NASA

Items per page   10 | 25 | 50 | 100
51 to 100 of 170 results

Earhart namesake creates aviation foundation

Article | Apr 02, 2013

Denver television reporter and private pilot Amelia Rose Earhart has announced plans to create the Fly with Amelia Foundation, a Colorado nonprofit organization that will provide aviation opportunities, free aviation-based educational curriculum to grades K-12, and scholarships to fund flight training for young women. The foundation will work in partnership with the Wings Over the Rockies Air and Space Museum to engage the community in flight-based educational activities and promote the future of general aviation through the re-creation and symbolic completion of Amelia Earhart’s 1937 flight around the world in 2014, said Earhart.

ASF - Aircraft Deicing/Anti-icing Equipment

Article | Mar 25, 2013

Aircraft Deicing and Anti-icing Equipment The resources listed below are provided as additional information to the AOPA Air Safety Foundation's Aircraft Deicing and Anti-icing Equipment Safety Advisor. The links below provide information on icing accident statistics, weather flying strategies, certification of aircraft, and suggestions on how to tell if your aircraft is approved for flight in known icing conditions.

Mars exploration earns NASA/JPL a Collier Trophy

Article | Mar 14, 2013

The National Aeronautic Association awarded the 2012 Robert J. Collier Trophy to the NASA /JPL Mars Science Laboratory/Curiosity Project Team. The team the same day revealed that Mars might have once supported a habitable environment, based on analysis of a rock found near an ancient stream bed.

AOPA Live to stream women in space presentations

Article | Mar 07, 2013

AOPA Live will run a live stream of presentations honoring 50 years of women in space during the Women Fly it Forward event at Frederick Municipal Airport in Frederick, Md., on March 9.

Supersonic bizjet wing enters new test phase

Article | Feb 21, 2013

Aerion Corp. is moving closer to realizing the dream of a supersonic business jet.

Women of Aviation Worldwide Week seeks volunteers

Article | Feb 14, 2013

The Institute for Women of Aviation Worldwide is looking for organizations and individuals to get involved in activities March 4 through10. This year's events will celebrate 50 years of women in space.

Aeronautical milestones compete for Collier Trophy

Article | Feb 05, 2013

Seven projects and teams that advanced aviation and aerospace during 2012 are in the running to receive the National Aeronautic Association’s Robert J. Collier Trophy when a new recipient is selected March 11.

Other cool stuff: NASA rocketry challenge

AV8RS | Feb 01, 2013

There’s nothing like dreaming high, reaching for the stars …. even blasting off.

David Clark: 70 years of flying under pressure

Article | Jan 24, 2013

Red Bull Stratos jumper Felix Baumgartner, U-2 pilots, and NASA astronauts from John Glenn to Neil Armstrong, among other high fliers, have a tailor in common, and a connection that extends to every general aviation pilot who flies with pale green ear cups.

NASA funds ‘green’ aviation technology partnerships

Article | Jan 10, 2013

NASA has selected eight promising green aviation technology projects to test in real-world conditions, with the goal of making future aviation more efficient and quieter, and reducing environmental impact.

NASA announces plan for next Mars rover

Article | Dec 06, 2012

Mars rovers Curiosity and Opportunity have company coming in 2020, provided NASA's budget survives the current federal negotiations.

Curiosity finding 'good dirt' on Red Planet's evolution

AV8RS | Dec 01, 2012

NASA’s Curiosity rover is literally digging up dirt and finding information that is helping to unlock mysteries of the Red Planet.

SpaceX completes first cargo delivery to space station

AV8RS | Dec 01, 2012

You can tame wild horses or even feral cats. But astronauts living on the International Space Station have one up on you.

NASA engineers test rotor reentry

Article | Nov 13, 2012

Spacecraft of the future may one day settle in to soft landings using technology familiar to helicopter pilots, and tested - at least at the early scale model stage - using off-the-shelf equipment from a hobby shop.

Visual Approach

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2012

AOPA photographer Mike Fizer relates his take on photographing the Diamond C1 in South Park Basin, Colorado.

NASA report: Your 'get out of jail free' card?

Article | Oct 16, 2012

The Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS), known to many as the "NASA report," is designed to get valuable information about what is going on in the system from those who are actually using the system. But the best part is you may possibly 'get out of jail free' by sharing the information.

NASA research zeroes in on new cure for queasy

Article | Oct 15, 2012

Relief for queasy fliers? A fast-acting nasal spray to combat motion sickness is being prepared for mass consumption.

SpaceX delivers the goods to International Space Station

Article | Oct 11, 2012

Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX) is leading the pack of private contractors, having returned to American hands the ability to fly cargo to the International Space Station.

NAA honors aviation careers of service

Article | Sep 26, 2012

The National Aeronautic Association has announced that it will honor well-known aviation educators Martha and John King of King Schools for significant contributions to pilot training at a ceremony Nov. 13.

NASA high flyer tests new technology

Article | Sep 20, 2012

Cruising above 60,000 feet over the East Coast, a NASA ER-2 (a variant of the venerable U-2) is testing new sensors designed for satellites that will eventually keep tabs on clouds, aerosol vapors, and foliage, among other things. The flight crews will share an operating base with the hurricane-hunting Global Hawk unmanned aircraft systems.

NASA launches five-year hurricane hunt

Article | Sep 12, 2012

What do the Saharan Air Layer and hurricanes have in common? NASA is banking on Global Hawk UAVs overflying the storms to see if a connection lies between the two.

NASA mission could help protect GPS

Article | Sep 05, 2012

NASA has launched a two-year effort to learn how better to predict the behavior of the Van Allen radiation belts that circle Earth, behavior that can at times threaten GPS and other satellite communications. Two satellites are orbiting through the belts of highly charged particles that protect the planet from solar storms and "space weather."

New take on ‘X’ plane wins NASA grant

Article | Sep 05, 2012

Cleared for Mach 2 after departure, this supersonic jet of the future would yaw 90 degrees and put a new set of wings into the wind.

NASA's 'Curiosity' lands on Red Planet

AV8RS | Sep 01, 2012

If it took you eight months to get to your destination 352 million miles away, what would be the first thing you’d do on arrival?

NASA awards $1.1 billion for manned spacecraft development

Article | Aug 06, 2012

Three companies have been awarded contracts to continue development of spacecraft able to shuttle astronauts to and from the International Space Station in years to come, with NASA divvying up $1.1 billion in potential awards over the coming two years.

‘Seven minutes of triumph’

Article | Aug 06, 2012

It was an instrument approach like no other, billed in advance as "seven minutes of terror" and ending with a triumphant celebration at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory control room in Pasadena, Calif. The NASA Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity was deposited in a gravel field, and beamed back the first photos from the surface, marking the end of the most dangerous phase of the mission.

ASRS reports sought for safety studies

Article | Jul 31, 2012

NASA has asked general aviation pilots to participate in two special studies it is conducting with the FAA based on data collected through the Aviation Safety Reporting System.

Sally Ride: Astronaut, pathfinder, scientist dies at 61

Article | Jul 24, 2012

Sally Kristen Ride took her place in history on June 18, 1983, blasting into orbit aboard the Space Shuttle "Challenger", the first American woman in space. Ride, 61, lost a 17-month battle with cancer on July 23.

Future astronauts may count on inflatable heat shields

Article | Jul 23, 2012

A NASA test July 23 proved that an inflatable heat shield can stand up to the searing heat of atmospheric reentry, proving in the real world a concept with promise to facilitate travel to other planets--and a lightweight alternative to heavy heat shields protecting capsules returning to Earth.

NASA reporting progress on return to manned spaceflight

Article | Jul 19, 2012

A nation of space enthusiasts still smarting from the end of the space shuttle program may look forward to 2014, when NASA plans the first orbital test of the Orion space capsule, designed to carry astronauts to asteroids, Mars, and elsewhere in the solar system.

Mars rover may have trouble closing flight plan

Article | Jul 17, 2012

While there is no pay phone on Mars, Curiosity might end up needing one, at least for a little while. With less than three weeks left in a journey of 352 million miles from Earth to Mars, the Mars Science Laboratory rover is lined up for an always-risky landing, one that predecessors have failed more often than not.

Conference focuses on space station science

Article | Jul 02, 2012

Engineers and scientists from a broad range of disciplines gathered in Colorado June 26 through 28 to reflect on past and future achievements, and be formally introduced to a new nonprofit organization chosen by NASA to manage the science taking place in the U.S. National Laboratory aboard the International Space Station.

GA pilot lands Emerging Explorer support

Article | Jun 12, 2012

The National Geographic Society has chosen Barrington Irving, the youngest pilot to circumnavigate the world in history, among 2012's Emerging Explorers. Irving's next mission will be flying around the world at 45,000 feet in an Embraer while beaming live lessons to students.

Curiosity takes closer aim at Mars landing

Article | Jun 11, 2012

A combination of in-flight calibration and improved simulations have allowed NASA and its partners to plan a more precise landing on Mars by Curiosity, mankind's first rover with tools to drill into rock - including one in particular that researchers are "quite fond of."

SpaceX capsule delivers cargo to space station

Article | May 30, 2012

Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX) made history May 25 as the first private company to dock a spacecraft with the International Space Station.

Private rocket launches for space station docking

Article | May 24, 2012

The Falcon 9 rocket's engines ignited in the early-morning darkness May 22, launching a mission to send the first commercial spacecraft to rendezvous with the International Space Station.

NASA takes synthetic vision to the next level

Article | May 17, 2012

Engineers at the NASA Langley Research Center who developed synthetic vision technology are now working to put it right before your eyes. A head-worn display that tracks your gaze and is mounted on an ordinary eyeglass frame promises to project critical information, including traffic and terrain, in zero visibility.

NASA hunts meteorite with airship

Article | May 07, 2012

The remains of an asteroid similar to those that may have launched life on Earth crashed into Northern California on April 22. NASA scientist Peter Jenniskens hopes to collect footage from terrestrial security and surveillance cameras to track down missing pieces.

Many pilots play roles in next chapter of spaceflight

Article | Apr 26, 2012

A successful test of parachutes that will safely ease the Orion manned spacecraft to landing was overshadowed by the final flight of the space shuttle Discovery on April 17. In Houston, the Arizona desert, and elsewhere, Orion's test and development crew, many of them pilots, were focused on the future.

Back to a supersonic future

Article | Apr 26, 2012

When they lower the boom, we may get the word from a general aviation pilot who directs research that is blazing new trails and solving old riddles in aerodynamics.

Shuttle spotting: ‘Discovery’ lands at final home

Article | Apr 18, 2012

The space shuttle 'Discovery' appeared over the treeline atop its carrier aircraft, a modified Boeing 747, to an eruption of applause from thousands of visitors who lined the parking lot of the National Air and Space Museum Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center April 17 to witness its last flight.

NASA, SpaceX express cautious optimism for April 30 launch

Article | Apr 16, 2012

Two weeks ahead of the first planned attempt to rendezvous a commercial spacecraft with the International Space Station, all systems are go, and officials from NASA and private contractor SpaceX are keeping their fingers crossed.

Curiosity, midway to Mars, adjusts course

Article | Apr 04, 2012

The Mars rover Curiosity is back on course after NASA engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory executed a fancy bit of space aviation in late March.

NASA rockets will spread a ghostly glow

Article | Mar 08, 2012

The interaction of wind and charged electrical particles 60 to 65 miles from the surface has been associated with satellite failures and radio communication interference. NASA wants to better understand why.

Astronaut with GA roots prepares new generation of explorers

Article | Feb 27, 2012

The main engines lit six seconds before liftoff, filling the space shuttle Discovery with a low rumble. Liftoff was instant. NASA astronaut Nicole Stott's second trip to space was a highlight of a space flight career launched, in many ways, by a Skybolt.

NASA games designed to spark aviation interest

Article | Feb 01, 2012

NASA has launched two free games aimed at inspiring the next generation of engineers and aviators--an air traffic control game adapted for Apple iPhone and iPad devices, and a multi-player space and technology trivia game hosted on Facebook.

Air Mobile Joe

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2012

Ariana, born in Haiti, came to the door of the Cessna Skymaster nicknamed Ti Burik and paused; that first step is a big one for any 6-year-old. Joe Hurston, her adoptive father, lifted her from the airplane to the tarmac where she shyly stood. After meeting her 14-year-old brother, Peter, I stooped down and said, "I saw you on TV!" She looked at the ground.

Swamp Pirates

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2011

The Sikorsky X2 team is honored for speeding

Musician’s flying anthem soars

Article | Sep 01, 2011

Singer-songwriter Ansel Brown couldn't help but put his feelings into music about the family of aviators he acquired when he married Lisa Wixom Brown.