Fly Well

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Fly Well

Article | Dec 01, 2010

In 1949 Jerry Lewis, Tony Curtis, and Janet Leigh made a short movie titled How to Smuggle a Hernia Across the Border. Why? I have no idea.

Fly Well

Article | Nov 01, 2010

In 1949 Jerry Lewis, Tony Curtis, and Janet Leigh made a short movie titled How to Smuggle a Hernia Across the Border. Why? I have no idea.

Fly Well

Article | Oct 01, 2010

October. Falling leaves, crackling fires, perfect flying weather, and healthy lung month.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2010

Today's article is just for the boys! Prostate cancer, the most common male malignancy and second leading cause of death, merits our attention, gentlemen. Prostate cancer develops when cells divide in meaningless and uncontrolled fashion. The biggest risk factors are being male (!), aging, and family history.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2010

Today's article is just for the boys! Prostate cancer, the most common male malignancy and second leading cause of death, merits our attention, gentlemen. Prostate cancer develops when cells divide in meaningless and uncontrolled fashion. The biggest risk factors are being male (!), aging, and family history.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2010

"Sometimes, all I need is the air that I breathe and to love you," sang The Hollies in 1972. Nice sentiments, but wrong. You need air - not sometimes, all of the time. Many pilots scuba dive, always descending with a carefully checked tank, but many ascend without oxygen. Federal Aviation Regulation 91.211 states that a pilot of an unpressurized aircraft shall not operate from 12,500 to 14,000 feet for longer than 30 minutes without supplemental oxygen. Above 14,000 feet, oxygen has to be used by the crew, and above 15,000 feet it must be provided for everyone aboard.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2010

"Sometimes, all I need is the air that I breathe and to love you," sang The Hollies in 1972. Nice sentiments, but wrong. You need air - not sometimes, all of the time. Many pilots scuba dive, always descending with a carefully checked tank, but many ascend without oxygen. Federal Aviation Regulation 91.211 states that a pilot of an unpressurized aircraft shall not operate from 12,500 to 14,000 feet for longer than 30 minutes without supplemental oxygen. Above 14,000 feet, oxygen has to be used by the crew, and above 15,000 feet it must be provided for everyone aboard.

AOPA Action

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2010

FAA plan charts modernization through 2018 The FAA recently released its updated implementation plan for the transition to a modernized air transportation system. The plan outlines how the agency will act on recommendations from the industry and continue to expand satellite-based navigation and surveillance.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2010

"Sometimes, all I need is the air that I breathe and to love you," sang The Hollies in 1972. Nice sentiments, but wrong. You need air - not sometimes, all of the time. Many pilots scuba dive, always descending with a carefully checked tank, but many ascend without oxygen. Federal Aviation Regulation 91.211 states that a pilot of an unpressurized aircraft shall not operate from 12,500 to 14,000 feet for longer than 30 minutes without supplemental oxygen. Above 14,000 feet, oxygen has to be used by the crew, and above 15,000 feet it must be provided for everyone aboard.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2010

"Sometimes, all I need is the air that I breathe and to love you," sang The Hollies in 1972. Nice sentiments, but wrong. You need air - not sometimes, all of the time. Many pilots scuba dive, always descending with a carefully checked tank, but many ascend without oxygen. Federal Aviation Regulation 91.211 states that a pilot of an unpressurized aircraft shall not operate from 12,500 to 14,000 feet for longer than 30 minutes without supplemental oxygen. Above 14,000 feet, oxygen has to be used by the crew, and above 15,000 feet it must be provided for everyone aboard.