NASA

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Letters

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2008

Mooney Acclaim Type S: A Piston Rocket As a former executive at Columbia Aircraft, I read Ian Twombly’s story on the Mooney Acclaim Type S with interest (“Mooney Acclaim Type S: A Piston Rocket,” September AOPA Pilot). Obviously, keeping that number-one speed ranking for the Columbia 400 was important to us but the simple reality was that aircraft we were building during 2006 and beyond were not meeting book specifications, so we had already (privately) lost that race before the Type S came to market.

Turbine Edition: Acquisitions

Article | Oct 01, 2008

For the guy who has everything OK, Father’s Day rolled around again and you, once again, committed the buy-him-a-tie copout. Now nears a landmark birthday.

Turbine Edition: Turbines Around the World

Article | Oct 01, 2008

What’s your idea of the dream adventure of a lifetime? It probably involves flying a high-performance, luxury airplane to exotic lands on a leisurely schedule, staying at five-star hotels along the way. And what about having agents setting up your flight plans, securing overflight permits, providing your meals, and giving you tours of scenic and historic locations as well? Turns out that such an adventure can indeed be yours—for $55,000 per head.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2007

Here's how you fly the Vomit Comet: At 30,000 feet dive until the modified McDonnell Douglas DC-9 (C-9) hits 350 knots, pull the nose up 60 degrees — that's 1.8 Gs — until you reach 240 knots, then unload. Repeat 40 times and call it a day.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2007

Summer Williams is what you might call a triple threat: She's a NASA engineer, she's logged 19 years as a dancer and cheerleader, and, as you can probably discern from her appearing on this page, she's also a private pilot. She took her first flight as a 10-year-old native of tiny Anthony, Kansas, on a commercial airliner.

President's Position

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2007

Phil Boyer has served as AOPA's president since January 1, 1991. In her continuing quest to "sell" the agency's financing proposal, FAA Administrator Marion Blakey recently stated, "You know, GPS is the law of the land in virtually every other business and logistic situation that we have.

Answers for Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2006

Using the NASA form on your behalf Knowing you may have committed a regulatory violation is perhaps one of the worst feelings a pilot can have. Second only to the feeling of an accident, violations can range from the benign to the downright unsafe.

40 Top Technologies

Article | Aug 01, 2006

Direct to the cockpit In the early days of U.S. space programs, skeptics doubted the practical value of any new discoveries.

Spin Masters

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2006

A hawk soars off the shelf of green — the last bench of the Cumberland Plateau before the forest gives way to farmland, and to the stretch of Tennessee below. On this shelf sits the town of Sewanee, home to the University of the South, and the Franklin County Airport, home to William Kershner.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2006

NASA sets challenge for top GA aircraft If money is what really makes airplanes fly, NASA is ready to write some checks to pioneering general aviation pilots. As part of the broader NASA Centennial Challenges program, the agency is prepared to kick off the aeronautical component called the Personal Air Vehicle Challenge.

Capturing Sunlight

Article | Dec 01, 2005

"Feel that? I'll bet that's the trop." "Yeah, that's probably it." Bill Rieke, chief of aircraft operations at NASA's Glenn Research Center, is hand-flying a Learjet 25 from the right seat and Kurt Blankenship, the center's senior pilot and safety officer, is flying left seat as we pass through 37,000 feet about 50 miles east of Detroit. We're flying a solar-cell-calibration mission to collect data on the cells' performance.

Out of This World

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2005

Behind every great achievement is a support team that makes the incredibly difficult (and sometimes seemingly impossible) a reality. Such has always been the case with NASA's manned space program.

Hangar Talk

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2005

ADS-B (automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast) may well be one of the best-kept secrets in aviation. Few pilots seem to have heard of what seems destined to become one of the most significant new datalink technologies in general aviation cockpits.

Test Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2005

GENERAL What unique method did Japan and other countries use during the 1930s (before the advent of radar) to detect approaching enemy aircraft? According to the Aeronautical Information Manual, what is the most likely way for a pilot to inadvertently induce whiteout conditions? From reader Mark Barchenko: What does a modern U.S. naval destroyer have in common with a McDonnell Douglas DC-10? NASA's hypersonic X-43A, an unmanned research airplane, is powered by an air-breathing scramjet and flew at almost Mach 10 (10 times the speed of sound) on November 16, 2004.

Pilot Counsel

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2005

John S. Yodice and his associates provide legal counsel to AOPA's more than 400,000 members.

President's Position

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2005

AOPA President Phil Boyer and his wife own a 1977 Cessna 172. Most of us in aviation have become familiar with the NASA-FAA-Industry partnership called SATS, the Small Aircraft Transportation System.

Welcome to Moontown

Article | May 01, 2005

The red Alabama clay is packed hard into a surface solid enough for lawn bowling — at just shy of 2,200 feet long this grass strip makes an excellent partner whether you're flying an old Piper Cub or an old Mooney. Whether you're as light as a Quicksilver or Blanik, or as heavy as a "Big Annie" Antonov AN-2, slip down below the ridgeline to the west, get down to just a few feet over the hayfield on short final, flare just past the runway end lights — this is a 24-hour operation — and roll onto the smooth grass.

Flights of Fancy

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2005

Aviation has never been an industry to stand still. For years, new designs, ideas, and innovations were tested, scrapped, modified, or put into use, all in the interest of enhancing the general safety record of airplanes.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2004

Aerobatic air racing comes to Reno Top aerobatic pilots now have a new playing field. In its U.S.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2004

Bohannon to try for altitude record in fall Record-holder Bruce Bohannon plans this fall to flog his Exxon Flyin' Tiger to the altitude record he sought at Oshkosh when mechanical problems literally let him down, but not before reaching 45,500 feet. His goal was 50,100 feet.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2004

Joe F. Edwards' former business card bore one word after his name, Astronaut.

Never Again Online: Dangerous space

Article | Jun 01, 2004

I could have seen the whites of the copilot's eyes — if he hadn't been wearing sunglasses. Standing on the left rudder and heaving the Cessna 172RG Cutlass nearly to knife edge, I aimed for the tail of the Shorts Sherpa.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2004

Capt. Joe Kittinger didn't consider himself a skydiver and he certainly wasn't a paratrooper.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2003

11-pound airplane flies Atlantic Ocean Accomplishing the task required a dozen people with an impressive combination of aeronautical engineering talent and software-writing skills, but in the end it was a piece of luck that assured success. Maynard Hill, 77, finally has achieved his twenty-fourth and twenty-fifth world records using a model airplane: Both records came in August with the successful flight of an 11-pound airplane carrying 5.5 pounds of Coleman lantern fuel that traveled from Newfoundland to Ireland, a distance of 1,900 statute miles.