AOPA Pilot Magazine

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June 1998 Volume 44 / Number 6

Katana DA20-C1
Cover Story | June 1998

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Featured

Pilot Magazine

A Winged Sport/Utility Vehicle

The airplanes we own say more about us than we'd probably like to admit. Some owners choose airplanes that allow them to fly close to the earth — aerial pick-up trucks with big engines and little tailwheels, caked with mud; others must own the latest low-profile, high-flying plastic airplane with fine Corinthian leather and a glass instrument panel.

Jun 01, 1998

Pilot Magazine

Realizing the Dream

As pilots, we have much more in common than simply the ability to safely maneuver an airplane from takeoff to landing. For the most part, we also share a passion for this avocation or vocation called flying.

Jun 01, 1998

Pilot Magazine

Instrument Insights Part 6 of 12

How to focus more attention on the procedure and less on the airplane Nonprecision approaches can result in an accumulation of errors if not flown precisely. Descent planning alone can double a pilot's work load.

Jun 01, 1998

Pilot Magazine

Diamond Katana

Diamond's decidedly Euro trainer gets an American accent Appearances are deceiving. In the world of automobile design, for example, it's common to introduce a supposedly fresh model that is really a new body atop the old platform — giving what seems to be a clean-sheet design that in fact shares engine, suspension, and other major components with the outgoing version.

Jun 01, 1998

Pilot Magazine

GA at the Movies

The venerable de Havilland Beaver flies low over the brilliant blue and green waters, hugging the rugged coast of Kauai, Hawaii, the old radial's throaty rumble in stark contrast to the beautifully tranquil and lush landscape viewed out the right side. As we fly around a point of land jutting into the ocean, a short landing strip comes into view over the nose and the pilot points to it, indicating that we'll land there.

Jun 01, 1998

Pilot Magazine

Never Again

It was a typical Florida day in the middle of June, and the weather looked as if we could make the return trip from Miami's Opa Locka Airport to North Philadelphia Airport. I planned a short stop en route to stretch our legs and get a small lunch — no sweat, I thought.

Jun 01, 1998

Pilot Magazine

Wx Watch: Convective Calamaties

For the time being, let's do away with any deep theoretical discussions concerning thunderstorms. Besides, we should all know by now that thunderstorms are caused by moist, unstable air rising under the influence of frontal, terrain, or upper-air lifting forces.

Jun 01, 1998

Commentary

Pilot Magazine

Landmark Accidents: Cleared for the Approach

Controlled flight into terrain, or CFIT, in instrument conditions is a leading cause of accidents for both the airlines and general aviation. By definition, the pilot believes the flight not to be in jeopardy or has an uneasy feeling that something is not right — but is not successful in resolving it before the impact.

Jun 01, 1998

Pilot Magazine

Letters

Mnemonics I enjoyed Phil Scott's article on mnemonics ("Head Work," April Pilot). As I am down to my last half-gram of brain tissue and can never remember where I put the checklists, mnemonics are a necessary feature of flying.

Jun 01, 1998

Pilot Magazine

Pilotage

Lately I fancy myself flying a fast transportation airplane, able to leap large states in a single leg. But that need for speed is causing something of a psychic backlash.

Jun 01, 1998

Pilot Magazine

President's Position

It was not until 1991, when I became AOPA's third president, that the notion of using a general aviation airplane as a vital business tool became a reality for me. As a longtime member of AOPA I never was aware that the association owned and often used a GA aircraft to travel throughout the United States.

Jun 01, 1998

Pilot Magazine

Proficient Pilot

The most likely time for an airline pilot to buy an airplane seems to be in the vicinity of his sixtieth birthday. This is when the FAA dictates that his life as an air-carrier pilot will come to an abrupt and ignominious end.

Jun 01, 1998

Pilot Magazine

Waypoints

The plan was simple enough: Get home. We had all day to do it if necessary — complete flexibility.

Jun 01, 1998

Departments

Pilot Magazine

AOPA Access

Many aviation issues are time sensitive: an emergency airworthiness directive here, an airspace conflict there, or that upcoming annual inspection. One constant that comes around at least every three years for those of us flying powered aircraft is the medical certificate renewal.

Jun 01, 1998

Pilot Magazine

AOPA Action

Short-Term Defeat of User Fees, But Bill Creates Two-Headed Monster The Clinton administration's FAA Air Traffic Services Improvement Act, introduced on April 20, would split the FAA into two organizations, each managed by the Department of Transportation. "The administration's proposal would send air traffic control in the wrong direction," said AOPA President Phil Boyer.

Jun 01, 1998

Pilot Magazine

Pilot Briefing

Ground broken for Tiger plant Like other cats, the Tiger apparently has nine lives. TLM Aerospace, a new company financed by Tong Lung Metal Industries, plans to put the sporty four-place Tiger back into production.

Jun 01, 1998

Pilot Magazine

Pilot Counsel

Here is an FAA enforcement case that suggests to us lessons to be learned about maintaining our pilot logbooks. For one thing, it shows us how strictly the FAA can construe the regulations requiring logbook entries.

Jun 01, 1998

Pilot Magazine

Pilots

The axiom is that beer and flying don't mix. No question, end of story.

Jun 01, 1998

Pilot Magazine

Pilot Products

Avidyne Flight Computer Avidyne hopes to make a believer out of everybody who questions the value of a multifunction computer (MFC) in the cockpit. The company is new but holds a potential powerful enough to make even skeptics stand up and take notice.

Jun 01, 1998

Pilot Magazine

Test Pilot

GENERAL Modern and sophisticated aircraft simulators have six freedoms of motion. Can you name them? What is the quaint word used by British pilots when referring to an airplane's control stick? What is the only state in the United States that does not have a border consisting of or containing either a straight line or an arc? Why do many airplanes have pull-type circuit breakers, while many others have flush-type circuit breakers? Orville Wright was the first man to solo an airplane, but who was the first woman? One of the most famous operations in the history of the U.S.

Jun 01, 1998

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