Aviation Medical Examiner

Items per page   10 | 25 | 50 | 100
31 to 40 of 108 results

Can I fly after a stroke?

Article | Jan 03, 2013

The three terms one hears when dealing with a “stroke” are cerebrovascular accident, stroke, and transient ischemic attack (TIA). In a TIA, a person has neurological symptoms lasting for several minutes up to several hours.

Answers for Pilots: Vision

Article | Jan 01, 2013

Like most aspects of our health, we take our vision for granted until something affects it. Pilots’ eyes, unfortunately, are not immune to the effects of aging. Cataracts and the ensuing surgery, and lens implants are often part of the golden years. And for all of us, even something as simple as getting new contact lenses could have an impact on airman medical certification if the lenses are tinted, bifocal, or multifocal. Find out how different vision issues impact your airman medical certification.

The ABCs of EKGs

Article | Dec 28, 2012

If you require an electrocardiogram for your aviation medical certificate, it is the AME’s responsibility to interpret the EKG and if it is abnormal to have you undergo certain testing and evaluations. Find out how to ensure the doctor does the job properly.

Diabetes mellitus on oral medications

Article | Oct 26, 2012

Diet-controlled diabetes mellitus is one of the five medical conditions that your aviation medical examiner may grant issuance if you come to your examination with the proper documentation.

Six tips to get your medical faster

Article | Oct 12, 2012

Based on our frequent interactions with the FAA's Aerospace Medical Certification Division, AOPA Director of Medical Certification Gary Crump shares six tips you can do to hasten the process of wresting your medical certificate from the FAA.

The Big C: Medical certification of prostate or breast cancer

Article | Oct 10, 2012

Dr. Warren Silberman, the former manager of FAA Aerospace Medical Certification, offers insight into how the FAA views the particular treatments for prostate and breast cancer, and what you can expect when you present medical records to the agency.

Webinar: How to Pick a 'Good' AME

Article | Sep 12, 2012

Nothing is more critical to getting your medical than having a "good" Aviation Medical Examiner. It can make the difference between an in–office issuance with no hassle or a delayed issuance with you stuck on the ground. Dr. Warren Silberman, formerly the Manager of FAA Aerospace Medical Certification from 1997-2011, will share his insights into what makes a "good" AME.

FAA requires EKG for first-class airmen, certain conditions

Article | Sep 07, 2012

The main policy where electrocardiograms (EKGs) are required is in first-class airmen. An EKG is required when a first-class airman turns age 35 and then each year after one turns age 40.