Pilot Counsel

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Pilot Counsel: Ends of the spectrum

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2013

A recent legal interpretation by the FAA chief counsel gets into some complexity in dealing with the important regulatory difference between “private” and “commercial” operations.

Pilot Counsel: ASRS

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2013

It seems time again to remind pilots about the FAA’s Aviation Safety Reporting Program (ASRP), administered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS).

Pilot Counsel: Safety pilot

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2013

It is FAR 91.109(c) that specifically imposes the requirement that a safety pilot be on board an aircraft being operated in simulated instrument flight. This regulation is really a supplement to the see-and-avoid responsibility imposed by FAR 91.113(b). “When weather conditions permit, regardless of whether an operation is conducted under instrument flight rules or visual flight rules, vigilance shall be maintained by each person operating the aircraft so as to see and avoid other aircraft.”

Pilot Counsel: VFR weather minimums, Part II

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2013

Last month we reviewed what I call the "standard" VFR weather minimums. This month we get to the more complicated but happily lower, less stringent, minimums that are available in some airspace for some particular operations.

Pilot Counsel: VFR weather minimums: Part I

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2013

Federal Aviation Regulations 91.155 and 91.157 tell us the minimum weather conditions required for a flight under visual flight rules (VFR). These rules are fundamental to the primary way pilots avoid collisions--the see-and-avoid concept--using that indispensable piece of equipment, the eyeball.

Pilot Counsel: No defects?

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2013

A pilot, while taxiing a Cessna 210D on an established taxiway at the Opa-Locka Executive Airport in Florida, struck a parked Cessna 560 XL jet that had its tail cone approximately four feet into the taxiway. The pilot inspected the damage to the 210 and said that he found only a paint scratch on its wing-tip fuel tank.