STOL Kit

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Major firms join electric aircraft discussion

Article | May 01, 2012

Wheel motors that can help accelerate an electric aircraft to liftoff within 100 feet or less will mark the next phase in the development of electric aircraft, with near-whisper-quiet designs soon to follow.

Safety Pilot Landmark Accidents: Calm in chaos

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2012

Overlooking basic things is the cause of many accidents. Fail to set a critical cockpit control for takeoff and takeoff doesn’t occur.

Proficient Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2012

The expression "behind the curve" apparently has to do with being on the left side of the so-called bell curve, the type of curve that many teachers use to issue grades. Being behind the curve also refers to something or someone unable to keep up with the norm.

The Maine Event

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2011

The AOPA 2012 Sweepstakes "Tougher Than a Tornado" Husky can seem as out of place at a big airport as a monster truck on the streets of Manhattan. The Husky was designed and built in Wyoming for flying throughout the rugged and expansive West - so what happens if its eventual winner is an East Coast city slicker? Could an airplane optimized for rough, high-altitude airports be useful in other regions where elevations are low, distances are short, and paved airports are plentiful?

Where flying is 'still fun'

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2011

There are only a handful of days before the Memorial Day weekend and at the north end of Lake Washington just outside Seattle, there is a buzz of activity surrounding a group of de Havilland Beavers and Otters. The lake is more than 20 miles long and for more than 65 years its northern tip has been home to the largest floatplane operator in the country. With the unofficial start to the summer season just days away, Kenmore Air is busy preparing its fleet of floatplanes for the busiest time of the year.

Safety Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2011

Where to draw the safety line in GA will always be debated because opinions and operations are so varied. There are pilots in our system who shouldn’t be flying and some who never should have been certificated in the first place—as in all other personal activities. How to fairly identify and remove them on a consistent basis is a vexing problem. The Air Safety Institute has more than 30 free online courses, publishes a quiz every other week, and offers about 200 free live seminars annually. What more should we do? Are you convinced that the government can make GA much safer than it already is, without a significant reduction in your freedom to fly? That’s really up to us, as pilots in command. So the next time someone tosses off the GA/airline safety stats for shock value, ask them if they equate the high banks of Daytona with the supermarket parking lot.

Letters

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2011

I enjoyed the article about the Jabiru J230-SP in June’s AOPA Pilot (“Prime Time for the Jabiru”), but am at a loss to understand the 104-degree-Fahrenheit operational limitation. Is there a degradation in airframe strength when heated? Is the expansion rate of the dissimilar materials likely to cause delamination? Will this be a problem if the aircraft sits on the ramp when it is up to 120 degrees in the sun? I used to fly a Mooney out of Chico, California, where it often was more than 104 degrees F.

AOPA 2011 Crossover Classic Sweeps

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2011

AOPA’s 2011 sweepstakes airplane—a 1974 Cessna Skylane we’re calling the “Crossover Classic”—has passed a huge milestone. On January 26, 2011, Advantage Avionics of Chino, California, finished its eight-week, 300-man-hour instrument panel mega-installation.

V2 variables

Article | Apr 01, 2011

Click the image for a larger version. Many of the new V-speeds taught to first-time jet pilots are only used in the event of an engine failure.

Quest Kodiak: A higher calling

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2011

After logging thousands of flight hours in iconic Howard DGA–15s beginning as a teenager, California rancher Bruce Dickenson developed his own ideas for making the relatively fast and powerful airplanes from the 1930s and 1940s even better.