Special Issuance Medical

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Xarelto now an approved medication for flight

Article | Mar 12, 2012

Good news on the medication front: The FAA recently accepted Xarelto as an allowed anticoagulant for use in aviation.

FAA announces end of paper medical certificate applications

Advocacy | Jan 27, 2012

The good news is, medical certificate applications submitted online should be processed more efficiently, medical certification processing errors should be reduced, and taxpayers should get a break on federal spending. However, the transition away from paper applications for medical certificates presents AOPA with some concerns for pilots who don't currently use computers.

Answers for Pilots: Are you special?

Article | Oct 01, 2011

For more than 25,000 pilots, obtaining a special issuance medical certificate is the difference between flying and being grounded. The FAA created the SI authorization to provide more flexibility in granting medical certificates to pilots with serious medical conditions. There are 15 medical conditions identified in Part 67 of the Federal Aviation Regulations (the medical standards for airmen) that are disqualifying "by medical history or clinical diagnosis." The FAA doesn't limit SI authorization to these 15 conditions, however, but can extend it to include any medical condition that could progress adversely - decisions are made on a case-by-case basis. AOPA medical certification specialists can help you get through the process.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2011

This column usually addresses ways for you to help yourself. Today, while the same is true, contemporaneously it provides a way for you to benefit your fellow man.

Member Guide

Article | Oct 01, 2011

Get a sneak peek at the new AOPA holiday ornament Get into the holiday spirit early this year with the 2011 limited edition AOPA Holiday Ornament. The second in AOPA’s line of commemorative holiday ornaments features an aircraft that embodies the spirit of aviation: a beautiful 1940 Waco.

Answers for Pilots: Arthritis

Article | Jun 01, 2011

For many pilots, as they experience an increase in one kind of mobility (traveling and wide open schedules), they also deal with a decrease of another kind of mobility (flexible knees, hips, and shoulders). Arthritis affects nearly one in five adults, according to the Arthritis Foundation, and more than half of them have not yet reached age 65.

Member Guide

Article | Apr 01, 2011

ANSWERS FOR PILOTS: Webinar on buying an aircraft set for April 20 This is the time of year when many AOPA members consider purchasing an aircraft. If you are looking to buy and have questions about the purchase process, AOPA has answers for you.

Member Guide

Article | Feb 01, 2011

ANSWERS FOR PILOTS: Don’t let hypertension ground you Hypertension (high blood pressure) is a common condition for many Americans and, if not controlled, can result in your next airman medical application being deferred. FAA policy requires AMEs to defer applicants whose blood pressure exceeds 155/95.

Fly Well

Article | Dec 01, 2010

In 1949 Jerry Lewis, Tony Curtis, and Janet Leigh made a short movie titled How to Smuggle a Hernia Across the Border. Why? I have no idea.

Fly Well

Article | Nov 01, 2010

In 1949 Jerry Lewis, Tony Curtis, and Janet Leigh made a short movie titled How to Smuggle a Hernia Across the Border. Why? I have no idea.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2010

Today's article is just for the boys! Prostate cancer, the most common male malignancy and second leading cause of death, merits our attention, gentlemen. Prostate cancer develops when cells divide in meaningless and uncontrolled fashion. The biggest risk factors are being male (!), aging, and family history.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2010

"Sometimes, all I need is the air that I breathe and to love you," sang The Hollies in 1972. Nice sentiments, but wrong. You need air - not sometimes, all of the time. Many pilots scuba dive, always descending with a carefully checked tank, but many ascend without oxygen. Federal Aviation Regulation 91.211 states that a pilot of an unpressurized aircraft shall not operate from 12,500 to 14,000 feet for longer than 30 minutes without supplemental oxygen. Above 14,000 feet, oxygen has to be used by the crew, and above 15,000 feet it must be provided for everyone aboard.

Member Guide

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2010

Answers For Pilots: Certain antidepressants are now FAA-allowed Most of us who’ve lived awhile have gone through some turbulent times—relationships gone sour, a loved one’s illness or death, or a really bad financial break. We get knocked down, shake it off, and get up to carry on, again.

DOT reports on medical information security, data-sharing

Advocacy | Jul 01, 2010

A report from the Department of Transportation's Office of Inspector General has identified 15 recommendations for improving the security of airmen's medical information and the process of identifying pilots with current medical certificates who are receiving disability pay.

Answers for Pilots: Cheer Up!

Article | Jul 01, 2010

If you mention a life-crisis to a physician, he or she usually suggests you consider taking an antidepressant to help you cope with it. While thousands of non-pilots have found some help working through their tough times by taking prescribed antidepressants, pilots could not without invalidating their airman medical certificates, since the FAA had not (until recently) allowed the use of any antidepressants for any condition. But now, it's a different story.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2010

"Sometimes, all I need is the air that I breathe and to love you," sang The Hollies in 1972. Nice sentiments, but wrong. You need air - not sometimes, all of the time. Many pilots scuba dive, always descending with a carefully checked tank, but many ascend without oxygen. Federal Aviation Regulation 91.211 states that a pilot of an unpressurized aircraft shall not operate from 12,500 to 14,000 feet for longer than 30 minutes without supplemental oxygen. Above 14,000 feet, oxygen has to be used by the crew, and above 15,000 feet it must be provided for everyone aboard.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2010

"Sometimes, all I need is the air that I breathe and to love you," sang The Hollies in 1972. Nice sentiments, but wrong. You need air - not sometimes, all of the time. Many pilots scuba dive, always descending with a carefully checked tank, but many ascend without oxygen. Federal Aviation Regulation 91.211 states that a pilot of an unpressurized aircraft shall not operate from 12,500 to 14,000 feet for longer than 30 minutes without supplemental oxygen. Above 14,000 feet, oxygen has to be used by the crew, and above 15,000 feet it must be provided for everyone aboard.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2010

“The heart is the only broken instrument that works,” said T.E. Kalem, former writer for Time magazine, and on Valentine’s Day, surrounded by images of love, we tend to focus on the emotional side of our biological fuel pump.

AOPA Action

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2009

AOPA, EAA formalize collaborative efforts With the letters “EAA” emblazoned by a skywriter across a crisp blue Wisconsin sky, the presidents of the world’s two largest aviation associations signed a memorandum of understanding that harnesses the power of the two organizations to bring about improvements to general aviation. Under the agreement, EAA and AOPA pledged to support each other’s efforts to promote, protect, and expand the general aviation community.

Answers for Pilots: Healthier Choices

Article | Jul 01, 2009

AOPA Air Safety Foundation’s 2008 Nall Report, which details general aviation accidents, trends, and factors for 2007, states that pilot-related accidents accounted for about three-quarters of both total and fatal general aviation accidents in 2007. Each of the pilots involved in these accidents made a decision, or a series of decisions, that culminated in an accident.

The doctor is in

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2009

The shrill sound of the pager pierced the quiet moment of early morning solitude in the office as I attempted to catch up on the necessities of being a flight physician. Reviewing the list of return phone calls to make, studying the upcoming patient visits, and signing electronic medical notes was being interrupted again.

Answers for Pilots: Grandfathered in under 40

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2008

The technical specialists in AOPA’s medical department spend much of their time talking with older members who fly on special issuance medical certificates. But with the FAA’s recent extension of the duration of medical certificates for pilots under age 40, we’ve heard from many members who have not yet had their fortieth birthday and have questions on how the changes apply to them.

Letters

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2008

Medically speaking: A second chance I read the article about Skip Monaghan Jr. obtaining his medical back after his heart transplant (“Medically Speaking: A Second Chance,” August AOPA Pilot).

President's Position: The airman medical

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2008

AOPA President Phil Boyer became a private pilot in 1967. What’s the most under-utilized resource AOPA offers its members? Without a doubt, it’s our medical certification services.

Medically Speaking: Never Give Up

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2008

You sit there in the examining room, blinking your eyes in disbelief at what the doctor in the white coat just told you—even as the words reverberate in your ears. “I’m afraid that you do not meet the requirements for a third class medical certificate.” For many pilots, the aviation medical examiner’s words come as a surprise.