Fly Well

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Fly Well: Is your wiring firing correctly?

Pilot Magazine | Aug 05, 2014

Don’t blow a fuse from overload; let’s explore a few common and interesting human wiring issues.

Fly Well: Sneezing and wheezing

Pilot Magazine | Jun 04, 2014

The word allergy means “different action” and was coined by Dr. Clemens von Pirquet in 1905.

Fly Well: Changing face of aeromedicine

Pilot Magazine | May 12, 2014

Dr. Warren Silberman managed the FAA medical certification division from 1997 through 2011.

Fly Well: Check your undercarriage

Pilot Magazine | Feb 12, 2014

“T” is frequently paired with the word “level” and the phrase “should I take some?”

Fly Well: Drug wars

Pilot Magazine | Dec 19, 2013

Shooting approaches at Brown Field Municipal Airport (SDM) in San Diego, California, just north of the Mexican border, might include interesting liaisons...

Fly Well: Fifty ways to lose your blubber

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2013

Weird Al Yankovic parodied two Michael Jackson songs; Beat It became Eat It, celebrating copious consumption, while Bad morphed into Fat, mirroring what is happening in America—our mutation into a fat nation.

Fly Well: Insure, insure, insure…

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2013

The number-one cause of bankruptcies? Massive medical expenses—so dodging disease makes sense.

Topics Veterans, Pilots

Fly Well: Oh, my aching head

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2013

Aircraft maintenance bills cause headaches and paperwork is a pain in the neck, agreed?

Fly Well: Hip to be hip

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2013

“That which does not kill us makes us stronger,” stated Friedrich Nietzsche. And the reverse is true—making oneself stronger reduces the chance of a premature journey across the river Styx.

Fly Well: Playing the numbers

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2013

Eight: Hours, bottle to throttle. Eighteen: Army recruitment age; constitutional amendment initiating prohibition. Twenty-one: Legal drinking age; constitutional amendment overturning prohibition. Summer is here, and barbecues and beer beckon, so let’s consider a substance capable of causing headaches—alcohol.

Fly Well: The grim reaper versus $49

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2013

What will likely kill you? Heart disease--the most common cause of death in America. "But I eat well, exercise, and don't smoke, so I'm OK, right?" That ain't necessarily so.

Fly Well: Avgas or Jet A?

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2013

Sane pilots ensure the Cessna 172 they are about to fly has been fueled with 100LL. Why don't we treat what we eat with equal attention?

Fly Well: A clear picture

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2013

Imagine a thunderous waterfall blocking a cave entrance—clear water turned white by circumstance. This is appropriate imagery for cataract (Latin cataracta, “to dash down”).

Fly Well: Clip well, clean well

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2013

Stick and rudder, fingers and toes

Fly Well: Avoid crud

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2013

Tires, grist, and exhaust pipes

Fly Well: Who pays the Piper?

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2012

How you can celebrate your seventy-fifth anniversary.

Fly Well: Fighting the flu

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2012

Don't fly until it's through.

Fly Well: Practice good strokes

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2012

Stroking a cat soothes him and you, stroking egos beguiles, and doing the breast stroke in the pool exhilarates. And that’s about it for good strokes.

Fly Well: Memory loss

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2012

At 11:30 a.m. in Potomac Park, Washington, D.C., on May 14, 1918, President Wilson, amid large crowds, waited for the Curtis Jenny engine to start for the inaugural airmail flight.

Fly Well: You need a drink

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2012

Sigmund Freud said, “The mind is like an iceberg, it floats with one-seventh of its bulk above water.” However, without sufficient water the mind may not be doing much of anything. Always staying well hydrated is important to ensure the body is firing on all cylinders; this is even more critical when airborne.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2012

Actor Maurice Chevalier said old age is not too bad, considering the alternative—but might increasing years diminish time aloft? Can we mitigate aging’s impact? Or reach skyward when the candles cost more than the cake? These are issues worth exploring, as 25 percent of U.S. pilots holding a valid medical are older than 50.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2012

One translation of the book of Daniel, 12:4 states: "Many will travel everywhere, and knowledge will grow." As pilots we certainly travel and, in aviation, as in medicine, knowledge grows. But knowledge and data are different, and separating the two is critical.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2012

We watch David Letterman's Late Show and laugh at his top-10 list. Consider "stupid things pilots do to sabotage their medical." So, like Letterman, let's count backwards from the number 10.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2012

For many, "England" and "fantastic food" should never appear in the same sentence. As a native, I dispute this egregious mischaracterization—there's darn good nosh to be had in the land of my birth. Granted, steak and kidney pie isn't to everyone's liking, but I am a fan and encourage you to sample this delicacy. It tastes great and will provide new respect for humble kidneys, whether wrapped in pastry or not. As more than 10 percent of Americans harbor kidney disease, please read on about this crafty killer.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2012

Who didn't love Superman and his alter ego, Clark Kent? Flying was my favorite superpower, followed by X-ray vision, depicted by laser beams shooting out of Superman's eyes. If you cannot see Lois Lane in peril from a hundred yards without spectacles and want to explore options, pop into an alley, pull your undies over your trousers, and zoom off to see an ophthalmic surgeon to consider laser eye correction. With advertisements proclaiming, "Perfect vision or your cash back." I thought it time to shed light on the therapy.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2012

"N-RUDEF, for the third time, descend and maintain three thousand." Sometimes there's too much chatter; sometimes traversing the wild blue one simply misses a call. Sometimes it's something else. I often harp about protecting your health first and dealing with your flying privileges later, but when failure to hear the harp is concerned, the two are intimately entwined. Without hearing well you will not be flying well--if at all--representing a threat to yourself and others. According to the National Institutes of Health, about one-third of folks over age 65 have some hearing loss, rising to 50 percent at 75--after heart disease and arthritis, the most common physical affliction. Given the average pilot is well over age 50, I should not have to shout to get your attention. Or maybe I do.

Fly Well

Article | Dec 01, 2011

To die, to sleep; To sleep, perchance to dream -- ay, there's the rub: For in that sleep of death what dreams may come? Having learned that his uncle had murdered his father and then married mum, Hamlet loses it and contemplates suicide, but fears dreams in death may trump those during his disturbed conventional slumber. Maybe the Prince of Denmark had obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)?

Topics Airspace

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2011

Sleep tight…and don’t let the bedbugs bite! This old expression is said to originate from the use of ropes to support a mattress; if tight, sound repose ensued. Regardless, nobody wants bedbugs to bite. Pilots travel frequently so hotels feature prominently in our lives and bedbugs are an escalating problem. For once, as author of this column I don't just have sympathy, I have empathy; after a New York hotel layover, I was bitten by the bug. Actually, lots of bugs.

Topics Pilots

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2011

This column usually addresses ways for you to help yourself. Today, while the same is true, contemporaneously it provides a way for you to benefit your fellow man.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2011

"Mythical female warriors who excised their right breast to better draw a bow." In Greek, mazos means breast and "a" suffix equals "to be without." Although Amazons were probably Scythian, are not artistically depicted breastless, and the name derives from another source (ha-mazan "fighting together" or "manless") the former definition resonates with the dreaded word mastectomy. Willingly removing a breast inspires the question, "How can one avoid removing a breast?" By avoiding breast cancer.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2011

"The highest level attainable" is one definition of the word "summit." For pilots, Summit is the pinnacle of aviation information, a concise and collegial meeting, to be held in Hartford, Connecticut, September 22 through 24. In Mark Twain's 1899 classic story, "A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court," character Hank Morgan suffers a blow to the head and is inexplicably transported to medieval England, the land of my birth, to Camelot. In September, hopefully without brain trauma, the reverse will happen and this native Brit will come to the new Camelot, AOPA Summit, to participate in awe-inspiring events.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2011

"The highest level attainable" is one definition of the word "summit." For pilots, Summit is the pinnacle of aviation information, a concise and collegial meeting, to be held in Hartford, Connecticut, September 22 through 24. In Mark Twain's 1899 classic story, "A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court," character Hank Morgan suffers a blow to the head and is inexplicably transported to medieval England, the land of my birth, to Camelot. In September, hopefully without brain trauma, the reverse will happen and this native Brit will come to the new Camelot, AOPA Summit, to participate in awe-inspiring events.

Topics AOPA, Events

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2011

"The highest level attainable" is one definition of the word "summit." For pilots, Summit is the pinnacle of aviation information, a concise and collegial meeting, to be held in Hartford, Connecticut, September 22 through 24. In Mark Twain's 1899 classic story, "A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court," character Hank Morgan suffers a blow to the head and is inexplicably transported to medieval England, the land of my birth, to Camelot. In September, hopefully without brain trauma, the reverse will happen and this native Brit will come to the new Camelot, AOPA Summit, to participate in awe-inspiring events.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2011

All of us were shocked and saddened to see the awful loss of life and widespread destruction from Japan’s earthquake, tsunami, and the ensuing nuclear reactor issues. Email correspondence from pilots en route when disaster struck described critical decision-making when destination airports were closed and no alternative seemed possible, illustrating the wide-ranging effects such natural disasters may have.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2011

Youth have no idea what a vinyl record is, so “sounding like a broken record” means nothing to them. Spinning those discs with friends—happy memories, but broken discs? Mine came coaching kids’ soccer.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2011

You might experience heartburn when, during aircraft maintenance, you are told, “The left sprogulator needs replacing; it will cost a gazillion dollars [a real number, my son assures me] and we’re out of stock for six months.” But there’s another kind of heartburn. Heartburn is often a manifestation of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) when stomach contents wash up into your gullet or mouth.

Fly Well

Article | Feb 01, 2011

How to reach cloud nine? Fly frequently, safely, basking in the glow of recognition of the higher life form you truly are—pilot. The phrase “cloud nine” is of questionable origin, but because I enjoy Bill Bryson’s writing, I’m going with his explanation: In 1806 an English pharmacist named Luke Howard developed the cloud classification that is still used today.

Fly Well

Product Brief | Jan 01, 2011

A rolling stone gathers no moss. Fast-moving stuff doesn’t get gunky; think engine oil or a swiftly moving stream.

Fly Well

Article | Dec 01, 2010

In 1949 Jerry Lewis, Tony Curtis, and Janet Leigh made a short movie titled How to Smuggle a Hernia Across the Border. Why? I have no idea.

Fly Well

Article | Nov 01, 2010

In 1949 Jerry Lewis, Tony Curtis, and Janet Leigh made a short movie titled How to Smuggle a Hernia Across the Border. Why? I have no idea.

Fly Well

Article | Oct 01, 2010

October. Falling leaves, crackling fires, perfect flying weather, and healthy lung month.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2010

Today's article is just for the boys! Prostate cancer, the most common male malignancy and second leading cause of death, merits our attention, gentlemen. Prostate cancer develops when cells divide in meaningless and uncontrolled fashion. The biggest risk factors are being male (!), aging, and family history.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2010

Today's article is just for the boys! Prostate cancer, the most common male malignancy and second leading cause of death, merits our attention, gentlemen. Prostate cancer develops when cells divide in meaningless and uncontrolled fashion. The biggest risk factors are being male (!), aging, and family history.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2010

"Sometimes, all I need is the air that I breathe and to love you," sang The Hollies in 1972. Nice sentiments, but wrong. You need air - not sometimes, all of the time. Many pilots scuba dive, always descending with a carefully checked tank, but many ascend without oxygen. Federal Aviation Regulation 91.211 states that a pilot of an unpressurized aircraft shall not operate from 12,500 to 14,000 feet for longer than 30 minutes without supplemental oxygen. Above 14,000 feet, oxygen has to be used by the crew, and above 15,000 feet it must be provided for everyone aboard.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2010

"Sometimes, all I need is the air that I breathe and to love you," sang The Hollies in 1972. Nice sentiments, but wrong. You need air - not sometimes, all of the time. Many pilots scuba dive, always descending with a carefully checked tank, but many ascend without oxygen. Federal Aviation Regulation 91.211 states that a pilot of an unpressurized aircraft shall not operate from 12,500 to 14,000 feet for longer than 30 minutes without supplemental oxygen. Above 14,000 feet, oxygen has to be used by the crew, and above 15,000 feet it must be provided for everyone aboard.

AOPA Action

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2010

FAA plan charts modernization through 2018 The FAA recently released its updated implementation plan for the transition to a modernized air transportation system. The plan outlines how the agency will act on recommendations from the industry and continue to expand satellite-based navigation and surveillance.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2010

"Sometimes, all I need is the air that I breathe and to love you," sang The Hollies in 1972. Nice sentiments, but wrong. You need air - not sometimes, all of the time. Many pilots scuba dive, always descending with a carefully checked tank, but many ascend without oxygen. Federal Aviation Regulation 91.211 states that a pilot of an unpressurized aircraft shall not operate from 12,500 to 14,000 feet for longer than 30 minutes without supplemental oxygen. Above 14,000 feet, oxygen has to be used by the crew, and above 15,000 feet it must be provided for everyone aboard.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2010

"Sometimes, all I need is the air that I breathe and to love you," sang The Hollies in 1972. Nice sentiments, but wrong. You need air - not sometimes, all of the time. Many pilots scuba dive, always descending with a carefully checked tank, but many ascend without oxygen. Federal Aviation Regulation 91.211 states that a pilot of an unpressurized aircraft shall not operate from 12,500 to 14,000 feet for longer than 30 minutes without supplemental oxygen. Above 14,000 feet, oxygen has to be used by the crew, and above 15,000 feet it must be provided for everyone aboard.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2010

"Sometimes, all I need is the air that I breathe and to love you," sang The Hollies in 1972. Nice sentiments, but wrong. You need air - not sometimes, all of the time. Many pilots scuba dive, always descending with a carefully checked tank, but many ascend without oxygen. Federal Aviation Regulation 91.211 states that a pilot of an unpressurized aircraft shall not operate from 12,500 to 14,000 feet for longer than 30 minutes without supplemental oxygen. Above 14,000 feet, oxygen has to be used by the crew, and above 15,000 feet it must be provided for everyone aboard.

Let's Go Flying!

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2010

Spending a quarter of a century in love with one person is something to be celebrated, preferably in an exciting and memorable way. And for their twenty-fifth wedding anniversary, Dave and Sue Passmore of Great Falls, Virginia, did just that by earning their instrument ratings on October 4, 2009, about a week after the big day.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2010

“The heart is the only broken instrument that works,” said T.E. Kalem, former writer for Time magazine, and on Valentine’s Day, surrounded by images of love, we tend to focus on the emotional side of our biological fuel pump.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2010

Overweight or obese—common words. For the sake of completeness, let’s clarify a few facts.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2009

You are one in a million. Well, figuratively speaking, anyway.

Hangar Talk

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2009

Cessna’s Caravan has been on the market for 24 years, but it’s one of the few general aviation airplanes that Editor at Large Tom Horne hadn’t flown—until January 2009, when a trip to Wichita rectified the problem. “What a truck!” Horne says of the beast’s roll forces (see “Sky Truck”).

AOPA Action

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2009

New initiatives for a new president Boyer passes flight bag to Craig L. Fuller A new Internet-based flight planner, a campaign to boost the pilot population, and a new foundation were some of the key tools AOPA President Phil Boyer passed to incoming President Craig L.

Turbine Pilot: Pressure Pointers

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2008

Turbine aircraft engines are happiest flying high where fuel flows diminish and true airspeeds increase, but altitude is less friendly to humans. Oxygen that our lungs can extract from the atmosphere decreases with altitude.

The Ideal Airport

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2005

Several years ago, during a visit to my grandmother's farm in Gloucester, Virginia, my father and I made a trip to the old Gloucester airport. The airport had been on the Washington, D.C., sectional as a closed airport for quite some time, and we wanted to go see what had become of the field.

CJ Step-Up

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2000

As popular as they were, Cessna has decided to discontinue CitationJet production. The baby Citation that took over the step-up end of the twinjet market from its debut in 1993 has now morphed into a higher-tech iteration.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2000

Manufacturer announces new name, new plane Under its new company name, The Lancair Company has officially announced the development of its next airplane, the Columbia 400. The new plane will be powered by a twin-turbocharged, twin-intercooled Continental TSIO-550 engine and will retain the same fixed-gear configuration as the certified Columbia 300.

What Fate Meigs?

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2000

Remember Meigs Field? The City of Chicago's lakefront airport reopened on February 10, 1997, for at least five years under the terms of an agreement between Chicago and the State of Illinois. Chicago Mayor Richard M.