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Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2011

From his first ride in a Piper Cub at 10 years old to his airshow act in a Taylorcraft at 75 years young, Frank Donnelly has been there, done that, and is about to do the next challenging thing in aviation. Donnelly, a retired psychology professor—called “Dr.


Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2011

Even if you didn’t recognize the voice that should be familiar to anyone with a TV set in the New York City area, you’d still instantly know that Chuck Scarborough is a consummate newsman—simultaneously sonorous, serious, patient, comforting, and factual, the kind of guy you’d need to tell you things such as a president has resigned and another has been shot, or hijacked airliners have crashed into two of the tallest buildings downtown, or NATO has turned Muammar al-Qaddafi’s Libya into a no-fly zone. From 1974 to today, Scarborough, a 31-time Emmy winner, has been a part of that scene.

Short work

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2011

Can the annual collegiate flying championships answer two nagging questions about short-field landings: Do you really need short-field landing skills as a professional pilot? And is it imperative that your aircraft have a maximum 40 degrees of flap deflection to really nail a short-field landing? I attended the 2010 competition and talked to participants from last year and this to find out. There’s no secret to making good short-field landings, said Steve Halcomb, a Boeing 737 captain for AirTran Airways and chief judge of the National Intercollegiate Flying Association’s (NIFA) 2011 national Safety and Flight Evaluation Conference (Safecon), hosted by Ohio State University in Columbus May 16 through 21.


Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2011

After Joe Hopkins delivered two missionaries to their Brazilian villages, he took off for home base. But the highway he had planned to follow was obscured by low scud.


Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2011

Lee Wolford is an old, bold pilot—the kind that aviation maxims (and laws of averages) say shouldn’t exist. The retired U.S.


Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2011

Mike Mangold could be forgiven for hanging it all up and retiring now. As a skydiver, former fighter pilot, member of the U.S.


Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2011

Six teams from the National Disaster Search Dog Foundation (NDSDF) traveled to the northeast coast of Japan in March to help find survivors buried in the ruins created by the devastating earthquake and resulting tsunami that struck March 11. The teams of six dogs and their firefighter handlers are a part of the only organization in the United States dedicated to partnering rescued dogs with firefighters to train them to find live victims, conscious or unconscious, in disaster areas.


Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2011

You may not know the company Just Born, but you probably know the brands: Peeps. Mike and Ike.

Topics Pilots


Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2011

Girls who play the piano are supposed to be calm and demure, right? Aerobatic pilots are supposed to be tough and macho, right? Anyone who jumps out of a perfectly good airplane isn’t sane, right? Cast all of your antiquated notions aside and meet Joanna Pearce Martin, the principal keyboardist for the Los Angeles Philharmonic, skydiver, aerobatic pilot, BASE jumper, and owner of an FFA AS/202 Bravo. This is not your average piano player.

Topics Pilots


Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2011

Most Hollywood celebrities become actors before becoming pilots. Treat Williams was a pilot first and an actor second.


Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2011

Ralph Campbell’s students laud a man whom they know as aviator, teacher, and friend. He is described as exacting, even demanding; effortless and precise on the controls—and usually sitting next to them with his arms loosely crossed, relaxed but observant.

Topics Pilots


Article | Dec 01, 2010

Imagine it is 1942. Four radial engines growl as your giant Pan American Boeing 314 flying boat makes its way from San Francisco to Hawaii.

Topics Pilots


Article | Nov 01, 2010

The seeds for Doris Alexander’s yearning to fly were planted when she was a teenager gazing skyward at aircraft darting across the sky. But these were no ordinary aircraft.


Article | Oct 01, 2010

Airlinerwise, you can fly direct from New York to Chicago (720 miles, two hours and 30 minutes) or from Atlanta to Miami (660 miles, two hours), but try to get from Melbourne, Florida, to Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. It’s approximately 500 crow-flying miles, but back in 2006 it took one guy, Chris Brink, nearly 14 hours to fly it (with his wheelchair and crutches) commercially on the Department of Defense’s dime.

Pilots: Pat Schroeder

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2010

In the days before flying buses could haul a person from Washington, D.C., to Denver in three hours, Pat Schroeder’s father flew his light airplane everywhere: business, vacation, you name it. In succession he owned a Bonanza, Apache, and a twin Cessna.

Topics Pilots, Women

Pilots: Brian Binnie

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2010

At Rotary Rocket’s offices in Mojave, California, test pilot Brian Binnie stood before a group of about 20, lecturing on the Roton. Designed to blast off like a rocket and descend like a helicopter, it was Rotary Rocket’s entry for the $10 million Ansari X Prize competition to fly a civilian craft through the edge of space twice in two weeks.

Topics Pilots

Pilots: Lowell Wiley

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2010

“I feel lucky, blessed, and grateful,” says Lowell Wiley, a private pilot since February 10, 1959, who has logged 20,000 flight hours. His first flight, at age 13, was with his father in a four-place Bellanca in 1949.

Pilots: Mayte Greco

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2010

We were cruising in Mayte Greco’s Cessna 340 twin just above the Gulf of Mexico, flying the same search pattern she used to spot Cuban refugees trying to get to Florida. Flying a straight line, you look out the left window two wingspans away at the ocean, scan across the windscreen, and end up at the right window.

Pilots: Chuck Doyle Jr.

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2010

It’s a beautiful morning at Sky Harbor Residential Airpark in rural Minnesota. Crickets are chirping, the air is crisp and still—and Chuck Doyle is missing.

Topics Pilots

Pilots: Robyn Astaire

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2010

Robyn Astaire was the world’s first successful woman jockey and was honored on the cover of Sports Illustrated (July 31, 1972). But she was not satisfied being the best female jockey; she wanted to be the best jockey, period.

Pilots: Ruedi Hafen

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2010

This isn’t the story about Ruedi Hafen’s first helicopter rescue, although we’ll get to that part. Hafen is president of Niagara Helicopters, which gives aerial tours of Niagara Falls.

Pilots: Francesco 'Paco' Chierici

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2010

“I used to be a total military airplane snob,” says Francesco “Paco” Chierici, a former U.S. Navy fighter pilot and producer of Speed and Angels, a documentary film that follows two pilots through military flight training.

Pilots: Joe Manchin III

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2010

West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin III has been a pilot, aircraft owner, and AOPA member for more than 40 years.

Pilots: Dan Sorkin

Article | Dec 08, 2009

CFII Dan Sorkin has a leg up on most pilots—a plastic prosthetic leg with a San Francisco Sectional laminated into it. “If I ever get lost,” jokes Sorkin, “I’ll just take my leg off and read it.” Sorkin’s flying career began with two legs and an unreasonable fear of heights.

Pilots: Bud Bricker

Article | Nov 02, 2009

It was tough to stop speaking with Bud Bricker of Oklahoma City. He’s one of those men who have endless stories to tell about life during World War II—a time when honor, patriotism, and character were important—and one could listen to those stories for hours.