Pilot Magazine January 2012

Pilot Magazine Cover January 2012

January 2012 Volume 55 / Number 1

Pitts Special: No bad attitudes
Cover Story | January 2012

 

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Feature

Pilot Magazine

Safety Pilot

Aging Gracefully, Flying Safely is the name of the new Air Safety Institute online course that looks at how we fly as we age (www.airsafety institute.org/aging). It’s no secret that the average age of pilots has been climbing as inexorably as the national debt. While AOPA and other GA groups, such as EAA, are working to bring new and younger pilots into the fold, many of us have been flying for decades and would like to continue. But the safety statistics are not always kind.

Jan 01, 2012

Pilot Magazine

At your fingertips

Other than fuel and oil, there are perhaps no two things more indispensable to aviation these days than AOPA Pilot and the iPad. And now, they are together in a new way thanks to the new AOPA Mags app.

Jan 01, 2012

Pilot Magazine

Avionics: No mandate for ADS-B "In"

The FAA's rules for ADS-B "Out," the transponder-like signals that identify each aircraft in the satellite-based system, are set in stone.

Jan 01, 2012

Pilot Magazine

AOPA Media

A single FBO offers all this: aerial tours of the Grand Canyon; a chance to shoot down an aerial foe in mock combat using world-class Extra 330LT aerobatic aircraft; a flight school; and aircraft maintenance. View the video for more excitement than a casino.

Jan 01, 2012

Pilot Magazine

Dogfight | The perfect trainer

What's the best primary trainer? That's easy--it's a Cessna 150 or 152. This series of airplanes has proven its worth as trainers for decades, having churned out a huge chunk of the general aviation pilot population. In the glory days of the 1960s and 1970s, Cessna's Pilot Centers built a hugely successful training program around the Cessna 150. Why is that, you ask?

Jan 01, 2012

Commentary

Pilot Magazine

Pilot Briefing

How a hot air balloon looks from above and photographed from a Piper Super Cub. A hobby becomes a sideline Dave Tunge is, at age 66, moving into the “do what I want to do” portion of his life.

Jan 01, 2012

Pilot Magazine

Pilot Counsel:

The airspace in which we fly is finite. There will be no more. So what we have needs preserving. The FAA is charged

Jan 01, 2012

Pilot Magazine

Fly Well

"N-RUDEF, for the third time, descend and maintain three thousand." Sometimes there's too much chatter; sometimes traversing the wild blue one simply misses a call. Sometimes it's something else. I often harp about protecting your health first and dealing with your flying privileges later, but when failure to hear the harp is concerned, the two are intimately entwined. Without hearing well you will not be flying well--if at all--representing a threat to yourself and others. According to the National Institutes of Health, about one-third of folks over age 65 have some hearing loss, rising to 50 percent at 75--after heart disease and arthritis, the most common physical affliction. Given the average pilot is well over age 50, I should not have to shout to get your attention. Or maybe I do.

Jan 01, 2012

Pilot Magazine

Hangar Talk

The Pitts Special, like its free-thinking, self-educated designer, Curtis Pitts, is an American original. The iconic biplane epitomizes the independent, resourceful, and outlandish nature of its creator—and its uncompromising, exhilarating,and totally impractical design exudes raw energy and attitude.

Jan 01, 2012

Pilot Magazine

Letters

I am in complete support for the continued use of NDBs and NDB approaches ("Dogfight: NDB Approaches," November 2011 AOPA Pilot). If I am flying to Canada or the Caribbean, I feel much more comfortable if I have to fall back to tracking

Jan 01, 2012

Department

Pilot Magazine

AOPA Action

Responding to member concerns, AOPA and the Experimental Aircraft Association will request an exemption that would allow many pilots flying the most common single-engine aircraft recreationally to use a driver's license and self-certification medical standard.

Jan 01, 2012

Pilot Magazine

Member Guide

About 8 percent of men and one-half percent of women in the United States have problems with color perception. Whether caused by genetics, injury, or disease, color blindness is challenging to live with and presents special hurdles for pilots. The medical standards in FAR Part 67 specify that applicants for all classes of medical certification must have "the ability to perceive those colors necessary for the safe performance of airman duties." Every visit to an AME for renewal of an airman medical certificate involves taking a color vision test. Technically known as a pseudoisochromatic color plate test, it's the one with the pages of different-colored dots.

Jan 01, 2012

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