Technique

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Technique: Sit back and relax, it’s going to be a nice flight

Article | Nov 01, 2010

The red light comes on. “Uh, oh, why is that on?” I ask no one in particular.

Technique: Tackling the tower

Article | Oct 01, 2010

A Cessna 172 pilot, disoriented at an unfamiliar airport at night, receives a taxi clearance he didn’t anticipate and winds up on an active runway. The pilot of an airliner lands at a complicated airport with multiple runways.

Top of the world

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2010

Flying the Rockies, the top of the world, can be one of the most sublime experiences in general aviation…when it is done correctly. Done incorrectly, it can be deadly.

Technique: Advice that sticks

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2010

What’s the best advice you ever heard—advice that you use on every flight? For me, it’s two tips I read years ago, and both are about making better landings. They are both from author Ron Fowler in his book, Making Perfect Landings.

Test Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2010

General 1. The classic de Havilland DHC–2 Beaver is a large, single-engine, high-wing bush plane made in Canada.

Technique: When Abnormal turns ugly

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2010

It’s ironic that when practicing emergency procedures we can sometimes set ourselves up to create the very problems we’re trying to avoid. “Don’t let a simulated emergency turn into the real thing,” flight instructors are told, and that’s great advice.

Test Pilot

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2010

General: 1. What is the Cessna 305? 2.

Technique: Helping other pilots

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2010

We’ve all been there. The sun is still well below the horizon, you are planning to take off around dawn, and you’re digesting the weather briefing you just received.

Technique: Running on empty

Article | Mar 01, 2010

We’ve all heard the maxim—“The only time there’s too much fuel in an airplane is when it’s on fire.” That’s not entirely true, of course, but carrying an insufficient amount of fuel, or not being able to get it to the engine(s), has been a frustratingly persistent cause of aircraft accidents for generations. About 200 GA accidents in the past five years were attributed to pilots running out of fuel, according to the AOPA Air Safety Foundation.