Aviation Medical Examiner

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Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2012

We watch David Letterman's Late Show and laugh at his top-10 list. Consider "stupid things pilots do to sabotage their medical." So, like Letterman, let's count backwards from the number 10.

Cleared for takeoff after joint replacement surgery

Article | Feb 07, 2012

Joint replacement surgery is commonplace now, with total knee and hip replacements being among the most frequently performed procedures. Actually, there isn’t a lot required by the FAA when you report the surgery on your next medical application.

Deaf pilot spreads the word: You can fly

Article | Jan 25, 2012

Greg Lawrence's aviation career, logging 3,000 hours over the course of nearly a half century, would be relatively unremarkable by general aviation standards, but for one thing.

MedXPress is mandatory

Article | Jan 10, 2012

Effective Oct. 1, all pilots are required to use the online medical application MedXPress to complete the FAA airman medical prior to visiting an aviation medical examiner (AME).

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2012

"N-RUDEF, for the third time, descend and maintain three thousand." Sometimes there's too much chatter; sometimes traversing the wild blue one simply misses a call. Sometimes it's something else. I often harp about protecting your health first and dealing with your flying privileges later, but when failure to hear the harp is concerned, the two are intimately entwined. Without hearing well you will not be flying well--if at all--representing a threat to yourself and others. According to the National Institutes of Health, about one-third of folks over age 65 have some hearing loss, rising to 50 percent at 75--after heart disease and arthritis, the most common physical affliction. Given the average pilot is well over age 50, I should not have to shout to get your attention. Or maybe I do.

License to learn

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2011

An FAA-designated pilot examiner once told me about the most anxious private pilot candidate he ever experienced on a checkride. Aside from sweating and mumbling during the oral exam (the applicant, not the examiner), the ultimate demonstration of in-flight nerves began when the examiner requested a steep turn.

President's Position

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2011

Every time you get behind the wheel of a car, you're making a judgment call. Are you fit to drive? Have you taken any medications that could impair your performance? Do you have a medical condition that would make you unsafe? Are you too tired to drive?

Affair of the heart

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2011

My dog Sophie helped save my medical certificate, if not my life. It wasn’t as dramatic as her running home barking out a message that I had fallen down a well.

Answers for Pilots: Arthritis

Article | Jun 01, 2011

For many pilots, as they experience an increase in one kind of mobility (traveling and wide open schedules), they also deal with a decrease of another kind of mobility (flexible knees, hips, and shoulders). Arthritis affects nearly one in five adults, according to the Arthritis Foundation, and more than half of them have not yet reached age 65.