Pilots

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Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2006

My grandfather's story started in a Velie-powered Monocoupe on a grass field in Butler, Pennsylvania, in August 1936. A private pilot license followed five months later.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2006

It was two hours until the airshow would begin. Spectators were pouring into little Sussex Airport in the lush green hills of northwestern New Jersey, creating a festive atmosphere and a growing air of anticipation.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2006

At airshows up and down the East Coast, folks walk past Charlie Kulp unaware that he is a well-known, almost legendary airshow performer. There's nothing about him or his 1946 Piper J-3 Cub that screams for attention or notice.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2005

The hangar that now houses Signature Flight Support at San Francisco International Airport used to belong to Butler Aviation. Before it housed Butler, the hangar stood on the grounds of the old airport (Mills Field Muncipal, renamed San Francisco Municipal in 1931).

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2005

Freeway Airport is arguably the national capital area's most visible general aviation field: Thousands of commuters race by daily on U.S. Route 50 near Bowie, Maryland, making their way to Washington, D.C.

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Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2005

Kate Board never really wanted to be a blimp pilot — at least not at first. "I didn't even know what a blimp was," she admits.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2005

BY PHIL SCOTT --> What should you do in an emergency? A pilot who has made 50 successful emergency landings and handled dozens of in-flight emergencies has some advice. "Watch your hands," says Skip Holm, five-time Reno Air Races Unlimited winner, Stealth F-117A test pilot, and much-decorated U.S.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2005

In Skip Stewart's world there are three steps in a pilot's education: takeoffs, landings, aerobatics. "Why everybody doesn't do that baffles me," he says.

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Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2005

Eli "Babe" Krinock has more than 15,000 hours instructing and has taught more than 1,000 students to fly. After serving in the Marines, graduating from then-Embry-Riddle Flight School in Opa Locka, Florida, and a short stint with Eastern Airlines (he was furloughed), he took a flight instructor's job in 1948 at Latrobe Airport in Latrobe, Pennsylvania (now Arnold Palmer Regional Airport).

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2005

J. Lloyd Huck had owned eight airplanes in his lifetime, but he thought the Piper Super Cub seemed to fill all his needs, although it was not popular with his wife, Dorothy.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2005

Iris Critchell began a 65-year-long exciting and successful career in aviation in 1939. She was one of the few women, nationwide, accepted into the Civilian Pilot Training Program (CPTP) at the University of Southern California.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2005

Every pilot knows the difficulty of capturing the beauty of flight on film — yet pilot-photographer Adriel Heisey takes your breath away time and again with amazing aerial images. Heisey began professional pilot training in Pennsylvania.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2005

Alexander Jefferson was a graduate of Clark University in Atlanta when World War II came. Drafted black men served in the quartermasters' corps — a dirty, filthy buck-private job paying $21 a month.

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Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2005

Someone had to fly down to Antarctica, in the winter down there, and rescue an American member of the research team based at Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station — as far south as you can possibly go. Chief pilot Sean Loutitt, copilot Brian Crocker, and flight engineer Kevin Riehl of Kenn Borek Air Ltd., of Calgary, British Columbia, fueled and loaded the company's de Havilland Twin Otter and took off heading south.

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Pilots

Article | Jan 01, 2005

It is nice to put a face to a name. After writing checks bearing his last name every month for more years than I care to remember, it was especially nice to meet John Nils Nordstrom, whose flying career was late in blooming.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2004

The whole thing started out looking like that scene from the movie Apocalypse Now. Except Wagner's Ride of the Valkyries wasn't blasting from loudspeakers.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2004

Jim Hagedorn grew up as one of six kids. Although his father was a prosperous entrepreneur — Horace Hagedorn launched Miracle-Gro fertilizer with a partner in the early 1950s — the senior Hagedorn wanted to instill in his children the same work ethic that led him to success.

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Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2004

Don't tell John Ball he's unstable. He's heard it all before.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2004

Things just aren't the same around Danbury Municipal Airport in Danbury, Connecticut. When you speak to the locals they eventually get around to it: It's Ray.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2004

Joe F. Edwards' former business card bore one word after his name, Astronaut.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2004

When the Boeing B-17G Yankee Lady leaves its home at the Yankee Air Museum in Ypsilanti, Michigan, to tour the East Coast each summer, it is one of "six or seven B-17s still flying," according to Gen. Richard Bodycombe, a pilot lucky enough to sit at the controls.

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Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2004

Joseph Ceo knows that a properly tuned oboe resonates its middle A at precisely 440 Hz. He also knows that his particular 1966 Cessna P206A cruises happily at 135 knots.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2004

Pilots from six states have trained with Arthur A.C. (Tony) Markl in Marydel, Maryland.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2004

For most pilots, flying FA2 Harriers for Britain's Royal Air Force would be adventure enough for one lifetime. And Tim Ellison, who amassed 2,500 hours of military jet time and served as a weapons instructor during 11 years in the RAF, concurs that the Harrier is "the ultimate pilot's machine: tons of power, seven different ways to take off, and 14 different ways to land." But an engine failure in May 1992 while hovering at 120 feet agl — too low for Ellison to eject — left him paraplegic, and at the cusp of a new challenge.

Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2004

Keith Darrow walks out of a cavernous hangar on the edge of the Patuxent River and makes a beeline for what most of us know as a Beechcraft King Air. But unlike most King Air pilots, Darrow and his only passenger wear the dark green Nomex flight suits of military aviators.