Special Issuance Medical

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Special issuance authorization update

Article | Aug 31, 2012

For pilots who have a special issuance authorization, if you missed the announcement this summer, you are no longer required to carry your authorization letter with you when you fly.

Flow control and gate holds: Managing kidney stones

Article | Aug 27, 2012

One of the consequences of inadequate regular hydration is an increased risk of forming kidney stones, and although there are many reasons why "renal calculi" form, one contributing factor is a lack of water in the body to dilute the mineral compounds that are by-products of the manufacture of urine. Especially in the hot, muggy summer months when we lose so much fluid content when we sweat, failure to maintain an adequate "inflow" of H2O further depletes our water reserves and, over time, a tiny grain of mineral gets a foothold and begins to form in the kidney.

Hot air balloons, the RAF, and D.I.A.B.E.T.E.S

Article | Jun 28, 2012

What do Beaumont, Miss., hot air balloons, the Royal Air Force, and diabetes have in common? Stick around and find out, all will become crystal clear! Diabetes is on the march with millions afflicted, and a couple of pilots are taking the lead in tackling this affliction.

Think like a pilot

Article | May 08, 2012

Pilots strive to minimize risk before flights, so why do some think and act differently when it comes to their health?

Five situations where your AME can make the call

Article | May 05, 2012

Did you know that there are five medical conditions that your AME doesn’t have to defer to the FAA prior to granting medical certification? That’s a fact that can make your path as an aviator easier to navigate if you develop one of these conditions.

FAA eases special issuance burden

Article | Mar 22, 2012

Starting July 20, pilots who have a medical certificate with a special issuance authorization will no longer need to carry the separate authorization letter with them in the aircraft.

Xarelto now an approved medication for flight

Article | Mar 12, 2012

Good news on the medication front: The FAA recently accepted Xarelto as an allowed anticoagulant for use in aviation.

FAA announces end of paper medical certificate applications

Advocacy | Jan 27, 2012

The good news is, medical certificate applications submitted online should be processed more efficiently, medical certification processing errors should be reduced, and taxpayers should get a break on federal spending. However, the transition away from paper applications for medical certificates presents AOPA with some concerns for pilots who don't currently use computers.

Answers for Pilots: Are you special?

Article | Oct 01, 2011

For more than 25,000 pilots, obtaining a special issuance medical certificate is the difference between flying and being grounded. The FAA created the SI authorization to provide more flexibility in granting medical certificates to pilots with serious medical conditions. There are 15 medical conditions identified in Part 67 of the Federal Aviation Regulations (the medical standards for airmen) that are disqualifying "by medical history or clinical diagnosis." The FAA doesn't limit SI authorization to these 15 conditions, however, but can extend it to include any medical condition that could progress adversely - decisions are made on a case-by-case basis. AOPA medical certification specialists can help you get through the process.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2011

This column usually addresses ways for you to help yourself. Today, while the same is true, contemporaneously it provides a way for you to benefit your fellow man.

Member Guide

Article | Oct 01, 2011

Get a sneak peek at the new AOPA holiday ornament Get into the holiday spirit early this year with the 2011 limited edition AOPA Holiday Ornament. The second in AOPA’s line of commemorative holiday ornaments features an aircraft that embodies the spirit of aviation: a beautiful 1940 Waco.

Answers for Pilots: Arthritis

Article | Jun 01, 2011

For many pilots, as they experience an increase in one kind of mobility (traveling and wide open schedules), they also deal with a decrease of another kind of mobility (flexible knees, hips, and shoulders). Arthritis affects nearly one in five adults, according to the Arthritis Foundation, and more than half of them have not yet reached age 65.

Member Guide

Article | Apr 01, 2011

ANSWERS FOR PILOTS: Webinar on buying an aircraft set for April 20 This is the time of year when many AOPA members consider purchasing an aircraft. If you are looking to buy and have questions about the purchase process, AOPA has answers for you.

Member Guide

Article | Feb 01, 2011

ANSWERS FOR PILOTS: Don’t let hypertension ground you Hypertension (high blood pressure) is a common condition for many Americans and, if not controlled, can result in your next airman medical application being deferred. FAA policy requires AMEs to defer applicants whose blood pressure exceeds 155/95.

Fly Well

Article | Dec 01, 2010

In 1949 Jerry Lewis, Tony Curtis, and Janet Leigh made a short movie titled How to Smuggle a Hernia Across the Border. Why? I have no idea.

Fly Well

Article | Nov 01, 2010

In 1949 Jerry Lewis, Tony Curtis, and Janet Leigh made a short movie titled How to Smuggle a Hernia Across the Border. Why? I have no idea.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2010

Today's article is just for the boys! Prostate cancer, the most common male malignancy and second leading cause of death, merits our attention, gentlemen. Prostate cancer develops when cells divide in meaningless and uncontrolled fashion. The biggest risk factors are being male (!), aging, and family history.

Answers for Pilots: Cheer Up!

Article | Jul 01, 2010

If you mention a life-crisis to a physician, he or she usually suggests you consider taking an antidepressant to help you cope with it. While thousands of non-pilots have found some help working through their tough times by taking prescribed antidepressants, pilots could not without invalidating their airman medical certificates, since the FAA had not (until recently) allowed the use of any antidepressants for any condition. But now, it's a different story.

DOT reports on medical information security, data-sharing

Advocacy | Jul 01, 2010

A report from the Department of Transportation's Office of Inspector General has identified 15 recommendations for improving the security of airmen's medical information and the process of identifying pilots with current medical certificates who are receiving disability pay.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2010

"Sometimes, all I need is the air that I breathe and to love you," sang The Hollies in 1972. Nice sentiments, but wrong. You need air - not sometimes, all of the time. Many pilots scuba dive, always descending with a carefully checked tank, but many ascend without oxygen. Federal Aviation Regulation 91.211 states that a pilot of an unpressurized aircraft shall not operate from 12,500 to 14,000 feet for longer than 30 minutes without supplemental oxygen. Above 14,000 feet, oxygen has to be used by the crew, and above 15,000 feet it must be provided for everyone aboard.

Member Guide

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2010

Answers For Pilots: Certain antidepressants are now FAA-allowed Most of us who’ve lived awhile have gone through some turbulent times—relationships gone sour, a loved one’s illness or death, or a really bad financial break. We get knocked down, shake it off, and get up to carry on, again.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2010

"Sometimes, all I need is the air that I breathe and to love you," sang The Hollies in 1972. Nice sentiments, but wrong. You need air - not sometimes, all of the time. Many pilots scuba dive, always descending with a carefully checked tank, but many ascend without oxygen. Federal Aviation Regulation 91.211 states that a pilot of an unpressurized aircraft shall not operate from 12,500 to 14,000 feet for longer than 30 minutes without supplemental oxygen. Above 14,000 feet, oxygen has to be used by the crew, and above 15,000 feet it must be provided for everyone aboard.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2010

"Sometimes, all I need is the air that I breathe and to love you," sang The Hollies in 1972. Nice sentiments, but wrong. You need air - not sometimes, all of the time. Many pilots scuba dive, always descending with a carefully checked tank, but many ascend without oxygen. Federal Aviation Regulation 91.211 states that a pilot of an unpressurized aircraft shall not operate from 12,500 to 14,000 feet for longer than 30 minutes without supplemental oxygen. Above 14,000 feet, oxygen has to be used by the crew, and above 15,000 feet it must be provided for everyone aboard.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2010

“The heart is the only broken instrument that works,” said T.E. Kalem, former writer for Time magazine, and on Valentine’s Day, surrounded by images of love, we tend to focus on the emotional side of our biological fuel pump.