Pilot Magazine January 2012

Pilot Magazine Cover January 2012

January 2012 Volume 55 / Number 1

Pitts Special: No bad attitudes
Cover Story | January 2012

 

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Feature

Pilot Magazine

Technique: Don’t just shut up...and die

Recently, I read an article by a pilot who had to cage an engine on a twin--a very real emergency. He was IFR, in weather, and talking with a controller. He advised the controller that he'd shut down an engine and was diverting to a suitable airport. The controller asked whether he was declaring an emergency. The pilot said, "No."

Jan 01, 2012

Pilot Magazine

Safety Pilot

Aging Gracefully, Flying Safely is the name of the new Air Safety Institute online course that looks at how we fly as we age (www.airsafety institute.org/aging). It’s no secret that the average age of pilots has been climbing as inexorably as the national debt. While AOPA and other GA groups, such as EAA, are working to bring new and younger pilots into the fold, many of us have been flying for decades and would like to continue. But the safety statistics are not always kind.

Jan 01, 2012

Pilot Magazine

Avionics: No mandate for ADS-B "In"

The FAA's rules for ADS-B "Out," the transponder-like signals that identify each aircraft in the satellite-based system, are set in stone.

Jan 01, 2012

Pilot Magazine

Swearingen SX300: Serious fun

We are level at 10,000 feet on an IFR clearance to Tulsa, Oklahoma, when we get the call from ATC: "Experimental Niner-Echo-Echo, say type aircraft."

Jan 01, 2012

Pilot Magazine

AOPA Media

A single FBO offers all this: aerial tours of the Grand Canyon; a chance to shoot down an aerial foe in mock combat using world-class Extra 330LT aerobatic aircraft; a flight school; and aircraft maintenance. View the video for more excitement than a casino.

Jan 01, 2012

Commentary

Pilot Magazine

Hangar Talk

The Pitts Special, like its free-thinking, self-educated designer, Curtis Pitts, is an American original. The iconic biplane epitomizes the independent, resourceful, and outlandish nature of its creator—and its uncompromising, exhilarating,and totally impractical design exudes raw energy and attitude.

Jan 01, 2012

Pilot Magazine

Pilots:

More than 10 years ago, JJ Quinn wanted to expand the number of aircraft at the small general aviation airport in Culpeper, Virginia. His idea was like the Fields of Dreams movie--if he built hangars, the airplanes would come.

Jan 01, 2012

Pilot Magazine

License to learn

Reasonable people can disagree about how to fly an instrument approach, with both sides of the argument having some merit. This applies to a discussion I had with an experienced instrument flight instructor about how to descend to the minimum descent altitude (MDA) on a nonprecision instrument approach. We disagreed over two approaches to approaches. The constant airspeed technique (my recommendation) has a pilot making a descent to the MDA, leveling off, and flying to the missed approach point (MAP). If the pilot has the required visibility and identifiable runway environment, he descends and lands, but only after reaching the visual descent point (VDP).

Jan 01, 2012

Pilot Magazine

Fly Well

"N-RUDEF, for the third time, descend and maintain three thousand." Sometimes there's too much chatter; sometimes traversing the wild blue one simply misses a call. Sometimes it's something else. I often harp about protecting your health first and dealing with your flying privileges later, but when failure to hear the harp is concerned, the two are intimately entwined. Without hearing well you will not be flying well--if at all--representing a threat to yourself and others. According to the National Institutes of Health, about one-third of folks over age 65 have some hearing loss, rising to 50 percent at 75--after heart disease and arthritis, the most common physical affliction. Given the average pilot is well over age 50, I should not have to shout to get your attention. Or maybe I do.

Jan 01, 2012

Pilot Magazine

President's Position

This is an important moment--the kind that comes around only every four years. We, the people, get to express ourselves concerning the fate of one-third of the the U.S. Senate, all 435 members of the House of Representatives, and the president of the United States.

Jan 01, 2012

Department

Pilot Magazine

Member Guide

About 8 percent of men and one-half percent of women in the United States have problems with color perception. Whether caused by genetics, injury, or disease, color blindness is challenging to live with and presents special hurdles for pilots. The medical standards in FAR Part 67 specify that applicants for all classes of medical certification must have "the ability to perceive those colors necessary for the safe performance of airman duties." Every visit to an AME for renewal of an airman medical certificate involves taking a color vision test. Technically known as a pseudoisochromatic color plate test, it's the one with the pages of different-colored dots.

Jan 01, 2012

Pilot Magazine

AOPA Action

Responding to member concerns, AOPA and the Experimental Aircraft Association will request an exemption that would allow many pilots flying the most common single-engine aircraft recreationally to use a driver's license and self-certification medical standard.

Jan 01, 2012

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