Medications

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Documents pilots need to provide for conditions AMEs can issue

Article | Jul 05, 2013

Dr. Warren S. Silberman offers pointers on what you need to get your treating physician to provide to you prior to visiting your AME if you have glaucoma, chronic hepatitis C, hypothyroidism, or hypertension.

The FAA and depression

Article | Jun 17, 2013

Get up to speed on the FAA's policy guidelines for the use of "antidepressants" and medical certification.

The ‘list that doesn’t exist’: FAA-allowed medications

Article | May 17, 2013

The FAA does not publish an official list of medications that are considered appropriate for aviation activities. But AOPA has one.

FAA’s take on sleep medications

Article | May 13, 2013

Need a good night's sleep? Before taking medication to help you fall asleep, consider the type of medication, potential aeromedically adverse side effects, and any underlying medical condition.

Prepare a winning case

Article | Jan 14, 2013

Get insider tips from Dr. Warren Silberman, former manager of FAA Aerospace Medical Certification, on preparing your medical packet for the FAA’s review so that you can get your case approved and medical certificate in hand, sooner with less hassle.

Choosing medications and medical devices

Article | Nov 21, 2012

How does the FAA choose which medications to approve? Dr. Warren Silberman, the former manager of FAA Aerospace Medical Certification, explains.

High blood pressure disqualifying?

Article | Nov 06, 2012

Concerned about losing your medical because of high blood pressure? Don't be spooked by marketing scare tactics: More than 64,000 airmen are flying with high blood pressure on medication.

Diabetes mellitus on oral medications

Article | Oct 26, 2012

Diet-controlled diabetes mellitus is one of the five medical conditions that your aviation medical examiner may grant issuance if you come to your examination with the proper documentation.

Drugs - the legal kind

Article | Jul 31, 2012

Pilots are often asking why a given drug their regular doctor has prescribed does not appear on our list of “approved” medications. Well, here is the truth of the matter: The FAA does not give its approval of an FDA-approved medication until the drug has been available for one year. This is not an arbitrary and deliberately obstructive move on their part; the FAA wants to see how the medication reacts on the body when a large population is exposed, over and above what was established in the clinical trials mandated by that other federal giant, the Food and Drug Administration.