Learn to Fly

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Corporate Pilot-not your typical '9-to-5 job'

Article | Nov 19, 2013

Luz Beattie laughs when she says she worked in just about “every other industry” until she became involved in aviation. Ironically, she’s also worked in just about every facet of aviation, too. She got into aviation, almost by chance. Beattie graduated from college with a business degree and was working at a downtown Manhattan bank when she found a magazine lying about while she was eating lunch. “It talked about aviation colleges, and I read it from cover to cover,” she recalls. “I decided that I should look into it.” While she had always wanted to fly, Beattie says she never thought it could become a career. Finally convinced it was an option, she quit her job and enrolled fulltime in college, majoring in aviation management. But she didn’t start flying then. “My hope was to get into their college flight program, but I couldn’t get loans to cover everything,” she recalls. “So I decided to get the degree and learn to fly later.”

A Passion for Flight

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2013

Mark Baker’s entry into general aviation is classic, quintessential—a textbook case. As a kid he rode his bicycle to the airport and sidled up to the old guys there to hear flying stories while he freely poked around the airplanes, bumming rides when he could.

Flying Particles: Safe aircraft at a low cost

Article | Sep 27, 2013

One of the Flying Particles flying club's goal is to provide safe aircraft at the lowest reasonable cost.

Training Tip: One small step

Article | Sep 23, 2013

Remember how strange it seemed to learn that an aircraft is steered on the ground with foot pedals, and the throttle is worked by hand?

A passion for flight

Article | Aug 29, 2013

Mark Baker, set to be appointed as AOPA's fifth president and CEO Sept. 6, is committed to ensuring open access to aviation.

Born to fly like a bird

Article | Aug 08, 2013

Suspended upside down by his feet from a skysurfing wing attached to a hoist, Yves Rossy wiggled and twisted, struggling to break free from bindings without using his hands. It wasn’t a Houdini stunt, but a test of a life-saving escape move in case he lost control of the wing in the air.

License to Learn: Turbulence—yuck!

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2013

I don’t like clear air turbulence, and my passengers like it even less. It’s one of those things that saps the fun from flying, because it affects the neural nooks that are the primitive levels of our biology. It’s unlikely that you or your passengers will learn to like turbulence, but by understanding and sharing with your passengers what it can and can’t do to your mind and airplane, you can make turbulence tolerable.