Women

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'Racing Aces' win Air Race Classic

Article | Jun 25, 2012

Two Texas pilots who go by the name of the Racing Aces won the 2012 Air Race Classic. Fifty-five teams participated in the all-women's air race that has been an aviation tradition since 1929, when the event was known as the First Women's Air Derby.

Air Race Classic teams gathering in Arizona

Article | Jun 14, 2012

Teams of women pilots flying 55 aircraft are headed to Arizona to take part in the 2012 Air Race Classic June 19 to 22, continuing a tradition of women's air racing that began in 1929.

America’s only female Zeppelin pilot takes left seat

Article | Jun 12, 2012

There are only two Zeppelin NT (new technology) behemoths flying in the world, and women fly both of them. One is in Germany, while Andrea Deyling just completed six months of training in the United States.

Frederick airport 'most female-friendly'

Article | Apr 18, 2012

It's official: Frederick Municipal Airport, the home base of AOPA, is the most female-friendly airport in the United States. Local pilots flew 242 women and girls out of the airport on March 10 to secure the national title.

Member Guide

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2012

About 8 percent of men and one-half percent of women in the United States have problems with color perception. Whether caused by genetics, injury, or disease, color blindness is challenging to live with and presents special hurdles for pilots. The medical standards in FAR Part 67 specify that applicants for all classes of medical certification must have "the ability to perceive those colors necessary for the safe performance of airman duties." Every visit to an AME for renewal of an airman medical certificate involves taking a color vision test. Technically known as a pseudoisochromatic color plate test, it's the one with the pages of different-colored dots.

Pilots:

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2012

A knack for all things mechanical brought Nancy Ginesi-Hill from dreaming about flying to serving as a flight engineer for the only B–24 Liberator still flying.

Topics Pilots, Women

Proficient Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2012

Last October I announced an essay contest for young men and women between the ages of 16 and 21 ("Proficient Pilot: It's Payback Time," October 2011 AOPA Pilot).

Flying, it’s not a 'boy thing'

Article | Mar 14, 2012

With a 360-degree view of the airport environment, tower tourists could imagine directing a conga line of general aviation aircraft making 10-mile circuits at Maryland's Frederick Municipal Airport. Others took control of aircraft for the first time in that conga line on March 10 for Women of Aviation Worldwide Week's Fly it Forward Day.

Women airport supporters meet in Dallas

Advocacy | Mar 14, 2012

A first-ever meeting of women members of the AOPA Airport Support Network, participants shared their experience organizing their local airport supporters, rallying airports' neighbors to the cause, and educating their communities about the economic and local public service contributions made by airports and general aviation.

EAA works to boost female aviators

Article | Mar 12, 2012

EAA's Young Eagles program will celebrate 20 years this year, said EAA President Rod Hightower. The program has flown 1.6 million young people between the ages of 8 and 17 since its inception, and 30 percent of those have been females.

Attracting talented workforce will be aviation's challenge

Article | Mar 12, 2012

Over the next 20 years, the aviation industry will need more than 1 million pilots and aircraft technicians to fly and maintain the aircraft needed to support commercial air travel growth, a Boeing representative said March 10 at the International Women in Aviation conference in Dallas.

Flight training management program debuts at WAI

Article | Mar 12, 2012

MyFlightTrain, a flight training management package, was unveiled at the twenty-third annual Women in Aviation International conference in Dallas. Developed by Flying Software Labs, the system features paperless tracking for Part 61 and 141 schools as well as billing, scheduling, flight logs, and training logs.

Arizona student pilot receives AOPA training scholarship

Article | Mar 09, 2012

Maricopa, Ariz., student pilot Theresa Farley returned to flight training after a years-long hiatus and soloed--again--on Feb. 6, realizing all at once the thrill of what she's been working so hard to accomplish.

Member Guide

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2012

About 8 percent of men and one-half percent of women in the United States have problems with color perception. Whether caused by genetics, injury, or disease, color blindness is challenging to live with and presents special hurdles for pilots. The medical standards in FAR Part 67 specify that applicants for all classes of medical certification must have "the ability to perceive those colors necessary for the safe performance of airman duties." Every visit to an AME for renewal of an airman medical certificate involves taking a color vision test. Technically known as a pseudoisochromatic color plate test, it's the one with the pages of different-colored dots.

Sporty's releases Women in Aviation conference app

Article | Feb 15, 2012

Sporty's has released a new free app for the 2012 International Women in Aviation Conference, to be held March 8 through 10 in Dallas.

Three-generation team to compete in 2012 Air Race Classic

Article | Feb 15, 2012

When the Air Race Classic women's cross-country race launches from Lake Havasu City, Ariz., in June, one team of pilots will boast three generations, ranging in age from 72 to 16.

Member Guide

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2012

About 8 percent of men and one-half percent of women in the United States have problems with color perception. Whether caused by genetics, injury, or disease, color blindness is challenging to live with and presents special hurdles for pilots. The medical standards in FAR Part 67 specify that applicants for all classes of medical certification must have "the ability to perceive those colors necessary for the safe performance of airman duties." Every visit to an AME for renewal of an airman medical certificate involves taking a color vision test. Technically known as a pseudoisochromatic color plate test, it's the one with the pages of different-colored dots.

'Flying Wild Alaska' pilot to join Fly It Forward event

Article | Jan 18, 2012

Flying Wild Alaska's Sarah Fraher will join the festivities at the 2012 Women Fly It Forward event to be held on March 10 at Frederick Municipal Airport in Frederick, Md.

Women aviation trailblazers to be honored

Article | Jan 18, 2012

When Women in Aviation International (WAI) honors new inductees into its Pioneer Hall of Fame in Dallas this March, the group will include a historic group of air races, a member of the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPs), the first professional female aeronautical engineer, and one of the first women airplane mechanics for the Navy.

Answers for Pilots: Color vision

Article | Jan 01, 2012

About 8% percent of men and 0.5% of women in the U.S. have problems with color perception. Whether caused by inheritance, injury, or disease, color blindness is challenging to live with and presents some hurtles for pilots. The medical standards in FAR Part 67 specify that applicants for all classes of medical certification have “the ability to perceive those colors necessary for the safe performance of airman duties.” Every visit to an AME for renewal of an airman medical certificate, involves taking a color vision test. Technically known as a pseudoisochromatic color plate test, it’s the one with the pages of different colored dots. FAA made some changes to color vision testing in July 2008. If you hold a statement of demonstrated ability (SODA) or a letter of evidence that was issued before July 2008, your color vision waiver is grandfathered, and you will not be required to test according to the new procedures described in this article.

Member Guide

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2012

About 8 percent of men and one-half percent of women in the United States have problems with color perception. Whether caused by genetics, injury, or disease, color blindness is challenging to live with and presents special hurdles for pilots. The medical standards in FAR Part 67 specify that applicants for all classes of medical certification must have "the ability to perceive those colors necessary for the safe performance of airman duties." Every visit to an AME for renewal of an airman medical certificate involves taking a color vision test. Technically known as a pseudoisochromatic color plate test, it's the one with the pages of different-colored dots.

Walking back on

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2011

Jane Wicker was seated on the floor of the living room in her Northern Virginia townhome a few years ago, sorting through a pile of videocassettes. She had a batch of memories she wanted to transfer to DVDs—memories of her former life as a wing walker. She put a videocassette into the player and watched her younger self standing on top of a 1943 Stearman, waving to the crowd as her then-husband, Kirk Wicker, put the airplane through its paces.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2011

‘Gucci Girls’ fly Air Force tanker It took lots of arranging, since there is only one female Boeing KC–10 flight engineer in the U.S. Air Force, but for one mission an all-female crew operated an aerial refueling tanker above the Middle East.

Fly-Outs: Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2011

Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome in New York's Hudson River Valley redefines the word "old." Or should we say "really old"? For in 2011, a World War II vintage aircraft, at more than 60 years old, is old, but a World War I aircraft? That's really old. And not only are these aircraft really old, but they are performing, active flying machines from a time when aviation was in its infancy.

Musician’s flying anthem soars

Article | Sep 01, 2011

Singer-songwriter Ansel Brown couldn't help but put his feelings into music about the family of aviators he acquired when he married Lisa Wixom Brown.