Technique

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AOPA Pilot - Technique

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2006

A compass, a clock, and a sectional chart "Meanwhile, Pancho Barnes was following the pilot's friend, the iron compass — railroad tracks. The pilots all agreed that they were never lost, simply momentarily disoriented." — The Powder Puff Derby of 1929 by Gene Nora Jessen Once, during my youth, I flew a 1947 Piper PA-12 Super Cruiser from Corpus Christi, Texas, to Soldotna, Alaska.

Technique

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2006

Your first move when the engine fails The message had been delivered via cell phone just a few minutes before: There's been a terrible accident; we think it was Leo; there were no survivors. The details were, of course, sketchy, but it was day visual meteorological conditions at Falcon Field in Atlanta that morning.

Technique

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2006

Yanking and banking toward trouble Quickest way to die in an airplane? Horse around at low altitude. If your pilot friends don't believe you, print out a copy of the AOPA Air Safety Foundation's 2005 Joseph T.

Proficiency

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2006

Worldwide tips on emergency landings "Surprise yourself by closing the throttle without premeditation or assessing the wind direction and strength, and break it off when you are in an ideal position because the hard part is already done."—Edward Jones, Cabair College of Air Training Actually the prop usually windmills if engine power is lost but "The prop windmills here" just didn't work as a title. In preparing this article, I heard that there are flight schools in the world where props are intentionally stopped — to be clear, at these schools the engines in single-engine airplanes are shut down during routine training.

Technique

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2006

Putting your professional side to work on every flight Bent metal, charred wreckage, and ruined lives point to the many failures in pilot decision making, but the clues to what makes a competent pilot decision maker are far from clear. Competence in aeronautical decision making is quite different from the skills that we learn in becoming pilots.

DIMS?

Article | Aug 01, 2006

I was never the kind of student who aced everything, especially anything to do with math. Ironic, given that my grandfather was a mathematician who worked for NASA at one time.

Proficiency

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2006

A man's got to know his limitations It seems there's been a lot of bad aviation karma in the news lately: a boundary fence overrun at Chicago Midway International Airport on an icy and snowy night; a wing strike during landing on a windy evening in Alaska; a crash in Greece because no one seemed to speak the same language. It didn't hit me immediately, but I eventually realized that all these accidents involved airlines, and even further, the Boeing 737, the same airplane I fly.

'Say Again?'

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2006

I recently was leaving the gate at a small Midwestern airport. Small, of course, is relative.

Proficiency

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2006

Staying sharp when time is short When we posed the question of proficiency to AOPA members, we asked what specific procedures and maneuvers they would practice to stay proficient if they only had an hour, or a single flight, in which to accomplish these tasks every month. Let's set aside the debate for a moment, which begs the question: Can a pilot stay proficient while flying one hour a month? "I don't think I can stay sharp anymore.

On the Way Down

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2006

We've all heard the rumor that a stabilized approach can lead to a good landing. Great, we can always use more good landings.