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Answers for Pilots: Hurricanes

Article | Aug 01, 2011

It's August and we're right in the middle of the Atlantic hurricane season, which officially began in June. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook predicts a 65 percent chance of an above normal season. Of course, while the weather experts can forecast probable activity, they can't predict the location of landfall until the storm track has been established, and even then, storms have been known to deviate from their projected path. So, for those aircraft owners who live on or near the Atlantic coast, the Gulf of Mexico, or the Caribbean Sea, having a hurricane plan for your aircraft is essential.

Member Guide

Article | Aug 01, 2011

2011 sweepstakes—your last chance Be sure your AOPA membership is current as of July 31, 2011, in order to be eligible to win this year’s sweepstakes airplane, a completely refurbished Cessna 182—the Crossover Classic. Increase your chances to win by enrolling in AOPA’s safe, secure, and convenient automatic annual renewal (AAR) program and you’ll receive five additional sweepstakes entries.

AOPA Action

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2011

Fuller urges: ‘Let’s rally GA’ AOPA President Craig Fuller called on general aviation pilots to rally around GA so that collectively the industry can protect our freedom to fly. Delivering a keynote address at the Northwest Aviation Conference in Puyallup, Washington, Fuller said everyone has a role to play.

Safety Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2011

In a recent Air Safety eJournal, my mostly weekly blog, I cited a study released by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety touting the benefits of red light cameras. The Washington Post noted that traffic fatalities were down 26 percent over a five-year period in D.C., significantly more than cities that didn’t employ such enforcement.

Member Guide

Article | Mar 01, 2011

ANSWERS FOR PILOTS: Tax breaks for business-use aircraft On December 17, 2010, Congress passed and President Barack Obama signed the Tax Relief, Unemployment Insurance Reauthorization, and Job Creation Act of 2010 that became the second tax bill in 2010 to extend bonus depreciation for new aircraft purchasers whose aircraft will be used at least 50 percent for business in 2011. A September bill had already extended 50-percent bonus depreciation for the 2010 tax year, and the December bill allows a 100-percent bonus depreciation for the 2011 tax year for aircraft placed in service after September 8, 2010.

Member Guide

Article | Jan 01, 2011

New year is time to check insurance coverage As another year comes to a close it’s the perfect time to review your insurance policies. A lot can happen in a year, and your coverage needs may have changed.

Member Guide

Article | Nov 01, 2010

ANSWERS FOR PILOTS Aircraft theft insurance Imagine your shock if you walked into your hangar and saw that it was empty. Your airplane was missing.

Answers for Pilots: Aircraft theft insurance

Article | Nov 01, 2010

Imagine your shock if you walked into your hangar and saw that it was empty. Your airplane was missing.

AOPA Action

Article | Oct 01, 2010

AOPA ACTION SECTIONS National Action State and Regional Action AOPA Airport Support Network AOPA Membership Products AOPA Air Safety Foundation EPA confirms: No lead ban deadline looms on avgas The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has confirmed that it has not set a deadline for the removal of lead from avgas—and that it will coordinate closely with industry stakeholders in the development of a solution to the issue. “EPA has not established or proposed any date by which lead emissions from aircraft operating on leaded avgas would need to be reduced,” wrote Margo Oge, director of the office of transportation and air quality for the EPA.

Pilot Counsel

Article | Oct 01, 2010

The legal liability of flight instructors is a legitimate concern that is continually raised. The question comes up because flight instructors are generally aware that they could be sued, not only for something that happens during the flight instruction period, but also for something that happens afterward—something that somebody could say was caused by faulty flight instruction given earlier.