Safety Pilot

Items per page   10 | 25 | 50 | 100
26 to 50 of 253 results

Safety Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2012

Start an argument in any hangar merely by asking if spins should be mandatory for the private pilot certificate.

Safety Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2012

Aging Gracefully, Flying Safely is the name of the new Air Safety Institute online course that looks at how we fly as we age (www.airsafety institute.org/aging). It’s no secret that the average age of pilots has been climbing as inexorably as the national debt. While AOPA and other GA groups, such as EAA, are working to bring new and younger pilots into the fold, many of us have been flying for decades and would like to continue. But the safety statistics are not always kind.

Safety Pilot Landmark Accidents: Owatonna overshoot

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2011

Runway excursions -- something other than a planned departure from the pavement during takeoff or landing -- are now a focus of safety officials. It seems there has been an increase in the number of accidents and incidents, especially in jet aircraft. Unfortunately, in light aircraft, we’ve been departing runways inappropriately, and with great regularity, all along. While many of these accidents result in little more than damaged egos and hardware, they have the potential to be deadly. Such was the case of a Raytheon Hawker HS125-800 business jet on a Part 135 charter to Owatonna, Minnesota.

Safety Pilot:

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2011

Life always comes with an expiration date. While it's kind of a downer - confronting your own mortality - I'm buoyed by the comments of Freddy Heineken, the late beer magnate. Freddy was reputed to have said something to the effect that the universe got along just fine in the four to five billion or so years before he came along. It didn't bother him much during that rather long gestation period, so presumably it would be about the same afterward. We all have a variety of faith and psychological coping mechanisms to deal with the hereafter.

Safety Pilot:

Article | Oct 03, 2011

Excursions bring to mind a fun-filled family outing, but in the aviation world, excursions are something to avoid. By now, everyone knows or should know about the runway incursion problem, and the focus is now expanding to include runway excursions as well.

Safety Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2011

Where to draw the safety line in GA will always be debated because opinions and operations are so varied. There are pilots in our system who shouldn’t be flying and some who never should have been certificated in the first place—as in all other personal activities. How to fairly identify and remove them on a consistent basis is a vexing problem. The Air Safety Institute has more than 30 free online courses, publishes a quiz every other week, and offers about 200 free live seminars annually. What more should we do? Are you convinced that the government can make GA much safer than it already is, without a significant reduction in your freedom to fly? That’s really up to us, as pilots in command. So the next time someone tosses off the GA/airline safety stats for shock value, ask them if they equate the high banks of Daytona with the supermarket parking lot.

Safety Pilot:

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2011

One of the biggest safety advancements for light general aviation aircraft has been the availability of weather information datalinked into our cockpits via satellite.

Safety Pilot:

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2011

Do the current FAA Practical Test Standards (PTS) measure what’s needed in today’s flight environment? I have a standing wager that no one has yet taken: If all pilots merely flew to the current private pilot PTS just as they are written today, the number of accidents would plummet—no need for further “tinkering.” See if you agree.

Safety Pilot: Landmark Accidents

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2011

Some accidents aren’t really accidents, since the definition of “accident” includes the adjectives “unforeseen” or “unexpected.” Here is a rare FAA overindulgence to tolerate those who don’t measure up. The pilot’s history is punctuated by an incredible series of miscues and mishaps by one who was, shall we say, financially gifted but aeronautically challenged.

Safety Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2011

In a recent Air Safety eJournal, my mostly weekly blog, I cited a study released by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety touting the benefits of red light cameras. The Washington Post noted that traffic fatalities were down 26 percent over a five-year period in D.C., significantly more than cities that didn’t employ such enforcement.

Safety Pilot:

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2011

There’s plenty of aviation darkness to curse today. Aircraft sales and the pilot population are spiraling downward, manufacturing is migrating offshore, professional flying is not perceived as the glamour job it once was, and costs are up.

Safety Pilot: Landmark Accidents

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2011

High flight is exhilarating, but the atmosphere up there does not support life as we know it. Every year several accidents are attributed to hypoxia, or lack of oxygen.

Safety Pilot:

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2011

There is a myth among many in aviation and education that advanced math is essential to fly with any degree of safety and skill. Unfortunately, my father did not pass along his genetic gift for advanced mathematics, but that was little detriment to my becoming a pilot.

Safety Pilot:

Article | Nov 01, 2010

Just in case you slept through high-school Latin, a non sequitur is a thought that does not logically follow what has just been said. A recent law passed by Congress, House Rule 5900, mandates that the FAA require new pilots hired by the airlines to have at least 1,500 hours total flight time and an ATP certificate.

Safety Pilot:

Article | Oct 01, 2010

Some fairly experienced fliers have forgotten that high-powered engines driving propellers can cause aircraft to do unhelpful things during takeoff, balked landings, and stalls. In the past five years there have been more than 100 accidents where too much power applied too quickly at too high an angle of attack with too little rudder applied too slowly resulted in a too-bad outcome.

Safety Pilot: A deadly invincibility

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2010

One of the necessarily frustrating things about NTSB reports is that they generally do a good job of telling us what happened, but the why is often left to interpretation and the imagination. This month’s “Landmark Accident” fits that description perfectly and leaves us to wonder why the pilot made the decisions he did.

Safety Pilot: Revised flight plan

Article | Aug 02, 2010

Flight planning is one of those necessarily boring things requiring process and discipline to get where we’re going, taking into account weather, terrain, airspace, and airports. The results of poor planning are often the topic of this column, but even with the best of intentions weather moves in and the headwinds are stronger than anticipated.

Safety Pilot: Flight risk evaluator

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2010

The Wrights, being among the first test pilots, understood risk better than most and were methodical in dealing with it, as they were in everything else: “In flying I have learned that carelessness and overconfidence are usually far more dangerous than deliberately accepted risks,” said Wilbur. As the hardware and systems have gotten progressively better, the problems shifted from mechanical to human.

Safety Pilot Landmark Accident: I think we’re alone now

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2010

It is often the flimsiest circumstances that bring two aircraft together. This non-fatal mishap is not the usual VFR-into-IMC, descent-below- minimums, midair collision, thunderstorm, or icing-related accident, but rather a series of relatively common events that by themselves meant little.

Safety Pilot: A personal and systemic failure

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2010

For the general aviation pilot who might be contemplating an airline career, the Colgan Air Q400 (Dash 8) accident in Buffalo in February 2009 may have some far-reaching consequences. An ATP certificate or some academic/experiential equivalent is under consideration for new hires.

Safety Pilot:

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2010

With apologies to my long-suffering blog readers, who have read much of this before, a topic that riles many pilots is the antics of others in nontowered-airport traffic patterns. There are times when patterns become saturated.

Safety Pilot Landmark Accidents: Attitude or altitude?

Article | Mar 01, 2010

Pilot attitude is, perhaps even to a greater degree than skill, an accurate predictor of an unhappy outcome. This month’s Landmark Accident is a testament to the adage that haste makes waste, and that the laws of aerodynamics apply equally to all pilots, regardless of their station in life.

Safety Pilot:

Article | Feb 01, 2010

In-flight breakups are extremely rare in all models of aircraft when they are operated inside the approved flight envelope. Outside the design limits anything can be broken and no one is surprised.

Safety Pilot:

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2010

“Don’t just do something. Sit there!” That’s what my Mom used to say when bad things were about to happen without intelligent intervention.

Safety Pilot: Landmark Accidents

Article | Dec 08, 2009

Never forget that as comfortable as our glass cockpits are and as experienced as we might be, any chair that moves faster than 15 knots should be treated with great respect. The accident in this story is ironic in that it occurred to a pair of highly experienced Civil Air Patrol (CAP) pilots with more than 50,000 hours of flight experience between them.