Technique

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Unusual attitude training

Pilot Magazine | Jun 05, 2014

You’re going to learn two things in this article, and both are upsetting.

P&E Technique: Tipping point

Pilot Magazine | May 14, 2014

I bear on my forearman enduring reminder of the fallibilities of three-wheel vehicles.

Technique: Rust off

Pilot Magazine | Feb 18, 2014

What do you get when you combine a low-time pilot who can’t afford to fly all that often with complicated airspace that is new to him?

Technique: What to do if you’re upside down

Pilot Magazine | Dec 23, 2013

Airshow star and aerobatic instructor Greg Koontz will gladly give you his one-flight upset training course if you insist, but he knows you probably won’t remember it a year later.

Technique: Engine-out landings at night

Pilot Magazine | Nov 20, 2013

Legal and possibly insurance issues remain from the following two incidents, so the pilots were asked to avoid those and just share lessons learned.

Technique: Autobrain

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2013

The manual for Garmin’s GFC 700 autopilot installed in a Cessna Nav III-equipped airplane is 35 pages.

Technique: Riding the wave

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2013

Some years back while flying over the Appalachians, I heard a pilot on the frequency commenting to air traffic control that she thought her airspeed indicator was malfunctioning since it was wandering up and down by 20 knots.

Technique: All the way to the chocks

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2013

The windsock indicated a direct and very strong crosswind as the clipped-wing J–3 Cub touched down on the runway. The pilot, Jimmy Gist, was doing a masterful job of putting the feather-light airplane down on its main wheels and tracking the centerline despite the stiff winter wind.

Technique: The third wheel

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2013

For such a tiny part of the airplane, the third wheel of a taildragger has a vicious bite if it's not treated with proper respect. "You can't get lazy in a tailwheel," instructor Ron Rapp explained early in 5G Aviation's tailwheel endorsement training program at Southern California's John Wayne Airport-Orange County.

Technique: Mischief with a purpose

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2013

One of the best tools for transforming a tentative student to a tiger is a simple roll of toilet paper.

Technique: Nose up, unload, roll!

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2013

A roll is the first aerobatic maneuver an aerobatic student learns, and it should be a confidence booster as well as a clean break from the past.

Technique: Learning to loop

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2013

At first glance, the loop looks like the simplest of all aerobatic maneuvers, but it’s really one of the more complex and involves much more than going fast and hauling back on the stick. The key to flying a loop properly is knowing where to look, and—hint!—it’s not just straight ahead.

Technique: Lunchtime currency

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2012

Something you can do in 30 minutes

Technique: My worst landing

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2012

Pilots tell stories they'd rather forget.

Technique: Keeping current

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2012

Several different ways of starting this article come to mind. For example, "The IPC—can't live with it, can't live without it." The instrument proficiency check is a flight check by an instrument instructor, much like a checkride, that either demonstrates your ability to fly on instruments, or shows your deficiencies and leads to more training.

Technique: Wind warrior

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2012

You just made the best landing of your flying life. So how come no one's applauding?

Technique: Don’t just shut up...and die

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2012

Recently, I read an article by a pilot who had to cage an engine on a twin--a very real emergency. He was IFR, in weather, and talking with a controller. He advised the controller that he'd shut down an engine and was diverting to a suitable airport. The controller asked whether he was declaring an emergency. The pilot said, "No."

Technique: Pilots are pessimists…and optimists

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2011

Early in training instructors typically - and without warning - pull the throttle back, inform students that they have "lost the engine," and ask the students what they plan to do next. After that, those who go on to obtain pilot certificates constantly have that "what if" question in mind. Pilots are always questioning and preparing for the worst.

Technique: AOA for GA

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2011

Pilots learn the proper definition—AOA is the angle between the chord line of the wing and the relative wind—and answers to questions we’re likely to find on FAA knowledge tests: An airfoil always stalls at the same critical AOA, and an airplane can stall at any airspeed and any attitude. But few light GA aircraft are equipped with instrumentation that can show AOA in real time, so the subject is relegated to academic discussions of aerodynamic theory that seem far removed from the ways we actually fly. Today, however, lightweight, digital, and relatively inexpensive AOA instruments provide pilots of some light piston aircraft the same safety benefits that previously were limited to high-end corporate jets and U.S. Navy and Marine aircraft.

Rally GA: Creating media moguls

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2011

Guy Roginson thinks you should be a media mogul. Don't drop the magazine just yet. Hear him out.

Rally GA: Giving women wings

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2011

The world’s first licensed female pilot, a French socialite named Raymonde de Laroche, declared in 1910 that flying was ideal for women because it didn’t rely on strength as much as on physical and mental coordination.

Technique: Unconventional Wisdom

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2011

Three events that pilots fear most are a midair collision, an airborne fire, and an engine failure shortly after takeoff while flying a single-engine airplane. The last of these occurs about twice a day.

Help is on the way

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2011

Landmark study reveals ways to enhance the flight trainign experience

Landing Insights: From the Trenches

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2011

According to my logbook, I've just completed my 4,600th landing. Looking back on them, only a few fall into the "difficult" column and that’s the way it should be.

Technique: Quick tips for the G1000

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2011

Garmin and King Schools officials have provided some tips to simplify the operation of the Garmin G1000 avionics suite. They are arranged here in the order that you would use them on a typical flight.

Technique: Cheap speed

Article | Dec 01, 2010

Sometimes pilots want to maximize speed and don’t care how much fuel they burn (think Reno racers). Other flights require slowing down for max range (think P–38s over the Pacific).

Technique: Sit back and relax, it’s going to be a nice flight

Article | Nov 01, 2010

The red light comes on. “Uh, oh, why is that on?” I ask no one in particular.

Technique: Tackling the tower

Article | Oct 01, 2010

A Cessna 172 pilot, disoriented at an unfamiliar airport at night, receives a taxi clearance he didn’t anticipate and winds up on an active runway. The pilot of an airliner lands at a complicated airport with multiple runways.

Top of the world

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2010

Flying the Rockies, the top of the world, can be one of the most sublime experiences in general aviation…when it is done correctly. Done incorrectly, it can be deadly.

Technique: Advice that sticks

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2010

What’s the best advice you ever heard—advice that you use on every flight? For me, it’s two tips I read years ago, and both are about making better landings. They are both from author Ron Fowler in his book, Making Perfect Landings.

Test Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2010

General 1. The classic de Havilland DHC–2 Beaver is a large, single-engine, high-wing bush plane made in Canada.

Technique: When Abnormal turns ugly

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2010

It’s ironic that when practicing emergency procedures we can sometimes set ourselves up to create the very problems we’re trying to avoid. “Don’t let a simulated emergency turn into the real thing,” flight instructors are told, and that’s great advice.

Test Pilot

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2010

General: 1. What is the Cessna 305? 2.

Technique: Helping other pilots

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2010

We’ve all been there. The sun is still well below the horizon, you are planning to take off around dawn, and you’re digesting the weather briefing you just received.

Technique: Running on empty

Article | Mar 01, 2010

We’ve all heard the maxim—“The only time there’s too much fuel in an airplane is when it’s on fire.” That’s not entirely true, of course, but carrying an insufficient amount of fuel, or not being able to get it to the engine(s), has been a frustratingly persistent cause of aircraft accidents for generations. About 200 GA accidents in the past five years were attributed to pilots running out of fuel, according to the AOPA Air Safety Foundation.

Technique: Spanning two worlds

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2010

With more general aviation pilots flying behind glass cockpits today, the need for glass-specific training has grown tremendously. In the case of instrument training, one of the questions being raised is the possibility of creating two distinct tracks that a student might follow.

Technique: Plain Language

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2010

You want a good grade from the FAA when traveling in Class C and D airspace, because the alternative is a violation reported to your local FAA Flight Standards District Office. Yet it may have been years since you had to deal with either class of airspace.

Technique: Plain Language

Article | Dec 08, 2009

You want a good grade from the FAA when traveling in Class C and D airspace, because the alternative is a violation reported to your local FAA Flight Standards District Office. Yet it may have been years since you had to deal with either class of airspace.