Never Again

Items per page   10 | 25 | 50 | 100
21 to 30 of 251 results

Never Again: Crossing Charlie

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2012

Never Again Listen to this month's "Never Again" story: Crossing ‘Charlie’. Download the mp3 file or download the iTunes podcast.

Never Again

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2012

Never Again Listen to this month's "Never Again" story: Cloud Attack. Download the mp3 file or download the iTunes podcast.

Never Again

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2012

For months I had been planning a dive trip at Cayman Brac, one of the Cayman Islands. My nonpilot "co-pilot" Lynn and I have gone on many dive trips in my Piper PA–32-260 Cherokee Six.

Never Again

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2012

At 10:25 on Easter morning in 2010 I held up my hand to shield the sun as I searched for the traffic at my two o'clock, 1,000 feet above. The air was smooth at 11,500 feet, above solid clouds and the rugged Washington Cascade mountains below. My family--parents, wife, kids, spouses, grandchildren--had gathered for the holiday that weekend, and now I was getting everyone home.

Never Again

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2012

It was a typical overcast winter morning at Portland International Airport in Oregon, with ceilings running around 1,400 feet agl and reported tops at about 7,000 feet msl. Ground control had just rattled off our clearance to Rogue Valley International in Medford, Oregon, clearing us to 10,000 feet.

Never Again

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2012

I was a freshly minted private pilot, and I was nearing that ego-boosting 100-hour mark. I was itching for a "real" mission--a long and exciting cross-country flight.

Never Again

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2012

In 1952, with my four-year-old Luscombe 8E that I had just purchased for $800 - a lot of money for a recent graduate of officer candidate school at Fort Benning, Georgia - I was on cloud nine before I even took off from the grass strip at King's School of Aviation in Columbus, Georgia.

Never Again

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2012

Thwack! My friend David smarted as I slapped his hand with the admonishment to never touch "my" radios. As an instrument pilot and good friend, he had assumed he was competent to help with the flight by managing some of the communications and navigation. When we landed I told him of the experience that led me to the notion that the pilot in command owns the radios, and nobody else should touch them without explicit permission.