Instrument Rating

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GA Serves America: Tennessee time machine

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2011

James Dillard takes the call from a factory manager in rural Mississippi. The manager, who oversees production of parts used in household furniture, tells Dillard, “I have an entire third shift who doesn’t know if they’re working tonight.

Pilots:

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2011

Six teams from the National Disaster Search Dog Foundation (NDSDF) traveled to the northeast coast of Japan in March to help find survivors buried in the ruins created by the devastating earthquake and resulting tsunami that struck March 11. The teams of six dogs and their firefighter handlers are a part of the only organization in the United States dedicated to partnering rescued dogs with firefighters to train them to find live victims, conscious or unconscious, in disaster areas.

ABCs of Simulators

Article | May 01, 2011

SimCom’s Pilatus PC12 Level 1 flight training device provides pilots with a near-real-world view out the cockpit. Though the device doesn’t move, the psychosomatic feedback of the wrap-around visuals gives a convincing sense of movement.

High anxiety

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2011

As pilots, we often think about nervous passengers and how best to calm and reassure them before and during flight. But what happens when the pilot is the one filled with anxiety and paralyzing self-doubt? Can a once-enthusiastic general aviation pilot recover the joy of flying after his self-confidence has been lost? David Fern, 48, an electrical engineer in San Diego, California, and an instrument-rated private pilot with 20 years of flying experience, had to confront those uncomfortable questions after a debilitating series of panic attacks convinced him to ground himself nearly a decade ago.

Oh, the places you’ll go!

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2011

Bob Gannon in Palmyra, Syria It’s been a peaceful 10 years for Bob Gannon’s next-door neighbors in Las Vegas, Nevada. But when noises started coming from his place around mid-January 2011, there was no cause for alarm.

Pilots:

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2011

Most Hollywood celebrities become actors before becoming pilots. Treat Williams was a pilot first and an actor second.

License to Learn

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2011

A Polish immigrant visited his local flight surgeon to take a third class medical exam. The doctor had him stand in a specific spot, then pulled down a chart showing the letters: CVOKPTNXZYKV.

AOPA Action

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2011

NATIONAL ACTION DOT report shines spotlight on ADS-B program risks, cost AOPA agrees with concerns raised by a Department of Transportation inspector general’s report on the FAA’s planned implementation of the Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) program, which shined a needed spotlight on management risks, cost burdens, and disincentives for early participation in the program by pilots. The report makes nine recommendations to smooth the implementation and enhance contract oversight of ADS-B, which is to be a major component of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen).

Buying Sky Manor

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2011

Pilot conversations at Sky Manor Airport (N40) in Pittstown, New Jersey, one afternoon didn’t focus on fun places to fly or good airport restaurants. Instead, the topic was the future of their home field.

Letters

Article | Nov 01, 2010

It was impossible not to finish the article “Pride of WWII” written by Barry Schiff (September 2010 AOPA Pilot). This was by far the best article I have ever read in AOPA Pilot.

Pilots

Article | Nov 01, 2010

The seeds for Doris Alexander’s yearning to fly were planted when she was a teenager gazing skyward at aircraft darting across the sky. But these were no ordinary aircraft.

Never Again

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2010

I was a Peace Corps volunteer in the mid-1960s living in the Peruvian Andes, where a small group was working hard to establish a wildlife refuge for the endangered vicuña—a wild cousin of the llama and alpaca—which live in the high plains of the towering mountain chain. Poachers were taking a toll on the vicuña, and it was critical to find a remote and expansive habitat to sustain the animals, prized for their soft wool, long recognized as the world’s best.

Pilot Products: Online flight planners

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2010

When it comes to flight planning, modern technology and innovation has given us untold options. You can still plan with paper and pencil, but computer programs and websites can do it faster, and often much better.

Technique: Advice that sticks

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2010

What’s the best advice you ever heard—advice that you use on every flight? For me, it’s two tips I read years ago, and both are about making better landings. They are both from author Ron Fowler in his book, Making Perfect Landings.

Safety Pilot: A deadly invincibility

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2010

One of the necessarily frustrating things about NTSB reports is that they generally do a good job of telling us what happened, but the why is often left to interpretation and the imagination. This month’s “Landmark Accident” fits that description perfectly and leaves us to wonder why the pilot made the decisions he did.

Pilot Counsel

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2010

General aviation pilots can easily be confused about the concept of “night” as it relates to the rules requiring recent piloting experience, and as it relates to the flight rules governing VFR weather minimums. I must confess that sometimes I have been, and that I sometimes need a reminder.

10 mistakes JFK Jr. made

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2010

On July 16, 1999, John Fitzgerald Kennedy Jr. took off from Essex County Airport in Caldwell, New Jersey, at 8:39 p.m.

Letters

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2010

I have flown into Shelter Cove for more than 20 years and have never driven there (“Fun to Fly Sweepstakes: Adventure By Remos,” May 2010 AOPA Pilot). One time my wife and I landed and were greeted by two bull elks chewing their cud about one-third up the runway from the south end about five yards off the runway in the rough of the golf course.

Safety Pilot Landmark Accident: I think we’re alone now

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2010

It is often the flimsiest circumstances that bring two aircraft together. This non-fatal mishap is not the usual VFR-into-IMC, descent-below- minimums, midair collision, thunderstorm, or icing-related accident, but rather a series of relatively common events that by themselves meant little.

Pilotage:

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2010

It’s a gorgeous winter day, ideal for flying, even if the flying involves a checkride. Sweating through a checkride is what I’m supposed to be doing right now.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2010

This could have been written in the 1920s, although barnstorming then wasn’t done on a schedule. The American Barnstormers Tour continues its multiyear run with a new tour in the central United States from June to July.

Pilot Counsel:

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2010

There is a subtle but important legal distinction between logging pilot-in-command time and acting as pilot in command. We now have an interpretation by the FAA Chief Counsel that seeks to explain this distinction in a fairly typical situation in which many of us could find ourselves.

Let's Go Flying!

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2010

Spending a quarter of a century in love with one person is something to be celebrated, preferably in an exciting and memorable way. And for their twenty-fifth wedding anniversary, Dave and Sue Passmore of Great Falls, Virginia, did just that by earning their instrument ratings on October 4, 2009, about a week after the big day.

Turbine Pilot: Simulating reality

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2010

We’ve sure come a long way since Ed Link invented the first flight simulator with parts from his father’s pipe organ and piano company. Regardless of the levels of virtual reality, one thing’s for sure: Simulators save time, money, and—most important—lives.

AOPA Action

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2010

Long-term FAA bill deferred to 2010 The House and Senate have passed another three-month funding extension for the FAA, which has been operating under temporary extensions since its last long-term authorization expired in 2007. The House passed a three-year reauthorization in May 2009, but the Senate has yet to pass a long-term bill.

Letters

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2010

I read with great enjoyment your recent article (“Bound for the Bahamas,” December 2009 AOPA Pilot). I first visited the out islands of the Bahamas in the mid-1970s as a fisherman on a budget, then in the mid-1980s as a corporate yacht captain, and from 1994 to 2002 as a private pilot flying a 1978 V-tail 35 Bonanza.

Technique: Spanning two worlds

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2010

With more general aviation pilots flying behind glass cockpits today, the need for glass-specific training has grown tremendously. In the case of instrument training, one of the questions being raised is the possibility of creating two distinct tracks that a student might follow.

Waypoints:

Article | Feb 01, 2010

I have never liked the unrealistic nature of most flight training experiences. Whether training for the instrument rating more than 20 years ago in a Piper Warrior or more recently getting a jet type rating in a multi-million-dollar high-resolution Level D flight simulator, the pace of the flights never felt right or very realistic.

Never Again Online: Ashes in the airplane

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2010

The worst flight I ever made was an attempt to do a favor for a friend. My friend’s grandfather had recently passed away, and his family thought spreading his ashes over his ranch in Oklahoma would be a memorable and fitting tribute. I had been flying for almost 20 years and was honored to be able to fulfill this simple request. I turned the jar sideways and pushed the open end into the open window, hoping the slipstream would carry the ashes away. The slipstream took hold all right, but not in the way I intended...

Epilot

ePilot Newsletter | Jan 01, 2010

Volume 12, Issue 1 — january 1, 2010 In This Issue: Ground school in a war zone Hope in a hopeless time Buzzing sends pilot into quarry wall GA News | Safety & Proficiency | member benefits | Quiz Me Click here to view this week's custom content online today’s top stories ‘USA Today’ attacks GA airports … again USA Today launched another attack on federal funding for general aviation airports this week with two articles questioning funding for privately owned, public-use reliever airports. Airports designated as relievers are eligible for federal grants because they reduce congestion at commercial airports in metropolitan areas by giving GA users an alternative place to land.

AOPA seeks to expand changes to FAR Part 61

Advocacy | Dec 01, 2009

While the FAA is proposing 16 changes to FAR Part 61, AOPA is recommending additional changes that could benefit the GA community. Several of the proposals pertain to complex aircraft.

AOPA Action

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2009

AOPA to unveil 2010 sweeps airplane at Aviation Summit What will AOPA’s 2010 sweepstakes airplane be? A twin or single? A trainer or family hauler? A sleek high-performance airplane or fun light sport aircraft? Find out at AOPA Aviation Summit. Be one of the first to inspect the 2010 sweepstakes airplane up close! Of course, we’re still finishing out the current year with our 2009 Let’s Go Flying Sweepstakes Cirrus SR22, which also will be on display at Summit.

The ultimate safety net

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2009

The weather is beautiful. The frequency is popping with airplanes coming and going.

Pilots: Juan Serrano

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2009

On April Fool’s Day 1995, Juan Serrano thought his wife was playing a cruel joke. Over the phone, she told him of two letters for him in the day’s mail: a much-anticipated invitation to interview with United Airlines and an acceptance to law school.

Proficient Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2009

I apparently had passed the oral examination for my instrument rating, and it was time for the checkride. The airplane was a red Stinson Station Wagon, a comfortable old taildragger equipped with a low-frequency receiver and gauges barely sufficient for instrument flight (no gyros).

Test Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2009

GENERAL 1. From reader Dan Stroud: The Wright brothers could have made their famous powered flight on December 13, 1903.

Answers for Pilots: Logging time

Article | Oct 01, 2009

Logbooks mean many things to pilots--sentimental diaries of cherished time in the sky; reminders of people from years past who shared the cockpit with us; fond memories of aircraft we flew and destinations we enjoyed; journals of lessons learned. Logbooks, of course, have a practical use which includes keeping a record of time and training toward currency, and to be used for eligibility for additional certificates and ratings. It is important that airmen are aware of and comply with regulations related to logbook records to avoid problems, fines, or even certificate suspension.

Student pilot gets lift from AOPA Flight Path

Article | Oct 01, 2009

A photograph a colleague brought to work one day was enough to prompt Jan Johnson of Portola Valley, Calif., to pursue a lifelong dream of flying. Now, Johnson has help with her training thanks to a cash prize from the AOPA Flight Path Sweepstakes.

Hangar Talk

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2009

“Dr. David Nichols is not only an extraordinary doctor and pilot, but also a teacher and encourager,” says AOPA ePublishing Managing Editor Alyssa J.

Let's Go Flying!: Getting his wings

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2009

Quincey Carr of Hayward, California, believes some people could do better in life if they had more self-confidence. “You have to believe in yourself, love yourself, know what you want to do, and never settle,” says Carr, 25.

Letters

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2009

I thoroughly enjoyed Tom Haines’ Goodyear blimp article (“One Giant Icon,” May 2009 AOPA Pilot), which brought back the memory of my ride as a kid oh so many years ago. It was from the Goodyear base on Watson Island in Miami, I believe on the ship Mayflower.

Let's Go Flying!: Knowledge is power

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2009

While the fear of flying prevents some people from ever setting foot onto an airport or into an airplane, Julie Merrick of Camarillo, California, was motivated by her emotional obstacle. Nine years ago, when an Alaska Airlines airliner crashed off the coast of the Golden State, Merrick’s fear of flying intensified, but more than anything the accident intrigued her.

Letters

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2009

NASCAR drivers fly, too It seems that all racers and pilots enjoy the freedom of flight and speed (“NASCAR Drivers Fly, Too,” March AOPA Pilot). I think that these professional drivers can be an outstanding influence on general aviation and a great resource.

Never Again: Windsock warning

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2009

I’ve been flying more than 20 years, increasing my flying as my business has grown. I bought my first airplane, a Piper Turbo Saratoga, in 2006, got my instrument rating in it, and flew it 300 hours in one year for business and training.

Technique: Vital function

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2009

It sounds like the easiest pilot gig on the planet. Climb aboard and watch for traffic while the other pilot logs time flying under simulated instrument conditions.

Time to renew your TSA security awareness training?

Article | Apr 01, 2009

Spring is in the air, and many of us want to get back into flying or start flying. For a flight instructor, spring begins a busy flying season.

Letters

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2009

This glass is for you I just wanted to let you know how much I enjoyed both Ian J. Twombly’s article (“Get Your Glass Sweepstakes: This Glass Is for You,” January AOPA Pilot) and the video flight of the Piper Archer N208GG.

Let's Go Flying: Youth Movement

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2009

A flaming red sunset begins to take hold over the nearby Pacific Ocean as a graceful, long-winged motorglider appears over Santa Paula Airport. After several low passes and tight, precise patterns, the single-seat aircraft that resembles a baby U-2 touches down on its single main wheel and taxis to the open door of a hangar beside the single, east-west runway.