the second year in a row at Wyoming’s scenic Alpine Airport for three days of seminars, networking, recreation, and, of course, flying.

Drones edge into NAS: 'Sense and avoid' tech tested

Article | Jun 24, 2015

NASA continues to test technology giving large drones capability to detect and avoid other aircraft, and invites pilots to join a meeting of minds.

NASA to fly Tecnam twin in research project

Article | Mar 23, 2015

A modified Tecnam P2006T twin-engine airplane has been chosen to move NASA's Leading Edge Asynchronous Propeller Technology project from ground runs to flight testing.

Filmmakers moving forward on Burt Rutan documentary

Article | Feb 24, 2015

A career spent “democratizing flight” is entering the realm of documentary movie-making as two filmmakers launch a project to tell Burt Rutan’s story.

SpaceShipTwo crashes during test flight

Article | Oct 31, 2014

One Scaled Composites test pilot is dead and another injured after a “serious anomaly” and crash of Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShipTwo during a test flight Oct. 31, the company confirmed.

NASA develops Alaska app

Article | Oct 09, 2014

NASA has presented to Alaskan officials the basic ingredients for a satellite-based weather and traffic service for pilots operating in remote areas.

Cool Aerial Shots October 2014

Article | Sep 26, 2014

A strong cold front sweeping through England recently ignited strong showers and storms. One of the storms passing through the Midlands spawned a menacing funnel cloud or possible tornado near East Midlands airport, which was photographed just as a Ryanair jet was taking off. However, it’s not clear if the vortex photographed is an actual tornado, because there is no view of the ground. In order for a funnel cloud to be classified as a tornado, it must make ground contact. Credit: Alamy News Team, from ITV News

Not your average summer job

Article | Jul 24, 2014

Most teens are spending the summer working, whether it is at the pool, a retail store, or even at the airport or FBO. But 500 students from around the United States are spending their summer interning at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center on projects that are on the cutting edge of science and technology.

Inflatable flying saucer preps for test flight over Hawaii

Article | Jun 05, 2014

A NASA team is preparing to launch a rocket-powered, saucer-shaped test vehicle into near-space from a Navy facility in Hawaii to evaluate a technology that could help pave the way for human exploration of Mars.

Collier Trophy awarded for carrier-based unmanned system

Article | Apr 15, 2014

The National Aeronautic Association has awarded the Collier Trophy for “the first unmanned, autonomous air system operating from an aircraft carrier.”

A plane-crazy America

Pilot Magazine | Apr 08, 2014

The realization may not immediately spring to mind, but the fact is that general aviation’s mass appeal has always been powerful over the past 100-plus years.

Student rocket competition aiming higher

Article | Mar 12, 2014

They may not be NASA scientists, but they are doing work just as if they are.

NASA sleuths solve 'jelly doughnut' mystery

Article | Mar 12, 2014

Where did the jelly doughnut come from?

Google to lease historic airfield

Article | Feb 20, 2014

A subsidiary of the tech giant Google was chosen by NASA to lease and rehabilitate the historic Moffett Federal Airfield in California’s Silicon Valley.

NavWorx ADS-B at FL950

Article | Feb 11, 2014

An automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) transceiver developed for general aviation was recently used to test the technology at a much higher altitude: 95,000 feet.

Driven by dreams

Article | Feb 10, 2014

The 2013 Collier Trophy nominees include a diverse mix of pedal power, hypersonic speed, and voyaging to deep space.

Cool Stuff

Article | Jan 21, 2014

A wheeled vehicle has not been on the moon’s surface since the 1970s. Until December, that is.

Cool Stuff

Article | Jan 21, 2014

In November, a group of high school students accomplished something no other high school students have ever done: a satellite they built was launched into space.

Space tourism seen launching in 2014

Article | Jan 16, 2014

Attention future space travelers: A glance at the board lists your flight as on time, for sometime later this year.

Mission to 'Mars'

Pilot Magazine | Dec 19, 2013

Loaded near maximum weight, a flight of two Quest Kodiaks cruised in the Arctic summer sky over vast swaths of barren tundra and sea ice fraught with history.

Six 'pioneers' to join aviation hall of fame

Article | Dec 17, 2013

Six aviation trail-blazers including the first female U.S. jet airline captain, an Apollo astronaut, an air racer, a record-setting test pilot, and a pair of brothers renowned for aircraft design innovation will be enshrined in the National Aviation Hall of Fame in 2014.

NASA tests insect solutions

Article | Nov 27, 2013

A small team of specialists at NASA’s Langley Research Center has taken to the skies in a Falcon jet hunting bugs.

Event Spotlight

Article | Nov 11, 2013

Five aircraft loaded with clothes, blankets, food, and toys left airports around Maryland and flew to Carl A. Spaatz Field in Reading, Pennsylvania. It was part of the NASA Goddard Flying Club’s annual Wings of Warmth event.

Artist and astronaut honored at convention

Article | Oct 24, 2013

One who traveled in space and another who paints aviation scenes--their common bond is their passion for flight and their recent recognition for their work.

NBAA to host Teachers' Day at annual event

Article | Oct 08, 2013

The National Business Aviation Association will host a Build A Plane Teachers' Day at its annual meeting.

Hyperloop

Article | Oct 03, 2013

Futuristic high-speed Hyperloop would allow travel on air

October's Historical Firsts

Article | Oct 03, 2013

 Oct. 1, 1958 — NASA formally opens for business. Its first administrator was T. Keith Glennan, the president of Case Institute of Technology and a former member of the Atomic Energy Commission. (Left to Right-Glennan, Dryden, Horner)

Orbital Sciences aims for ISS rendezvous

Article | Sep 05, 2013

Orbital Sciences will launch a cargo-hauling spacecraft Sept. 17 for a first rendezvous with the International Space Station.

Pilot Counsel: ASRS

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2013

It seems time again to remind pilots about the FAA’s Aviation Safety Reporting Program (ASRP), administered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS).

NASA crashes helo to improve safety

Article | Aug 29, 2013

NASA on Aug. 28 dropped a CH-46 Sea Knight helicopter fuselage with test dummies on board to test seat belts and gather data.

NASA: 3-D printed rocket part holds up in test

Article | Aug 27, 2013

NASA reports 3-D printed fuel injector sets rocket power milestone.

Angel Flight West launches Endeavour Awards

Article | Aug 14, 2013

Angel Flight West’s new Endeavour Awards put the spotlight on public benefit flying.

Cool Stuff: ISS Selects 8 Astronauts

Article | Jul 25, 2013

Want to be an astronaut someday? The job requires you to pass a physical, be a U.S. citizen with a bachelor’s degree in engineering, biological science, physical science or mathematics, and have 1,000 or more hours logged as a jet pilot.

Cool Stuff: Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo

Article | Jul 25, 2013

Virgin Galactic founder Sir Richard Branson and his family will be the first tourists to blast into sub-orbital space on the maiden voyage of SpaceShipTwo in December.

NASA 747 scans southern sky

Article | Jul 23, 2013

A Boeing 747 modified to carry a massive telescope is plying the southern skies for science.

Aldrin lends star power to PayPal Galactic

Article | Jun 28, 2013

Astronaut Buzz Aldrin was the star of the show as PayPal announced plans to develop space currency.

NASA dirigible hangar at Moffett up for grabs

Article | Jun 05, 2013

NASA can't afford to operate the private Moffett Federal Field and can't restore the 1,100-foot-long Hangar One that housed dirigibles in the 1930s. Hopefully a private contractor will come to the rescue.

Proficient Pilot: Reflections, 1963-2013

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2013

My first magazine article, “Why Not Really Learn to Navigate,” appeared in these pages exactly 50 years ago (June 1963).

Cool Stuff: NASA launches smartphone satellites

Article | Jun 01, 2013

You can make calls on a smartphone, send and receive emails, edit Office documents, or add seemingly endless apps. But now you can add one more thing to the list of what smartphones can do. On April 21, three smartphones became low-cost satellites after they rode to space aboard the maiden flight of Orbital Science Corp.'s Antares.

The Unlikeliest Astronaut

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2013

Alone in the sleek, composite shell of an experimental spacecraft he helped build, suspended beneath the broad wings of the 'White Knight' carrier airplane, test pilot Mike Melvill is glad to finally get busy.

NASA project provides critical tool for water management

Article | May 06, 2013

A Twin Otter packed with sensors has begun a three-year quest to measure mountain snowpack with unprecedented precision.

Flight training to the extreme

Article | Apr 25, 2013

A training and research center just outside of Philadelphia specializes in pushing pilots to the limits of human physiology, and offers to civilians a range of experiences that are otherwise reserved for military aviators.

Burt Rutan developing new seaplane

Article | Apr 09, 2013

Two years after retirement, Burt Rutan is at it again, developing a new seaplane called the Skigull at his cabin near Coeur d’Alene, Idaho. At first he thought he had an original design, a tandem-seat twin-engine amphibian that rises from the water on skis but can land on snow, grass, and if you must, a paved airport.

ASF - Aircraft Deicing/Anti-icing Equipment

Article | Mar 25, 2013

Aircraft Deicing and Anti-icing Equipment The resources listed below are provided as additional information to the AOPA Air Safety Foundation's Aircraft Deicing and Anti-icing Equipment Safety Advisor. The links below provide information on icing accident statistics, weather flying strategies, certification of aircraft, and suggestions on how to tell if your aircraft is approved for flight in known icing conditions.

Mars exploration earns NASA/JPL a Collier Trophy

Article | Mar 14, 2013

The National Aeronautic Association awarded the 2012 Robert J. Collier Trophy to the NASA /JPL Mars Science Laboratory/Curiosity Project Team. The team the same day revealed that Mars might have once supported a habitable environment, based on analysis of a rock found near an ancient stream bed.

AOPA Live to stream women in space presentations

Article | Mar 07, 2013

AOPA Live will run a live stream of presentations honoring 50 years of women in space during the Women Fly it Forward event at Frederick Municipal Airport in Frederick, Md., on March 9.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2013

Mosquito bomber heading for U.S. Restoration took place in New Zealand By Alton K.

Women of Aviation Worldwide Week seeks volunteers

Article | Feb 14, 2013

The Institute for Women of Aviation Worldwide is looking for organizations and individuals to get involved in activities March 4 through10. This year's events will celebrate 50 years of women in space.

Aeronautical milestones compete for Collier Trophy

Article | Feb 05, 2013

Seven projects and teams that advanced aviation and aerospace during 2012 are in the running to receive the National Aeronautic Association’s Robert J. Collier Trophy when a new recipient is selected March 11.

Other cool stuff: NASA rocketry challenge

AV8RS | Feb 01, 2013

There’s nothing like dreaming high, reaching for the stars …. even blasting off.

David Clark: 70 years of flying under pressure

Article | Jan 24, 2013

Red Bull Stratos jumper Felix Baumgartner, U-2 pilots, and NASA astronauts from John Glenn to Neil Armstrong, among other high fliers, have a tailor in common, and a connection that extends to every general aviation pilot who flies with pale green ear cups.

NASA funds ‘green’ aviation technology partnerships

Article | Jan 10, 2013

NASA has selected eight promising green aviation technology projects to test in real-world conditions, with the goal of making future aviation more efficient and quieter, and reducing environmental impact.

AOPA Action

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2013

Responding to member concerns, AOPA and the Experimental Aircraft Association will request an exemption that would allow many pilots flying the most common single-engine aircraft recreationally to use a driver's license and self-certification medical standard.

Former Cessna chair, Tuskegee CFI to join hall of fame

Article | Dec 19, 2012

A former Cessna chairman who used money from air racing prizes to meet payroll during the Depression is among the inductees to the National Aviation Hall of Fame, the board of trustees announced Dec. 17.

NASA announces plan for next Mars rover

Article | Dec 06, 2012

Mars rovers Curiosity and Opportunity have company coming in 2020, provided NASA's budget survives the current federal negotiations.

Curiosity finding 'good dirt' on Red Planet's evolution

AV8RS | Dec 01, 2012

NASA’s Curiosity rover is literally digging up dirt and finding information that is helping to unlock mysteries of the Red Planet.

SpaceX completes first cargo delivery to space station

AV8RS | Dec 01, 2012

You can tame wild horses or even feral cats. But astronauts living on the International Space Station have one up on you.

NASA engineers test rotor reentry

Article | Nov 13, 2012

Spacecraft of the future may one day settle in to soft landings using technology familiar to helicopter pilots, and tested - at least at the early scale model stage - using off-the-shelf equipment from a hobby shop.

Visual Approach

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2012

AOPA photographer Mike Fizer relates his take on photographing the Diamond C1 in South Park Basin, Colorado.

NASA research zeroes in on new cure for queasy

Article | Oct 15, 2012

Relief for queasy fliers? A fast-acting nasal spray to combat motion sickness is being prepared for mass consumption.

SpaceX delivers the goods to International Space Station

Article | Oct 11, 2012

Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX) is leading the pack of private contractors, having returned to American hands the ability to fly cargo to the International Space Station.

Fly-Outs: Splash and dash, or stay awhile

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2012

From waterpark to wineries, McMinnville has it all

GA airports, states race to serve outer space

Article | Sep 27, 2012

Space tourism, scientific research, and commercial spaceflight offer the promise of lucrative trade for airports, and jobs for the future. State and local officials are racing to get their flags planted.

NAA honors aviation careers of service

Article | Sep 26, 2012

The National Aeronautic Association has announced that it will honor well-known aviation educators Martha and John King of King Schools for significant contributions to pilot training at a ceremony Nov. 13.

NASA high flyer tests new technology

Article | Sep 20, 2012

Cruising above 60,000 feet over the East Coast, a NASA ER-2 (a variant of the venerable U-2) is testing new sensors designed for satellites that will eventually keep tabs on clouds, aerosol vapors, and foliage, among other things. The flight crews will share an operating base with the hurricane-hunting Global Hawk unmanned aircraft systems.

NASA launches five-year hurricane hunt

Article | Sep 12, 2012

What do the Saharan Air Layer and hurricanes have in common? NASA is banking on Global Hawk UAVs overflying the storms to see if a connection lies between the two.

NASA mission could help protect GPS

Article | Sep 05, 2012

NASA has launched a two-year effort to learn how better to predict the behavior of the Van Allen radiation belts that circle Earth, behavior that can at times threaten GPS and other satellite communications. Two satellites are orbiting through the belts of highly charged particles that protect the planet from solar storms and "space weather."

New take on ‘X’ plane wins NASA grant

Article | Sep 05, 2012

Cleared for Mach 2 after departure, this supersonic jet of the future would yaw 90 degrees and put a new set of wings into the wind.

NASA's 'Curiosity' lands on Red Planet

AV8RS | Sep 01, 2012

If it took you eight months to get to your destination 352 million miles away, what would be the first thing you’d do on arrival?

Nation mourns Armstrong

Article | Aug 27, 2012

Taking "one small step" on July 20, 1969, Apollo 11 Commander Neil Armstrong cemented in lunar dust his place in history as the first man to walk on the moon. Armstrong, an avid aviator throughout his life, died Aug. 25.

NASA awards $1.1 billion for manned spacecraft development

Article | Aug 06, 2012

Three companies have been awarded contracts to continue development of spacecraft able to shuttle astronauts to and from the International Space Station in years to come, with NASA divvying up $1.1 billion in potential awards over the coming two years.

‘Seven minutes of triumph’

Article | Aug 06, 2012

It was an instrument approach like no other, billed in advance as "seven minutes of terror" and ending with a triumphant celebration at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory control room in Pasadena, Calif. The NASA Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity was deposited in a gravel field, and beamed back the first photos from the surface, marking the end of the most dangerous phase of the mission.

Sally Ride: Astronaut, pathfinder, scientist dies at 61

Article | Jul 24, 2012

Sally Kristen Ride took her place in history on June 18, 1983, blasting into orbit aboard the Space Shuttle "Challenger", the first American woman in space. Ride, 61, lost a 17-month battle with cancer on July 23.

Future astronauts may count on inflatable heat shields

Article | Jul 23, 2012

A NASA test July 23 proved that an inflatable heat shield can stand up to the searing heat of atmospheric reentry, proving in the real world a concept with promise to facilitate travel to other planets--and a lightweight alternative to heavy heat shields protecting capsules returning to Earth.

NASA reporting progress on return to manned spaceflight

Article | Jul 19, 2012

A nation of space enthusiasts still smarting from the end of the space shuttle program may look forward to 2014, when NASA plans the first orbital test of the Orion space capsule, designed to carry astronauts to asteroids, Mars, and elsewhere in the solar system.

Mars rover may have trouble closing flight plan

Article | Jul 17, 2012

While there is no pay phone on Mars, Curiosity might end up needing one, at least for a little while. With less than three weeks left in a journey of 352 million miles from Earth to Mars, the Mars Science Laboratory rover is lined up for an always-risky landing, one that predecessors have failed more often than not.

Spaceport launches new look, plans expanded tours

Article | Jul 11, 2012

The gateway to civilian space travel is quickly taking shape in the New Mexico desert, and Spaceport America celebrated landing a certificate of occupancy for its operations center with a new website, logo, and a promise of expanded tours for the curious this summer.

Conference focuses on space station science

Article | Jul 02, 2012

Engineers and scientists from a broad range of disciplines gathered in Colorado June 26 through 28 to reflect on past and future achievements, and be formally introduced to a new nonprofit organization chosen by NASA to manage the science taking place in the U.S. National Laboratory aboard the International Space Station.

GA pilot lands Emerging Explorer support

Article | Jun 12, 2012

The National Geographic Society has chosen Barrington Irving, the youngest pilot to circumnavigate the world in history, among 2012's Emerging Explorers. Irving's next mission will be flying around the world at 45,000 feet in an Embraer while beaming live lessons to students.

Curiosity takes closer aim at Mars landing

Article | Jun 11, 2012

A combination of in-flight calibration and improved simulations have allowed NASA and its partners to plan a more precise landing on Mars by Curiosity, mankind's first rover with tools to drill into rock - including one in particular that researchers are "quite fond of."

Passenger space pioneer cleared for supersonic tests

Article | Jun 04, 2012

Scaled Composites has secured FAA permission to light the rocket motor on SpaceShipTwo in flight, clearing the way for continued tests of a vehicle designed to carry Virgin Galactic passengers to space.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2012

Gyro or fixed-wing? Flying cars progress in the Netherlands, U.S. If flying cars become a reality, drivers will have to become certificated pilots.

SpaceX capsule delivers cargo to space station

Article | May 30, 2012

Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX) made history May 25 as the first private company to dock a spacecraft with the International Space Station.

Private rocket launches for space station docking

Article | May 24, 2012

The Falcon 9 rocket's engines ignited in the early-morning darkness May 22, launching a mission to send the first commercial spacecraft to rendezvous with the International Space Station.

NASA takes synthetic vision to the next level

Article | May 17, 2012

Engineers at the NASA Langley Research Center who developed synthetic vision technology are now working to put it right before your eyes. A head-worn display that tracks your gaze and is mounted on an ordinary eyeglass frame promises to project critical information, including traffic and terrain, in zero visibility.

NASA hunts meteorite with airship

Article | May 07, 2012

The remains of an asteroid similar to those that may have launched life on Earth crashed into Northern California on April 22. NASA scientist Peter Jenniskens hopes to collect footage from terrestrial security and surveillance cameras to track down missing pieces.

Many pilots play roles in next chapter of spaceflight

Article | Apr 26, 2012

A successful test of parachutes that will safely ease the Orion manned spacecraft to landing was overshadowed by the final flight of the space shuttle Discovery on April 17. In Houston, the Arizona desert, and elsewhere, Orion's test and development crew, many of them pilots, were focused on the future.