Aeromedical Factors

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Minnesota Supreme Court sides with Cirrus in fatal crash

Article | Jul 20, 2012

The estate of a pilot killed with a passenger in a 2003 crash near Hill City, Minn., will not collect damages from Cirrus Aircraft, following a decision by the Minnesota Supreme Court July 18 that upheld an appellate ruling in favor of the aircraft maker. The crash resulted from spatial disorientation on a night VFR flight into IMC, according to the NTSB, and the pilot's family blamed Cirrus for failing to provide a lesson on the topic.

Fly like a Fighter: Cross-controlled in tight formation

Fly like a fighter | Mar 26, 2012

An Air Force student was doing a magnificent job of flying close formation, at night and in the weather, while cross-controlling a T-38 in a slip. When the instructor instructed him to get his right foot off the rudder, there was no response.

Never Again Online: That queasy feeling

Article | Nov 01, 2005

She was a beautiful little 1963 Piper Cherokee 180. I watched her being meticulously rebuilt by our FBO.

Never Again Online: Pilot in command

Article | Jan 01, 2004

It was early spring and I needed a 250-nm straight-line, nonstop solo flight as well as a minimum of two hours of night flight to satisfy the cross-country requirements for my commercial rating. This flight was a beautiful and uneventful 3.2-hour night flight from Van Nuys, California, to Mesquite, Nevada.

Never Again Online: Off radar in the Mojave Triangle

Article | Oct 01, 2003

When my sister suggested that I meet her in Las Vegas for her fiftieth birthday last May, I decided to fly there; it had been a year since I had flown solo to a new destination. I chose Henderson Executive Airport, 11 miles south of The Strip and under the Las Vegas Class B airspace, as my destination airport.

Hangar Talk

Article | Oct 01, 2002

"I'm one of the few lucky folks with a job that is not only my dream job, but also one that makes use of everything I've learned in the past 40 years," says author Linda D. Pendleton.